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Toothpaste
Toothpaste
Toothpaste
is a paste or gel dentifrice used with a toothbrush as an accessory to clean and maintain the aesthetics and health of teeth. Toothpaste
Toothpaste
is used to promote oral hygiene: it serves as
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Apricot
An apricot is a fruit, or the tree that bears the fruit, of several species in the genus Prunus
Prunus
(stone fruits). Usually, an apricot tree is from the species P. armeniaca, but the species P. brigantina, P. mandshurica, P. mume, and P. sibirica are closely related, have similar fruit, and are also called apricots.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Cultivation and uses3.1 History 3.2 Cultivation practices 3.3 Pests and diseases4 Production 5 Nutrition5.1 Dried apricots 5.2 Phytochemicals6 In culture 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEtymology[edit] The scientific name armeniaca was first used by Gaspard Bauhin
Gaspard Bauhin
in his Pinax Theatri Botanici (1623), referring to the species as Mala armeniaca "Armenian apple"
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Zeolite
Zeolites are microporous, aluminosilicate minerals commonly used as commercial adsorbents and catalysts.[1] The term zeolite was originally coined in 1756 by Swedish mineralogist Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, who observed that rapidly heating the material, believed to have been stilbite, produced large amounts of steam from water that had been adsorbed by the material. Based on this, he called the material zeolite, from the Greek ζέω (zéō), meaning "to boil" and λίθος (líthos), meaning "stone".[2] The classic reference for the field has been Breck's book Zeolite
Zeolite
Molecular Sieves: Structure, Chemistry, And Use.[3] Zeolites occur naturally but are also produced industrially on a large scale
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Anise
Anise
Anise
(/ˈænɪs/;[3] Pimpinella
Pimpinella
anisum), also called aniseed,[4] is a flowering plant in the family
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Cinnamon
Cinnamon
Cinnamon
(/ˈsɪnəmən/ SIN-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavoring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savoury dishes, breakfast cereals, snackfoods, and traditional foods. The aroma and flavor of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
sticks, powder, and dried flowers of the Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum plant Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum, from Koehler's Medicinal-Plants (1887)Close-up view of raw cinnamonThe term "cinnamon" also is used to describe its mid-brown colour. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is the name for several species of trees and the commercial spice products that some of them produce
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Flavor
Flavor (American English) or flavour (British English; see spelling differences) is the sensory impression of food or other substance, and is determined primarily by the chemical senses of taste and smell. The "trigeminal senses", which detect chemical irritants in the mouth and throat, as well as temperature and texture, are also important to the overall gestalt of flavor perception. The flavor of the food, as such, can be altered with natural or artificial flavorants which affect these senses. A "flavorant" is defined as a substance that gives another substance flavor, altering the characteristics of the solute, causing it to become sweet, sour, tangy, etc.[citation needed]. A flavor is a quality of something that affects the sense of taste.[1] Of the three chemical senses, smell is the main determinant of a food item's flavor
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Food Coloring
Food
Food
coloring, or color additive, is any dye, pigment or substance that imparts color when it is added to food or drink. They come in many forms consisting of liquids, powders, gels, and pastes. Food coloring is used both in commercial food production and in domestic cooking
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Zinc Chloride
Zinc chloride
Zinc chloride
is the name of chemical compounds with the formula ZnCl2 and its hydrates. Zinc chlorides, of which nine crystalline forms are known, are colorless or white, and are highly soluble in water.[citation needed] ZnCl2 itself is hygroscopic and even deliquescent. Samples should therefore be protected from sources of moisture, including the water vapor present in ambient air. Zinc chloride finds wide application in textile processing, metallurgical fluxes, and chemical synthesis
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Lavender
Lavandula
Lavandula
(common name lavender) is a genus of 47 known species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World
Old World
and is found from Cape Verde
Cape Verde
and the Canary Islands, Europe across to northern and eastern Africa, the Mediterranean, southwest Asia to southeast India. Many members of the genus are cultivated extensively in temperate climates as ornamental plants for garden and landscape use, for use as culinary herbs, and also commercially for the extraction of essential oils
