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Victrola
Eldridge R. Johnson Emile BerlinerStatus Acquired by RCA
RCA
in 1929, known today as RCA
RCA
RecordsGenre Classical, blues, jazz, country, bluegrass, folkCountry of origin United States of AmericaLocation Camden, New JerseyThe Victor Talking Machine Company
Victor Talking Machine Company
was an American record company and phonograph manufacturer headquartered in Camden, New Jersey. The company was founded by engineer Eldridge R. Johnson, who had previously made gramophones to play Emile Berliner's disc records.[1] After a series of legal wranglings between Berliner, Johnson and their former business partners, the two joined to form the Consolidated Talking Machine Co. in order to combine the patents for the record with Johnson's patents improving its fidelity. Victor Talking Machine Co
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Country Music
Country music
Country music
(/ˈkʌntri/), also known as country and western or simply country, is a genre of popular music that originated in the southern United States in the early 1920s.[1] It takes its roots from genres such as folk music (especially Appalachian folk music) and blues. Country music
Country music
often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms, folk lyric and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjos, electric and acoustic guitars, steel guitars (such as pedal steels and dobros), and fiddles as well as harmonicas.[2][3][4] Blues
Blues
modes have been used extensively throughout its recorded history.[5] According to Lindsey Starnes, the term country music gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term hillbilly music; it came to encompass Western music, which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century
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Henry Burr
Henry Burr
Henry Burr
(January 15, 1882 – April 6, 1941) was a Canadian singer, radio performer and producer.[1] He was born Harry Haley McClaskey and used Henry Burr
Henry Burr
as one of his many pseudonyms, in addition to Irving Gillette, Henry Gillette, Alfred Alexander, Robert Rice, Carl Ely, Harry Barr, Frank Knapp, Al King, and Shamus McClaskey.[2][3] He produced more than 12,000 recordings, by his own estimate, including "Just a Baby's Prayer at Twilight", "Till We Meet Again" with Albert Campbell, "The Song That Stole My Heart Away", "M-O-T-H-E-R", and "Beautiful Ohio".[4] A tenor, he performed as a soloist and in duets, trios and quartets.Contents1 Early years 2 Recording artist2.1 Collaborations3 As a businessman 4 Early radio 5 Death 6 Cultural references 7 See also 8 References 9 External links 10 AudioEarly years[edit]Burr's childhood home in St. Stephen New Brunswick.Born in the border town of St
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Arturo Toscanini
Arturo Toscanini
Toscanini
(Italian: [arˈtuːro toskaˈniːni]; March 25, 1867 – January 16, 1957) was an Italian conductor. He was one of the most acclaimed musicians of the late 19th and of the 20th century, renowned for his intensity, his perfectionism, his ear for orchestral detail and sonority, and his eidetic memory.[1] He was at various times the music director of La Scala
La Scala
in Milan, the Metropolitan Opera in New York, and the New York Philharmonic. Later in his career he was appointed the first music director of the NBC Symphony Orchestra (1937–54), and this led to his becoming a household name (especially in the United States) through his radio and television broadcasts and many recordings of the operatic and symphonic repertoire
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La Scala
La Scala
La Scala
(pronounced [la ˈskaːla]; abbreviation in Italian language for the official name Teatro alla Scala [teˈaːtro alla ˈskaːla]) is an opera house in Milan, Italy. The theatre was inaugurated on 3 August 1778 and was originally known as the Nuovo Regio Ducale Teatro alla Scala (New Royal-Ducal Theatre alla Scala). The premiere performance was Antonio Salieri's Europa riconosciuta. Most of Italy's greatest operatic artists, and many of the finest singers from around the world, have appeared at La Scala. The theatre is regarded as one of the leading opera and ballet theatres in the world and is home to the La Scala
La Scala
Theatre Chorus, La Scala
La Scala
Theatre Ballet and La Scala
La Scala
Theatre Orchestra
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Milan
Milan
Milan
(/mɪˈlæn, -ˈlɑːn/;[3] Italian: Milano [miˈlaːno] ( listen); Lombard: Milan
Milan
[miˈlãː] (Milanese variant))[4][5] is the capital of
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The Memphis Blues
