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Tzedakah
Tzedakah
Tzedakah
[tsedaˈka] or Ṣ'daqah [sˤəðaːˈqaː] in Classical Hebrew (Hebrew: צדקה‎, is a Hebrew word literally meaning justice or righteousness but commonly used to signify charity - [1] though it is a different concept from the modern English understanding of "charity," which is typically understood as a spontaneous act of goodwill and a marker of generosity, where as tzedakah is an obligation. In Judaism, tzedakah refers to the religious obligation to do what is right and just, which Judaism
Judaism
emphasizes is an important part of living a spiritual life. Unlike voluntary philanthropy, tzedakah is seen as a religious obligation that must be performed regardless of financial standing, even by poor people
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Tiberias
Tiberias
Tiberias
(/taɪˈbɪəriəs/; Hebrew: טְבֶרְיָה‬, Tverya,  (audio) (help·info); Arabic: طبرية‎, Ṭabariyyah) is an Israeli city on the western shore of the Sea of Galilee. Established around 20 CE, it was named in honour of the second emperor of the Roman Empire, Tiberius.[2] In 2016 it had a population of 43,148.[1] Tiberias
Tiberias
was held in great respect in Judaism
Judaism
from the middle of the 2nd century CE[3] and since the 16th century has been considered one of Judaism's Four Holy Cities, along with Jerusalem, Hebron
Hebron
and Safed.[4] In the 2nd–10th centuries, Tiberias
Tiberias
was the largest Jewish city in the Galilee
Galilee
and the political and religious hub of the Jews
Jews
of Israel
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Messiah In Judaism
In Judaism, messiah (Hebrew: מָשִׁיחַ‎, translit. māšîaḥ; Greek: χριστός, translit. khristós, lit. 'anointed, covered in oil') is a title for a savior and liberator of the Jewish people
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Tosefta
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) ——Jerusalem Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
bar Yohai—— Leviticus —— Sifra
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Mishneh Torah
The Mishneh Torah
Torah
(Hebrew: מִשְׁנֵה תּוֹרָה‎, "Repetition of the Torah"), subtitled Sefer Yad ha-Hazaka (ספר יד החזקה " Book
Book
of the Strong Hand"), is a code of Jewish religious law (Halakha) authored by Maimonides
Maimonides
( Rabbi
Rabbi
Moshe ben Maimon, also known as RaMBaM or "Rambam"). The Mishneh Torah
Torah
was compiled between 1170 and 1180 (4930–4940), while Maimonides
Maimonides
was living in Egypt, and is regarded as Maimonides' magnum opus. Accordingly, later sources simply refer to the work as "Maimon", "Maimonides" or "RaMBaM", although Maimonides
Maimonides
composed other works. Mishneh Torah
Torah
consists of fourteen books, subdivided into sections, chapters, and paragraphs
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Outline Of Judaism
Outline may refer to: Outline (list), a document summary, in hierarchical list format Outline (software), a note-taking application Outline drawing, a sketch depicting the outer edges of a person or object, without interior details or shading Outline typeface, in typography The
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Shulchan Aruch
The Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(Hebrew: שֻׁלְחָן עָרוּך‬ [ʃulˈħan ʕaˈʁuχ], literally: "Set Table"),[1] also known by various Jewish communities but not all as "the Code of Jewish Law," is the most widely consulted of the various legal codes in Judaism
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Mishnah Berurah
The Mishnah Berurah
Mishnah Berurah
(Hebrew: משנה ברורה‎ "Clarified Teaching") is a work of halakha (Jewish law) by Rabbi
Rabbi
Yisrael Meir Kagan (Poland, 1838–1933), also colloquially known by the name of another of his books, Chofetz Chaim "Desirer of Life"
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Aruch HaShulchan
Aruch HaShulchan
Aruch HaShulchan
(Hebrew: עָרוּךְ הַשֻּׁלְחָן [or, arguably, עָרֹךְ הַשֻּׁלְחָן; see Title below]) is a chapter-to-chapter restatement of the Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(the latter being the most influential codification of halakhah in the post-Talmudic era)
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Zohar
The Zohar
Zohar
(Hebrew: זֹהַר‬, lit. "Splendor" or "Radiance") is the foundational work in the literature of Jewish mystical thought known as Kabbalah.[1] It is a group of books including commentary on the mystical aspects of the Torah
Torah
(the five books of Moses) and scriptural interpretations as well as material on mysticism, mythical cosmogony, and mystical psychology. The Zohar
Zohar
contains discussions of the nature of God, the origin and structure of the universe, the nature of souls, redemption, the relationship of Ego to Darkness and "true self" to "The Light of God", and the relationship between the "universal energy" and man
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Piyyut
A piyyut or piyut (plural piyyutim or piyutim, Hebrew: פִּיּוּטִים / פיוטים, פִּיּוּט / פיוט‬ pronounced [piˈjut, pijuˈtim]; from Greek ποιητής poiētḗs "poet") is a Jewish liturgical poem, usually designated to be sung, chanted, or recited during religious services. Piyyutim have been written since Temple times. Most piyyutim are in Hebrew or Aramaic, and most follow some poetic scheme, such as an acrostic following the order of the Hebrew alphabet
Hebrew alphabet
or spelling out the name of the author. Many piyyutim are familiar to regular attendees of synagogue services. For example, the best-known piyyut may be Adon Olam
Adon Olam
("Master of the World"), sometimes (but almost certainly wrongly) attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol
Solomon ibn Gabirol
in 11th century Spain
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Four Holy Cities
The Four Holy Cities
Four Holy Cities
(Hebrew: ארבע ערי הקודש‎, Yiddish: פיר רוס שטעט‎) is the collective term in Jewish tradition applied to the cities of Jerusalem, Hebron, Safed
Safed
and, later, Tiberias, the four main centers of Jewish life after the Ottom
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Siddur
A siddur (Hebrew: סדור‎ [siˈduʁ]; plural siddurim סדורים, [siduˈʁim]) is a Jewish prayer
Jewish prayer
book, containing a set order of daily prayers
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Safed
Safed
Safed
(Hebrew: צְפַת‬ Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas, Biblical: Ṣ'fath; Arabic: صفد‎, Ṣafad) is a city in the Northern District of Israel
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Hebron
Hebron
Hebron
(Arabic: الْخَلِيل‎  al-Khalīl; Hebrew: חֶבְרוֹן‬  Ḥevron) is a Palestinian[4][5][6][7] city located in the southern West Bank, 30 km (19 mi) south of Jerusalem. Nestled in the Judaean Mountains, it lies 930 meters (3,050 ft) above sea level
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