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Parts Per Million
In science and engineering, the parts-per notation is a set of pseudo-units to describe small values of miscellaneous dimensionless quantities, e.g. mole fraction or mass fraction. Since these fractions are quantity-per-quantity measures, they are pure numbers with no associated units of measurement. Commonly used are ppm (parts-per-million, 10−6), ppb (parts-per-billion, 10−9), ppt (parts-per-trillion, 10−12) and ppq (parts-per-quadrillion, 10−15). This notation is not part of the SI system and its meaning is ambiguous.Contents1 Overview1.1 In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy2 Parts-per expressions 3 Criticism3.1 Long and short scales 3.2 Thousand
Thousand
vs. trillion 3.3 Mass fraction vs. mole fraction vs
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Neem
Azadirachta
Azadirachta
indica, commonly known as neem, nimtree or Indian lilac,[2] is a tree in the mahogany family Meliaceae. It is one of two species in the genus Azadirachta, and is native to the Indian subcontinent, i.e. India, Nepal, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Maldives
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Ginger
Ginger
Ginger
( Zingiber
Zingiber
officinale) is a flowering plant whose rhizome, ginger root or simply ginger, is widely used as a spice or a folk medicine.[2] It is a herbaceous perennial which grows annual pseudostems (false stems made of the rolled bases of leaves) about a meter tall bearing narrow leaf blades. The inflorescences bear pale yellow with purple flowers and arise directly from the rhizome on separate shoots.[3] Ginger
Ginger
is in the family Zingiberaceae, to which also belong turmeric (Curcuma longa), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum), and galangal
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Vanilla
Vanilla
Vanilla
is a flavoring derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla, primarily from the Mexican species, flat-leaved vanilla (V. planifolia). The word vanilla, derived from vainilla, the diminutive of the Spanish word vaina (vaina itself meaning sheath or pod), is translated simply as "little pod".[1] Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican
Mesoamerican
people cultivated the vine of the vanilla orchid, called tlilxochitl by the Aztecs. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés
Hernán Cortés
is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe in the 1520s.[2] Pollination
Pollination
is required to set the vanilla fruit from which the flavoring is derived
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Lemon
The lemon, Citrus
Citrus
limon (L.) Osbeck, is a species of small evergreen tree in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, native to Asia. The tree's ellipsoidal yellow fruit is used for culinary and non-culinary purposes throughout the world, primarily for its juice, which has both culinary and cleaning uses.[2] The pulp and rind (zest) are also used in cooking and baking
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Orange (fruit)
The orange is the fruit of the citrus species Citrus
Citrus
× sinensis in the family Rutaceae.[1] It is also called sweet orange, to distinguish it from the related Citrus
Citrus
× aurantium, referred to as bitter orange. The sweet orange reproduces asexually (apomixis through nucellar embryony); varieties of sweet orange arise through mutations.[2] The orange is a hybrid between pomelo ( Citrus
Citrus
maxima) and mandarin ( Citrus
Citrus
reticulata).[2][3] The chloroplast genome, and therefore the maternal line, is that of pomelo.[4] The sweet orange has had its full genome sequenced.[2] Sweet
Sweet
oranges were mentioned in Chinese literature in 314 BC.[2] As of 1987[update], orange trees were found to be the most cultivated fruit tree in the world.[5] Orange trees are widely grown in tropical and subtropical climates for their sweet fruit
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Bubblegum
Bubble gum
Bubble gum
is a type of chewing gum, designed to be inflated out of the mouth as a bubble.Contents1 History 2 Flavors 3 Records 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory In 1928, Walter Diemer, an accountant for the Fleer
Fleer
Chewing Gum Company in Philadelphia, was experimenting with new gum recipes. One recipe was found to be less sticky than regular chewing gum, and stretched more easily. This gum became highly successful and was eventually named by the president of Fleer
Fleer
as Dubble Bubble
Dubble Bubble
because of its stretchy texture. The original bubble gum was pink in color because that was the dye that Diemer had most on hand at the time.[1] In modern chewing gum, if natural rubber such as chicle is used, it must pass several purity and cleanliness tests. However, most modern types of chewing gum use synthetic gum based materials
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