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Vesuvius
25,000 years before present to 1944 age of volcano = c. 17,000 years to presentMountain type Somma-stratovolcanoVolcanic arc/belt Campanian volcanic arcLast eruption March 17–23, 1944ClimbingEasiest route Walk Mount Vesuvius
Mount Vesuvius
( /vɪˈsuːviəs/; Italian: Monte Vesuvio [ˈmonte veˈzuːvjo]; Neapolitan: Vesuvio; Latin: Mons Vesuvius [mõːs wɛˈsʊwɪ.ʊs]; also Vesevus or Vesaevus in some Roman sources)[1] is a somma-stratovolcano located on the Gulf of Naples
Gulf of Naples
in Campania, Italy, about 9 km (5.6 mi) east of Naples
Naples
and a short distance from the shore. It is one of several volcanoes which form the Campanian volcanic arc
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Venus (mythology)
Venus
Venus
(/ˈviːnəs/, Classical Latin: /ˈwɛnʊs/) is the Roman goddess whose functions encompassed love, beauty, desire, sex, fertility, prosperity and victory. In Roman mythology, she was the mother of the Roman people through her son, Aeneas, who survived the fall of Troy and fled to Italy. Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
claimed her as his ancestor. Venus
Venus
was central to many religious festivals, and was revered in Roman religion under numerous cult titles. The Romans adapted the myths and iconography of her Greek counterpart Aphrodite
Aphrodite
for Roman art
Roman art
and Latin literature
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Hercules
Hercules
Hercules
(/ˈhɜːrkjəliːz/) is a Roman hero and god. He was the equivalent of the Greek divine hero Heracles, who was the son of Zeus (Roman equivalent Jupiter) and the mortal Alcmene. In classical mythology, Hercules
Hercules
is famous for his strength and for his numerous far-ranging adventures. The Romans adapted the Greek hero's iconography and myths for their literature and art under the name Hercules. In later Western art
Western art
and literature and in popular culture, Hercules
Hercules
is more commonly used than Heracles
Heracles
as the name of the hero
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Atomic Bombings Of Hiroshima And Nagasaki
Hiroshima:20,000 soldiers killed 70,000–126,000 civilians killedNagasaki:39,000–80,000 killedTotal: 129,000–226,000+ killedv t ePacific WarCentral PacificHawaii Marshalls-Gilberts raids Doolittle Raid Coral Sea Midway RY Solomons Gilberts & Marshalls Marianas & Palau Volcano & Ryukyu TrukSoutheast Asia Indochina
Indochina
(1940) Indian Ocean (1940–45) Philippines 1941–42 Franco-Thai War Thailand Dutch East Indies Malaya Hong Kong Singapore
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Tacitus
Publius (or Gaius) Cornelius Tacitus
Tacitus
(/ˈtæsɪtəs/; Classical Latin: [ˈtakɪtʊs]; c. 56 – c. 120 AD) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. The surviving portions of his two major works—the Annals and the Histories—examine the reigns of the Roman emperors Tiberius, Claudius, Nero, and those who reigned in the Year of the Four Emperors
Year of the Four Emperors
(69 AD). These two works span the history of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from the death of Augustus, in 14 AD, to the years of the First Jewish–Roman War, in 70 AD
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Volcanic Ash
Volcanic ash
Volcanic ash
consists of fragments of pulverized rock, minerals and volcanic glass, created during volcanic eruptions and measuring less than 2 mm (0.079 inches) in diameter.[1] The term volcanic ash is also often loosely used to refer to all explosive eruption products (correctly referred to as tephra), including particles larger than 2mm. Volcanic ash
Volcanic ash
is formed during explosive volcanic eruptions when dissolved gases in magma expand and escape violently into the atmosphere. The force of the escaping gas shatters the magma and propels it into the atmosphere where it solidifies into fragments of volcanic rock and glass. Ash
Ash
is also produced when magma comes into contact with water during phreatomagmatic eruptions, causing the water to explosively flash to steam leading to shattering of magma
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Volcanic Rock
Volcanic
Volcanic
rock (often shortened to volcanics in scientific contexts) is a rock formed from magma erupted from a volcano. In other words, it differs from other igneous rock by being of volcanic origin. Like all rock types, the concept of volcanic rock is artificial, and in nature volcanic rocks grade into hypabyssal and metamorphic rocks and constitute an important element of some sediments and sedimentary rocks. For these reasons, in geology, volcanics and shallow hypabyssal rocks are not always treated as distinct. In the context of Precambrian
Precambrian
shield geology, the term "volcanic" is often applied to what are strictly metavolcanic rocks. Volcanic
Volcanic
rocks are among the most common rock types on Earth's surface, particularly in the oceans. On land, they are very common at plate boundaries and in flood basalt provinces
