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Two Rivers (other)
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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River (other)
A river is a flowing body of water. River
River
may also refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Arts, entertainment, and media2.1 Films and television 2.2 Music2.2.1 Albums 2.2.2 Songs3 Sports 4 Other uses 5 See alsoPlaces[edit]River, Kent, a village and civil parish in Kent, England River, West Sussex, a hamlet in England River, Indiana, former name of San Pierre, US River
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Depression (geology)
A depression in geology is a landform sunken or depressed below the surrounding area. Depressions form by various mechanisms. Erosion-related:Blowout: a depression created by wind erosion typically in either a partially vegetated sand dune ecosystem or dry soils (such as a post-glacial loess environment).[1] Glacial valley: a depression carved by erosion by a glacier. River valley: a depression carved by fluvial erosion by a river. Area of subsidence caused by the collapse of an underlying structure such as sinkholes in karst terrain. Sink: an endorheic depression generally containing a persistent or intermittent (seasonal) lake, a salt flat (playa) or dry lake, or an ephemeral lake.Collapse-related:Sinkhole: a depression formed as a result of the collapse of rocks lying above a hollow
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Horseshoe Bend (Arizona)
Horseshoe Bend is a horseshoe-shaped incised meander of the Colorado River located near the town of Page, Arizona, in the United States.[1] Horseshoe Bend is located 5 miles (8.0 km) downstream from the Glen Canyon Dam
Glen Canyon Dam
and Lake Powell
Lake Powell
within Glen Canyon
Glen Canyon
National Recreation Area, about 4 miles (6.4 km) southwest of Page.[1][2] It is accessible via hiking a 1.5-mile (2.4 km) round trip from U.S. Route 89,[1] but an access road[citation needed] also reaches the geological structure, as it is part of a state park
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Arizona
As of 2010English 74.1% Spanish 19.5% Navajo 1.9% Other 4.5 %Demonym Arizonan[1]Capital PhoenixLargest city PhoenixLargest metro Phoenix metropolitan areaArea Ranked 6th • Total 113,990[2] sq mi (295,234 km2) • Width 310 miles (500 km) • Length 400 miles (645 km) • % water 0.35 • Latitude 31°  20′ N to 37° N • Longitude 109°  03′ W to 114°  49′ WPopulation Ranked 14th • Total 6,931,071 (2016 est.)[3] • Density 57/sq mi  (22/km2) Ranked 33rd • Median household income $52,248 [4] (33rd)Elevation • Highest point Humphreys Peak[5][6][7] 12,637 ft (3852 m) • Mean 4,100 ft  (1250 m) • Lowest point
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River Source
The source or headwaters of a river or stream is the furthest place in that river or stream from its estuary or confluence with another river, as measured along the course of the river.Contents1 Definition 2 Characteristics of sources2.1 Example3 Related usages 4 See also 5 ReferencesDefinition[edit]The marker indicating the source of the Po River, near Crissolo. "Here is born the Po"The United States Geological Survey
United States Geological Survey
(USGS) states that a river's "length may be considered to be the distance from the mouth to the most distant headwater source (irrespective of stream name), or from the mouth to the headwaters of the stream commonly known as the source stream". As an example of the second definition above, the USGS at times considers the Missouri River
River
as a tributary of the Mississippi River
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River Mouth
A river mouth is the part of a river where the river flows into another river, a lake, a reservoir, a sea, or an ocean.[citation needed]Contents1 Water motion 2 Landforms 3 Cultural influence 4 See also 5 ReferencesWater motion[edit] The water from a river can enter the receiving body in a variety of different ways.[1] The motion of the river mainly depends on the relative density of the river compared to the receiving water and any ambient motion in the receiving water, such as tides or seiches.[citation needed] If the river water is denser than the surface of the receiving water, the river water will plunge below the surface at the plunge curve
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Stream Channel
A stream is a body of water[1] with surface water flowing within the bed and banks of a channel. The stream encompasses surface and groundwater fluxes that respond to geological, geomorphological, hydrological and biotic controls[2]. Depending on its location or certain characteristics, a stream may be referred to by a variety of local or regional names. Streams are important as conduits in the water cycle, instruments in groundwater recharge, and corridors for fish and wildlife migration. The biological habitat in the immediate vicinity of a stream is called a riparian zone. Given the status of the ongoing Holocene extinction, streams play an important corridor role in connecting fragmented habitats and thus in conserving biodiversity
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Stream Bed
A stream bed is the channel bottom of a stream, river or creek, the physical confine of the normal water flow. The lateral confines or channel margins are known as the stream banks or river banks, during all but flood stage. Under certain conditions a river can branch from one stream bed to multiple stream beds.[1] A flood occurs when a stream overflows its banks and flows onto its flood plain. As a general rule, the bed is the part of the channel up to the normal water line, and the banks are that part above the normal water line. However, because water flow varies, this differentiation is subject to local interpretation
