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Vodafone
Vodafone
Vodafone
Group plc /ˈvoʊdəfoʊn/ is a British multinational telecommunications company, with headquarters in London.[2] It predominantly operates services in the regions of Asia, Africa, Europe, and Oceania. Among mobile operator groups globally, Vodafone ranked fifth by revenue and second (behind China Mobile) in the number of connections (469.7 million) as of 2016[update].[3] Vodafone
Vodafone
owns and operates networks in 26 countries and has partner networks in over 50 additional countries.[4] Its Vodafone
Vodafone
Global Enterprise division provides telecommunications and IT services to corporate clients in 150 countries.[5] Vodafone
Vodafone
has a primary listing on the London Stock Exchange
London Stock Exchange
and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Landline
A landline telephone (also known as land line, land-line, main line, home phone, landline, fixed-line, and wireline) is a phone that uses a metal wire or optical fiber telephone line for transmission as distinguished from a mobile cellular line, which uses radio waves for transmission. In 2003, the CIA reported approximately 1.263 billion main telephone lines worldwide. China
China
had more than any other country at 350 million and the United States
United States
was second with 268 million
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States
United States
railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Public Limited Company
A public limited company (legally abbreviated to plc) is a type of public company under the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
company law, some Commonwealth jurisdictions, and the Republic of Ireland. It is a limited liability company whose shares may be freely sold and traded to the public (although a plc may also be privately held, often by another plc), with a minimum share capital of £50,000 and usually with the letters PLC after its name.[1] Similar companies in the United States are called publicly traded companies. Public limited companies will also have a separate legal identity. A PLC can be either an unlisted or listed company on the stock exchanges. In the United Kingdom, a public limited company usually must include the words "public limited company" or the abbreviation "PLC" or "plc" at the end and as part of the legal company name
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: equity = assets value − liabilities displaystyle text equity = text assets value - text liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to a corporation's share capital (capital stock in American English)
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is any resource owned by the business. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets
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Net Income
In business and accounting, net income (also total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, bottom line, sales profit, or credit sales) is a measure of the profitability of a venture. It is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses (e.g., SG&A), depreciation & amortization, interest, and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] It is different from the gross income, which only deducts the cost of goods sold. For households and individuals, net income refers to the (gross) income minus taxes and other deductions (e.g., mandatory pension contributions). It is usually the basis to calculate how much income tax is owed
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all incomes and expenses (operating and non-operating) except interest expenses and income tax expenses.[1][2] Operating income and operating profit are sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT when a firm does not have non-operating income and non-operating expenses.[3]Contents1 Formulae 2 Overview 3 Earnings before taxes 4 See also 5 ReferencesFormulae[edit] EBIT = Net income
Net income
+
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Pound Sterling
3p, 4p, 6p,[1] 25p, £5, Sovereign (British coin), £20, £100, £500 (Silver Kilo), £1,000 (Gold Kilo)[2]DemographicsOfficial user(s) United Kingdom9 British territories British Antarctic Territory   Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
pound)   Gibraltar
Gibraltar
(alongside Gibraltar
Gibraltar
pound)   Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha
(Tristan da Cunha; alongside Saint Helena pound
Saint Helena pound
in Saint Helena
Saint Helena
and Ascension)   South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands pound)   British Indian Ocean Territory
British Indian Ocean Territory
(de jure,
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Internet Television
Internet
Internet
television (or online television) is the digital distribution of television content, such as TV shows, via the public Internet (which also carries other types of data), as opposed to dedicated terrestrial television via an over-the-air aerial system, cable television, and/or satellite television systems
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Digital Television
Digital television
Digital television
(DTV) is the transmission of television signals, including the sound channel, using digital encoding, in contrast to the earlier television technology, analog television, in which the video and audio are carried by analog signals. It is an innovative advance that represents the first significant evolution in television technology since color television in the 1950s.[1] Digital TV makes more economical use of scarce radio spectrum space; it can transmit multiple channels in the same bandwidth occupied by a single channel of analog television,[2] and provides many new features that analog television cannot. A switchover from analog to digital broadcasting began around 2006 in some countries, and many industrial countries have now completed the changeover, while other countries are in various stages of adaptation
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Broadband
In telecommunications, broadband is wide bandwidth data transmission which transports multiple signals and traffic types. The medium can be coaxial cable, optical fiber, radio or twisted pair. In the context of Internet access, broadband is used to mean any high-speed Internet access
Internet access
that is always on and faster than dial-up access over traditional analog or ISDN
ISDN
PSTN services.Contents1 Overview 2 Broadband
Broadband
technologies2.1 Telecommunications 2.2 Computer networks 2.3 TV and video 2.4 Alternative technologies3 Internet broadband3.1 Global bandwidth concentration4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Different criteria for "broad" have been applied in different contexts and at different times
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Mobile Phone
A mobile phone, cell phone, cellphone, or hand phone, sometimes shortened to simply mobile, cell or just phone, is a portable telephone that can make and receive calls over a radio frequency link while the user is moving within a telephone service area. The radio frequency link establishes a connection to the switching systems of a mobile phone operator, which provides access to the public switched telephone network (PSTN). Modern mobile telephone services use a cellular network architecture, and, therefore, mobile telephones are called cellular telephones or cell phones, in North America. In addition to telephony, 2000s-era mobile phones support a variety of other services, such as text messaging, MMS, email, Internet
Internet
access, short-range wireless communications (infrared, Bluetooth), business applications, video games, and digital photography
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Division (business)
A division of a business, sometimes called a business sector, is one of the parts into which a business, organization or company is divided.[1] The divisions are distinct parts of that business. If these divisions are all part of the same company, then that company is legally responsible for all of the obligations and debts of the divisions. However, in a large organization, various parts of the business may be run by different subsidiaries, and a business division may include one or many subsidiaries. Each subsidiary is a separate legal entity owned by the primary business or by another subsidiary in the hierarchy. Often a division operates under a separate name and is the equivalent of a corporation or limited liability company obtaining a fictitious name or "doing business as" certificate and operating a business under that fictitious name. Companies often set up business units to operate in divisions prior to the legal formation of subsidiaries. Generally, only an "entity", e.g
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Chief Executive Officer
The chief executive officer (CEO)[1] or just chief executive (CE), is the most senior corporate, executive, or administrative officer in charge of managing an organization – especially an independent legal entity such as a company or nonprofit institution. CEOs lead a range of organizations, including public and private corporations, non-profit organizations and even some government organizations (notably Crown corporations). The CEO of a corporation or company typically reports to the board of directors and is charged with maximizing the value of the entity,[1] which may include maximizing the share price, market share, revenues or another element
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