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Unilever
Unilever
Unilever
(/ˈjuːnɪˌliːvər/) is a British-Dutch transnational consumer goods company co-headquartered in London, United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Rotterdam, Netherlands. Its products include food, beverages, cleaning agents and personal care products
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Spread (food)
A spread is a food that - as its name suggests - is spread, generally with a knife, onto food products such as bread and crackers. Spreads are added to food in order to enhance the flavor or texture of the food, which may be considered bland without it. Spreads should be distinguished from dips, such as salsa, which are generally not applied to spread onto food but have food dipped into them instead. Peanut butter is a typical example of spread.[1] Common spreads include dairy spreads (such as cheeses, creams, and butters—although the term butter is broadly applied to many spreads), honey, plant-derived spreads (such as jams, jellies, and hummus), yeast spreads (such as vegemite and marmite), and meat-based spreads (such as pâté).[2] See also[edit] Cheese
Cheese
spread List of spreads List of dips Lists of foods Food portalReferences[edit]^ Jon Krampner (20 November 2012). Creamy and Crunchy: An Informal History of Peanut Butter, the All-American Food
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
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Euro
The single currency[1]local namesЕвро (Bulgarian) Eυρώ (Greek) Euró (Hungarian) Eiro (Latvian) Euras (Lithuanian) Ewro (Maltese) Evro (Slovene)Banknotes €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200, €500 (until the end of 2018)Coins 1c, 2c, 5c, 10c, 20c, 50c, €1, €2DemographicsOfficial user(s) Eurozone
Eurozone
(19) Austria  Belgium  Cyprus[note 1]  Estonia  Finland  France[note 2]  Germany  Greece  Ireland  Italy[note 3]  Latvia  Lithuania  Luxembourg  Malta  Netherlands[note 4]  Portugal  Slova
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Cleaning Agent
Cleaning agents are substances (usually liquids, powders, sprays, or granules) used to remove dirt, including dust, stains, bad smells, and clutter on surfaces. Purposes of cleaning agents include health, beauty, removing offensive odor, and avoiding the spread of dirt and contaminants to oneself and others. Some cleaning agents can kill bacteria, e.g. on door handles, worktops and other metallic surfaces, and clean at the same time
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
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Public Limited Company
A public limited company (legally abbreviated to plc) is a type of public company under the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
company law, some Commonwealth jurisdictions, and the Republic of Ireland. It is a limited liability company whose shares may be freely sold and traded to the public (although a plc may also be privately held, often by another plc), with a minimum share capital of £50,000 and usually with the letters PLC after its name.[1] Similar companies in the United States are called publicly traded companies. Public limited companies will also have a separate legal identity. A PLC can be either an unlisted or listed company on the stock exchanges. In the United Kingdom, a public limited company usually must include the words "public limited company" or the abbreviation "PLC" or "plc" at the end and as part of the legal company name
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Euronext
Stéphane Boujnah[5] ( Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Managing Board) Lee Hodgkinson[6] (CEO Euronext
Euronext
London
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Naamloze Vennootschap
Naamloze vennootschap
Naamloze vennootschap
(Dutch pronunciation: [ˈnaːmloːzə ˈvɛnoːtsxɑp]; correctly abbreviated nv, however, often abbreviated N.V. or NV) is a legal structure of a company (of the sort "public company") conformable law in the Netherlands, Belgium, Indonesia, and Suriname.[1] The company is owned by shareholders, and the company's shares are not registered to certain owners, so that they may be traded on the public stock market. The phrase literally means "nameless partnership" or "anonymous venture" and comes from the fact that the partners (the shareholders) are not directly known. This is in contrast to the term for a private limited company, which is called besloten vennootschap (an "exclusive" or "closed partnership", one in which stock is not for sale on open markets). The naamloze vennootschap is a legal entity in the Netherlands, Belgium, Aruba, Curaçao, Suriname, St
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London Stock Exchange
The London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange (LSE) is a stock exchange located in the City of London, England. As of December 2014[update], the Exchange had a market capitalisation of US$6.06 trillion (short scale), making it the third-largest stock exchange in the world[2] by this measurement (the largest in Europe ahead of Euronext). The Exchange was founded in 1801 and its current premises are situated in Paternoster Square
Paternoster Square
close to St Paul's Cathedral
St Paul's Cathedral
in the City of London. The Exchange is part of the London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange Group. London
London
Stock
Stock
Exchange is one of the world’s oldest stock exchanges and can trace its history back more than 300 years
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New York Stock Exchange
nyse.comNew York Stock
Stock
ExchangeU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkNYC LandmarkFront Elevation of the New York Stock
Stock
Exchange.Show map of Lower ManhattanShow map of New YorkShow map of the USCoordinates 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Coordinates: 40°42′24.6″N 74°0′39.7″W / 40.706833°N 74.011028°W / 40.706833; -74.011028Built 1903Architect Trowbridge & Livingston; George B. PostArchitectural style Classical RevivalNRHP reference # 78001877Significant datesAdded to NRHP June 2, 1978[4]Designated NHL June 2, 1978[5]Designated NYCL July 9, 1985The New York Stock
Stock
Exchange (abbreviated as NYSE and nicknamed "The Big Board"),[6] is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York
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