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Italian Language
Italian ( italiano (help·info) [itaˈljaːno] or lingua italiana [ˈliŋɡwa itaˈljaːna]) is a Romance language. Italian is by most measures, together with the Sardinian language, the closest tongue to vulgar Latin
Latin
of the Romance languages.[7] Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City
Vatican City
and western Istria
Istria
(in Slovenia
Slovenia
and Croatia). It used to have official status in Albania, Malta
Malta
and Monaco, where it is still widely spoken, as well as in former Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
and Italian North Africa regions where it plays a significant role in various sectors
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Fresco
Fresco
Fresco
(plural frescos or frescoes) is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid, or wet lime plaster. Water
Water
is used as the vehicle for the dry-powder pigment to merge with the plaster, and with the setting of the plaster, the painting becomes an integral part of the wall. The word fresco (Italian: affresco) is derived from the Italian adjective fresco meaning "fresh", and may thus be contrasted with fresco-secco or secco mural painting techniques, which are applied to dried plaster, to supplement painting in fresco
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Volcanic Cone
Volcanic cones are among the simplest volcanic landforms. They are built by ejecta from a volcanic vent, piling up around the vent in the shape of a cone with a central crater. Volcanic cones are of different types, depending upon the nature and size of the fragments ejected during the eruption. Types of volcanic cones include stratocones, spatter cones, tuff cones, and cinder cones.[1][2]Contents1 Stratocone 2 Spatter cone 3 Tuff
Tuff
cones (ash cones) 4 Cinder cone 5 Rootless cones 6 ReferencesStratocone[edit] Main article: StratovolcanoOsorno volcano in Chile is an example of a well-developed stratocone.Stratocones are large cone-shaped volcanoes made up of lava flows, explosively erupted pyroclastic rocks, and igneous intrusives that are typically centered around a cylindrical vent. Unlike shield volcanoes, they are characterized by a steep profile and periodic, often alternating, explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Neapolitan Language
Neapolitan (autonym: (’o n)napulitano [(o n)napuliˈtɑːnə]; Italian: napoletano) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Italo-Dalmatian group spoken across much of southern Italy, except for southern Calabria
Calabria
and Sicily.[4][5][6] It is not named specifically after the city of Naples, but rather the homonymous Kingdom that once covered most of the area, and of which the city was the capital
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Normal Route
A normal route or normal way (French: Voie Normale; German: Normalweg) is the most frequently used route for ascending and descending a mountain peak. It is usually the simplest route.[1][2] In the Alps, routes are classed in the following ways, based on their waymarking, construction and upkeep:Footpaths (Fußwege) Hiking trails (Wanderwege) Mountain trails (Bergwege) Alpine routes (Alpine Routen) Climbing
Climbing
routes (Kletterrouten) and High Alpine routes (Hochalpine Routen) in combined rock and ice terrain, (UIAA) graded by difficultySometimes the normal route is not the easiest ascent to the summit, but just the one that is most used. There may be technically easier variations. This is especially the case on the Watzmannfrau, the Hochkalter
Hochkalter
and also Mount Everest
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Thermal Energy
Thermal energy
Thermal energy
is a term sometimes used loosely as a synonym for more rigorous thermodynamic quantities such as the (entire) internal energy of a system; or for heat or sensible heat which are defined as types of transfer of energy (just as work is another type of transfer of energy), or for the characteristic energy of a degree of freedom in a thermal system k T displaystyle kT , where T displaystyle T is temperature and k displaystyle k is the Boltzmann constant
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Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
Diodorus Siculus
(/ˌdaɪəˈdɔːrəs ˈsɪkjʊləs/; Greek: Διόδωρος Σικελιώτης Diodoros Sikeliotes) (fl. 1st century BC) or Diodorus of Sicily
Sicily
was a Greek historian. He is known for writing the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica, much of which survives, between 60 and 30 BC. It is arranged in three parts. The first covers mythic history up to the destruction of Troy, arranged geographically, describing regions around the world from Egypt, India
India
and Arabia
Arabia
to Greece
Greece
and Europe. The second covers the Trojan War
Trojan War
to the death of Alexander the Great. The third covers the period to about 60 BC
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