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Trellick Tower
Trellick Tower is Grade II* listed tower block on the Cheltenham Estate in Kensal Town, London. Opened in 1972, it had been commissioned by the Greater London Council and designed in the Brutalist style by architect Ernő Goldfinger. The tower was planned to replace outdated social accommodation, and designed as a follow up to Goldfinger's earlier Balfron Tower in East London. It was the last major project he worked on, and featured various space-saving designs, along with a separate access tower containing a plant room. High-rise apartments and Brutalist architecture were falling out of favour by the time the tower was completed, and it became a magnet for crime, vandalism, drug abuse and prostitution. Its fortunes gradually improved in the 1980s after the establishment of a residents' association. Security measures were put in place and a concierge was employed, which led to lower crime levels
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Ben Wheatley
Ben Wheatley (born 1972) is an English director of feature films, TV comedy shows, adverts and idents, animated shorts and internet ads.

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Intercom

A butler uses an intercom on behalf of a lady
An intercom (intercommunication device), talkback or doorphone is a stand-alone voice communications system for use within a building or small collection of buildings, functioning independently of the public telephone network (Azori 2016). Intercoms are generally mounted permanently in buildings and vehicles. Intercoms can incorporate connections to public address loudspeaker systems, walkie talkies, telephones, and to other intercom systems. Some intercom systems incorporate control of devices such as signal lights and door latches. There are simple house intercoms and intercoms developed for collective apartments. Some are equipped with video, and its wiring (electrical installation), can be connected to the outside with few pairs (4-6 pairs) while controlling an electric strike
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London Buses Route 23

London Buses route 23 is a Transport for London contracted bus route in London, England
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Poplar, London
Poplar is a mainly residential district of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, East London, about 5.5 miles (8.9 km) east of Charing Cross. Poplar includes the sub-district of Blackwall and also, historically at least, the Isle of Dogs, as well as the historic council estate known as the Lansbury Estate. The area takes its name from the Black Poplar tree, a large and very rare species that once thrived in the wet conditions which the Thames and Lea formerly brought to much of the neighbourhood. Originally part of the parish of Stepney, Middlesex, Poplar became a civil parish in 1817. In 1855 Poplar joined with neighbouring Bromley and Bow to form the Poplar District of the Metropolis
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Hot Water Storage Tank
A hot water storage tank (also called a hot water tank, thermal storage tank, hot water thermal storage unit, heat storage tank and hot water cylinder) is a water tank used for storing hot water for space heating or domestic use. Water is a convenient heat storage medium because it has a high specific heat capacity. This means, compared to other substances, it can store more heat per unit of weight. Water is non-toxic and low cost. An efficiently insulated tank can retain stored heat for days, reducing fuel costs. Hot water tanks may have a built-in gas or oil burner system, electric immersion heaters. Some types use an external heat exchanger such as a central heating system, or heated water from another energy source
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1973 Oil Crisis
The 1973 oil crisis began in October 1973 when the members of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries proclaimed an oil embargo. The embargo was targeted at nations perceived as supporting Israel during the Yom Kippur War. The initial nations targeted were Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and the United States with the embargo also later extended to Portugal, Rhodesia and South Africa. By the end of the embargo in March 1974, the price of oil had risen from US$3 per barrel to nearly $12 globally; US prices were significantly higher
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London County Council
London County Council (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London throughout its existence from 1889 to 1965, and the first London-wide general municipal authority to be directly elected. It covered the area today known as Inner London and was replaced by the Greater London Council
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West Indies
The West Indies is a region of the North Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean that includes the island countries and surrounding waters of three major archipelagos: the Greater Antilles, the Lesser Antilles, and the Lucayan Archipelago. The region includes all the islands in or bordering the Caribbean Sea, plus The Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands, which are in the Atlantic Ocean
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Public Order Crime
In criminology, public-order crime is defined by Siegel (2004) as "crime which involves acts that interfere with the operations of society and the ability of people to function efficiently", i.e., it is behaviour that has been labelled criminal because it is contrary to shared norms, social values, and customs. Robertson (1989:123) maintains a crime is nothing more than "an act that contravenes a law". Generally speaking, deviancy is criminalized when it is too disruptive and has proved uncontrollable through informal sanctions. Public order crime should be distinguished from political crime. In the former, although the identity of the "victim" may be indirect and sometimes diffuse, it is cumulatively the community that suffers, whereas in a political crime, the state perceives itself to be the victim and criminalizes the behaviour it considers threatening. Thus, public order crime includes consensual crime and victimless crime
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BASE Jumping
BASE jumping, also sometimes written as B.A.S.E. jumping, is parachuting or wingsuit flying from a fixed structure or cliff. "BASE" is an acronym that stands for four categories of fixed objects from which one can jump: building, antenna, span, and Earth (cliff). Due to the lower altitudes of the jumps, BASE jumping is significantly more dangerous than skydiving from a plane. In the U.S., BASE jumping is currently regarded by many as a fringe extreme sport or stunt. In some jurisdictions or locations, BASE jumping is prohibited or illegal; however, in some places it is permitted such as Perrine Bridge in Twin Falls, Idaho
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Hammersmith & City Line
The Hammersmith & City line is a London Underground line that runs between Hammersmith in west London and Barking in east London. Coloured pale pink on the Tube map, it serves 29 stations over 15.8 miles (25.5 km). Between Farringdon and Aldgate East it skirts the City of London, the capital's financial heart, hence the line's name. Its tunnels are just below the surface and are a similar size to those on British main lines. Most of the track and all stations are shared with either the District, Circle or Metropolitan lines, the other parts of London Underground's sub-surface railway, and over 114 million passenger journeys are made each year on the Hammersmith & City and Circle lines. In 1863, the Metropolitan Railway began the world's first underground railway service between Paddington and Farringdon with wooden carriages and steam locomotives
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British Parachute Association
The British Parachute Association (BPA) is the national governing body for sport parachuting in the United Kingdom.

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Right To Buy Scheme
The Right to Buy scheme is a policy in the United Kingdom (with the exception of Scotland since August 1, 2016) which gives secure tenants of councils and some housing associations the legal right to buy, at a large discount, the council house they are living in. There is also a Right to Acquire for assured tenants of housing association homes built with public subsidy after 1997, at a smaller discount. About 1,500,000 homes in the UK have been sold in this manner since the introduction of the scheme in 1980. Supporters claim that the programme has given millions of households a tangible asset, secured their families' finances and—by releasing cash to repay local authority debt—helped improve the public finances.

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