"The Memphis Blues" is a song described by its composer, W. C. Handy, as a "southern rag". It was self-published by Handy in September 1912 and has been recorded by many artists over the years.Contents1 "Mr. Crump" 2 New York 3 Recordings 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 See also"Mr. Crump"[edit] Subtitled "Mr. Crump", "The Memphis Blues" is said to be based on a campaign song written by Handy for Edward Crump, a mayoral candidate in Memphis, Tennessee.[1] Handy claimed credit for writing "Mr. Crump", but Memphis musicians say it was written by Handy's clarinetist, Paul Wyer.[2] Many musicologists question how much "Mr. Crump" actually shared with "The Memphis Blues", since the words, taken from an old folk song, "Mama Don' 'low", do not match up with the melody of "The Memphis Blues".[3][4] Many think "Mr. Crump" was probably the same song as "Mr
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The Original Dixieland Jazz Band
The Original Dixieland
Dixieland
Jass Band (ODJB) was a Dixieland
Dixieland
jazz band that made the first jazz recordings in early 1917.[1] Their "Livery Stable Blues" became the first jazz record ever issued.[2][3][4][5][6][7][8] The group composed and made the first recordings of many jazz standards, the most famous being "Tiger Rag". In late 1917 the spelling of the band's name was changed to Original Dixieland
Dixieland
Jazz Band. The band consisted of five musicians who had played in the Papa Jack Laine bands, a racially integrated group of musicians who played for parades, dances, and advertising in New Orleans. ODJB billed itself as the "Creators of Jazz"
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Livery Stable Blues
"Livery Stable Blues" is a jazz composition copyrighted by Ray Lopez (né Raymond Edward Lopez; 1889–1979) and Alcide Nunez
Alcide Nunez
in 1917. It was recorded by the Original Dixieland Jass Band
Original Dixieland Jass Band
on February 26, 1917, and, with the A side "Dixieland Jass Band One-Step" or "Dixie Jass Band One-Step" (a tune later better known as "Original Dixieland One-Step"), became widely acknowledged as the first jazz recording commercially released.[3] It was recorded by the Victor Talking Machine Company in New York City at its studio at 46 West 38th Street on the 12th floor – the top floor.[4][5][6][7]Contents1 History 2 Composition 3 Personnel 4 Later recordings 5 Notes 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Original Dixieland Jass Band
Original Dixieland Jass Band
was a group of white musicians from New Orleans
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Nathaniel Shilkret
Nathaniel Shilkret
Nathaniel Shilkret
(December 25, 1889 – February 18, 1982) was an American composer, conductor, clarinetist, pianist, business executive, and music director.Contents1 Early career 2 Radio and the recording studio 3 Compositions 4 Later career 5 References 6 External linksEarly career[edit] Shilkret was born in New York City
New York City
to a musical family of Austrian immigrants.[1][2] His father played a number of instruments, and made certain that Nat and his three brothers were all accomplished musicians at an early age. Older brother Lew Shilkret was a fine pianist, but also worked in the insurance industry. Younger brother Jack Shilkret had a career that paralleled Nathaniel's career: he played clarinet and piano, recorded extensively, and conducted and played piano on the radio and in motion pictures
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Microphone
A microphone, colloquially nicknamed mic or mike (/maɪk/),[1] is a transducer that converts sound into an electrical signal. Microphones are used in many applications such as telephones, hearing aids, public address systems for concert halls and public events, motion picture production, live and recorded audio engineering, sound recording, two-way radios, megaphones, radio and television broadcasting, and in computers for recording voice, speech recognition, VoIP, and for non-acoustic purposes such as ultrasonic sensors or knock sensors. Several different types of microphone are in use, which employ different methods to convert the air pressure variations of a sound wave to an electrical signal. The most common are the dynamic microphone, which uses a coil of wire suspended in a magnetic field; the condenser microphone, which uses the vibrating diaphragm as a capacitor plate, and the piezoelectric microphone, which uses a crystal of piezoelectric material
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Billy Murray (singer)