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Stream Bank
In geography, the word bank generally refers to the land alongside a body of water. Different structures are referred to as banks in different fields of geography, as follows. In limnology (the study of inland waters), a stream bank or river bank is the terrain alongside the bed of a river, creek, or stream.[1] The bank consists of the sides of the channel, between which the flow is confined.[1] Stream
Stream
banks are of particular interest in fluvial geography, which studies the processes associated with rivers and streams and the deposits and landforms created by them. Bankfull discharge is a discharge great enough to fill the channel and overtop the banks.[2] The descriptive terms left bank and right bank are relative to an observer looking downstream, in which the right bank is to the observer's right; a famous example is the naming of the two sides of the Seine
Seine
in Paris
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Floodplain
A floodplain or flood plain is an area of land adjacent to a stream or river which stretches from the banks of its channel to the base of the enclosing valley walls and which experiences flooding during periods of high discharge.[1] The soils usually consist of levees, silts, and sands deposited during floods. Levees are the heaviest materials (usually pebble-size) and they are deposited first; silts and sands are finer materials.Contents1 Formation 2 Ecology 3 Interaction with society 4 See also 5 References5.1 Notes 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksFormation[edit] Floodplains are made by a meander eroding sideways as it travels downstream. When a river breaks its banks, it leaves behind layers of alluvium (silt). These gradually build up to create the floor of the plain. Floodplains generally contain unconsolidated sediments, often extending below the bed of the stream
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Flood
A flood is an overflow of water that submerges land that is usually dry.[1] The European Union
European Union
(EU) Floods Directive defines a flood as a covering by water of land not normally covered by water.[2] In the sense of "flowing water", the word may also be applied to the inflow of the tide. Floods are an area of study of the discipline hydrology and are of significant concern in agriculture, civil engineering and public health. Flooding may occur as an overflow of water from water bodies, such as a river, lake, or ocean, in which the water overtops or breaks levees, resulting in some of that water escaping its usual boundaries,[3] or it may occur due to an accumulation of rainwater on saturated ground in an areal flood
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Valleys
A valley is a low area between hills or mountains often with a river running through it. In geology, a valley or dale is a depression that is longer than it is wide
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Plain
In geography, a plain is a flat, sweeping landmass that generally does not change much in elevation. Plains occur as lowlands along the bottoms of valleys or on the doorsteps of mountains, as coastal plains, and as plateaus or uplands.[1] In a valley, a plain is enclosed on two sides but in other cases a plain may be delineated by a complete or partial ring of hills, by mountains or cliffs. Where a geological region contains more than one plain, they may be connected by a pass (sometimes termed a gap). Coastal plains would mostly rise from sea level until they run into elevated features such as mountains or plateaus.[2] Plains are one of the major landforms on earth, where they are present on all continents, and would cover more than one-third of the world’s land area.[3] Plains may have been formed from flowing lava, deposited by water, ice, wind, or formed by erosion by these agents from hills and mountains
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Bohol
Bohol
Bohol
/boʊˈhoʊl/ is a 1st provincial income class island province of the Philippines
Philippines
located in the Central Visayas
Central Visayas
region, consisting of the island itself and 75 minor surrounding islands.[6] Its capital is Tagbilaran
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Canyons
A canyon (Spanish: cañón; archaic British English
British English
spelling: cañon)[1] or gorge is a deep cleft between escarpments or cliffs resulting from weathering and the erosive activity of a river over geologic timescales.[2] Rivers have a natural tendency to cut through underlying surfaces, eventually wearing away rock layers as sediments are removed downstream. A river bed will gradually reach a baseline elevation, which is the same elevation as the body of water into which the river drains. The processes of weathering and erosion will form canyons when the river's headwaters and estuary are at significantly different elevations,[3] particularly through regions where softer rock layers are intermingled with harder layers more resistant to weathering. A canyon may also refer to a rift between two mountain peaks, such as those in ranges including the Rocky Mountains, the Alps, the Himalayas or the Andes
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