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Vegetation
Vegetation
Vegetation
is an assemblage of plant species and the ground cover they provide.[2] It is a general term, without specific reference to particular taxa, life forms, structure, spatial extent, or any other specific botanical or geographic characteristics. It is broader than the term flora which refers to species composition. Perhaps the closest synonym is plant community, but vegetation can, and often does, refer to a wider range of spatial scales than that term does, including scales as large as the global
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Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
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Burtt Davy
Joseph Burtt Davy
Joseph Burtt Davy
(7 March 1870 Findern, Derbyshire
Derbyshire
– 20 August 1940 Birmingham) was a Quaker
Quaker
botanist and agrostologist. He was the first curator of the Forest Herbarium (FHO) at the Imperial Forestry Institute when it was founded in 1924 under the Directorship of Professor Robert Scott Troup.[1] He attended school at Ilkley
Ilkley
in West Yorkshire. In 1891, he joined Kew Gardens as a technical assistant, leaving shortly after for the United States where he enrolled in the botany department at the University of California. Here he studied agriculture from 1893–96 and took up the post of botanist at the Agricultural Experiment Station in California between 1896-1901, describing the Cyperaceae
Cyperaceae
and Gramineae
Gramineae
for A Flora of Western Middle California by Willis Linn Jepson
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Bureau Of Land Management
The Bureau of Land Management
Bureau of Land Management
(BLM) is an agency within the United States Department of the Interior that administers more than 247.3 million acres (1,001,000 km2) of public lands in the United States
United States
which constitutes one-eighth of the landmass of the country.[2] President Harry S. Truman
Harry S

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Emil Von Sydow
Sydow may refer to: Hans Sydow (author abbreviation Syd., 1879–1946), a German mycologist, son of Paul Paul Sydow (author abbreviation P. Syd., 1851–1925), a mycologist and lichenologist, father of HansSee also[edit]Von SydowThis page lists people with the surname Sydow
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Carl Friedrich Philipp Von Martius
Carl Friedrich Philipp (Karl Friedrich Philipp) von Martius (April 17th, 1794 – December 13th, 1868) was a German botanist and explorer.Contents1 Life 2 Herbarium
Herbarium
Martii 3 Route followed in Brazil
Brazil
during 1817-1820 expedition 4 Selected publications 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksLife[edit] Martius was born at Erlangen, the son of Prof Ernst Wilhelm Martius, court apothecary.[2] He graduated Ph.D. from Erlangen
Erlangen
University in 1814, publishing as his thesis a critical catalogue of plants in the university's botanical garden. After that he continued to devote himself to botanical study, and in 1817 he and Johann Baptist von Spix
Johann Baptist von Spix
were sent to Brazil
Brazil
by Maximilian I Joseph, the king of Bavaria
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Garden
A garden is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside for the display, cultivation and enjoyment of plants and other forms of nature. The garden can incorporate both natural and man-made materials. The most common form today is known as a residential garden, but the term garden has traditionally been a more general one. Zoos, which display wild animals in simulated natural habitats, were formerly called zoological gardens.[1][2] Western gardens are almost universally based on plants, with garden often signifying a shortened form of botanical garden. Some traditional types of eastern gardens, such as Zen gardens, use plants sparsely or not at all
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Road Verge
A road verge is a strip of grass or plants, and sometimes also trees, located between a roadway (carriageway) and a sidewalk (pavement).[1] Verges are known by dozens of other names, often quite regional; see Terminology, below. The land is often public property, with maintenance usually being a municipal responsibility. Some municipal authorities, however, require that abutting property owners maintain their respective verge areas, as well as the adjunct footpaths or sidewalks.[2] Benefits include visual aesthetics, increased safety and comfort of sidewalk users, protection from spray from passing vehicles, and a space for benches, bus shelters, street lights, and other public amenities. Verges are also often part of sustainability for water conservation or the management of urban runoff and water pollution[3][4][5] and can provide useful wildlife habitat
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Augustin De Candolle
Augustin Pyramus de Candolle also spelled Augustin Pyrame de Candolle (4 February 1778 – 9 September 1841) was a Swiss botanist. René Louiche Desfontaines launched de Candolle's botanical career by recommending him at an herbarium. Within a couple of years de Candolle had established a new genus, and he went on to document hundreds of plant families and create a new natural plant classification system. Although de Candolle's main focus was botany, he also contributed to related fields such as phytogeography, agronomy, paleontology, medical botany, and economic botany. Candolle originated the idea of "Nature's war", which influenced Charles Darwin and the principle of natural selection.[1] de Candolle recognized that multiple species may develop similar characteristics that did not appear in a common evolutionary ancestor; this was later termed analogy