William Thomas "Billy" Murray (May 25, 1877 – August 17, 1954) was one of the most popular singers in the United States in the early 20th century.[1] While he received star billing in vaudeville, he was best known for his prolific work in the recording studio, making records for almost every record label of the era.Contents1 Life and career 2 In popular culture 3 Selected song discography 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] Billy Murray was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
to Patrick and Julia (Kelleher) Murray, immigrants from County Kerry, Ireland.[2][3] His parents moved to Denver, Colorado
Denver, Colorado
in 1882, where he grew up. He became fascinated with the theater and joined a traveling vaudeville troupe in 1893. He also performed in minstrel shows early in his career. In 1897 Murray made his first recordings for Peter Bacigalupi, the owner of a phonograph company in San Francisco
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Monroe Silver
Monroe Silver (December 21, 1875 – May 3, 1947) was an American actor and singer who was also a comedian and monologist using a Jewish dialect-accent in his performances.Contents1 Career 2 See also 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksCareer[edit] For various record labels, he recorded 78rpm
78rpm
discs of parodies like "Cohen on the Telephone" and "Cohen Phones to His Friend Levy". Joe Hayman first recorded the monologue "Cohen on the Telephone" in London in July 1913 for Regal Records and released in the U.S. by Columbia Records.[1] Lee De Forest
Lee De Forest
recorded Silver doing "Cohen on the Telephone" for the DeForest Phonofilm
Phonofilm
sound-on-film process. The film premiered as Monroe Silver, Famed Monologist with 17 other Phonofilm
Phonofilm
short films at the Rivoli Theater in New York City
New York City
on 15 April 1923
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His Master's Voice
His Master's Voice
His Master's Voice
(HMV) is a famous trademark in the recording industry and was the unofficial name of a major British record label. The phrase was coined in the 1890s as the title of a painting of a terrier mix dog named Nipper, listening to a wind-up disc gramophone. In the original painting, the dog was listening to a cylinder phonograph. In the 1970s, the statue of the dog and gramophone, His Master's Voice, were cloaked in bronze and was awarded by the record company (EMI) to artists or music producers or composers as a music award and often only after selling more than 100,000 recordings.Contents1 The painting 2 The logo 3 Nipper
Nipper
worldwide 4 HMV 5 Further reading 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksThe painting[edit] The trademark image comes from a painting by English artist Francis Barraud and titled His Master's Voice
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Rudy Wiedoeft
Rudolph Cornelius Wiedoeft (January 3, 1893 - February 18, 1940) was a U.S. saxophonist. Biography[edit] Born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of German immigrants, at a young age Wiedoeft started playing with his family orchestra, first using a violin, then a clarinet. He relocated to New York City
New York City
and switched to saxophone, then still an unusual instrument. He became known as a virtuoso saxophonist during the 1910s, made more than 300 recordings for many different record companies, and did much to popularize the saxophone as an instrument in both the U.S. and overseas. His main instrument was the C melody saxophone, a variety which was immensely popular from the 1910s until about 1930. He also played and recorded sometimes using E-flat alto and B-flat soprano saxophones as well. His style was noted for very rapid runs of well-articulated notes in between long legato phrases in a ragtime influenced style
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Camille Saint-Saëns
Charles- Camille Saint-Saëns
Camille Saint-Saëns
(French: [ʃaʁl kamij sɛ̃sɑ̃s];[n 1] 9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor and pianist of the Romantic era. His best-known works include Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso (1863), the Second Piano Concerto (1868), the First Cello Concerto (1872), Danse macabre (1874), the opera Samson and Delilah (1877), the Third Violin Concerto (1880), the Third ("Organ") Symphony (1886) and The Carnival of the Animals
The Carnival of the Animals
(1886). Saint-Saëns was a musical prodigy, making his concert debut at the age of ten. After studying at the Paris Conservatoire
Paris Conservatoire
he followed a conventional career as a church organist, first at Saint-Merri, Paris and, from 1858, La Madeleine, the official church of the French Empire
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