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John Stanley Beard
Stanley
Stanley
is a family name and a masculine given name. Stanley
Stanley
may also refer to:Contents1 Places1.1 Australia 1.2 Canada 1.3 Democratic Republic of Congo / Uganda 1.4 Egypt 1.5 Falkland Islands (United Kingdom) 1.6 Hong Kong 1.7 Papua New Guinea 1.8 United Kin
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Hermann Wagner (geographer)
Hermann or Herrmann may refer to:Hermann (name), list of people with this name Éditions Hermann, French publisher Hermann, Missouri, a town on the Missouri River in the United StatesHermann AVA, Missouri wine regionThe German SC1000 bomb of World War II was nicknamed the "Hermann" by the British, in reference to Hermann Göring Herrmann Hall, the former Hotel Del Monte, at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California Memorial Hermann Healthcare System, a large health system in Southeast Texas The Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI), a system to measure and describe thinking preferences in people Hermann station (other), stations of the nameSee also[edit]Herman (other)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Hermann. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Linnean Taxonomy
Linnaean taxonomy can mean either of two related concepts:the particular form of biological classification (taxonomy) set up by Carl Linnaeus, as set forth in his Systema Naturae (1735) and subsequent works. In the taxonomy of Linnaeus there are three kingdoms, divided into classes, and they, in turn, into orders, genera (singular: genus), and species (singular: species), with an additional rank lower than species. a term for rank-based classification of organisms, in general. That is, taxonomy in the traditional sense of the word: rank-based scientific classification. This term is especially used as opposed to cladistic systematics, which groups organisms into clades. It is attributed to Linnaeus, although he neither invented the concept of ranked classification (it goes back to Plato and Aristotle) nor gave it its present form
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Redwood Forest
Sequoia sempervirens /sɪˈkɔɪ.ə sɛmpərˈvaɪrənz/[2] is the sole living species of the genus Sequoia in the cypress family Cupressaceae (formerly treated in Taxodiaceae). Common names include coast redwood, coastal redwood[3] and California redwood.[4] It is an evergreen, long-lived, monoecious tree living 1,200–1,800 years or more.[5] This species includes the tallest living trees on Earth, reaching up to 379 feet (115.5 m) in height (without the roots) and up to 29.2 feet (8.9 m) in diameter at breast height (dbh). These trees are also among the oldest living things on Earth
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Heinz Ellenberg
Ellenberg may refer to:Places in GermanyEllenberg, Saxony-Anhalt, in Altmarkkreis Salzwedel district Ellenberg, Baden-Württemberg Ellenberg, Rhineland-PalatinatePeopleHeinz Ellenberg, botanist and ecologist Jordan Ellenberg, mathematicianSee also[edit]Ellenburg, New York, a townThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Ellenberg. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Spatial Ecology
Spatial ecology represents the ultimate distributional or spatial unit occupied by a species. In a particular habitat shared by several species, each of the species is usually confined to its own micro habitat or spatial niche because two species in the same general territory cannot usually occupy the same ecological niche for any significant length of time.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Concepts3.1 Scale 3.2 Spatial autocorrelation 3.3 Pattern4 Applications4.1 Research 4.2 Interdisciplinary5 Statistical tests5.1 Tests based on distance6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOverview[edit] In nature, organisms are neither distributed uniformly nor at random, forming instead some sort of spatial pattern.[1] This is due to various energy inputs, disturbances, and species interactions that result in spatially patchy structures or gradients
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Ground Cover
Groundcover
Groundcover
or ground cover is any plant that grows over an area of ground. Groundcover
Groundcover
provides protection of the topsoil from erosion and drought. In an ecosystem, the ground cover forms the layer of vegetation below the shrub layer known as the herbaceous layer. The most widespread ground covers are grasses of various types. In ecology, groundcover is a difficult subject to address because it is known by several different names and is classified several different ways. The term groundcover could also be referring to “the herbaceous layer,” “regenerative layer", “ground flora” or even "step over." In agriculture, ground cover refers to anything that lies on top of the soil and protects it from erosion and inhibits weeds. It can be anything from a low layer of grasses to a plastic material
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