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Thuparamaya
Thuparamaya
Thuparamaya
is an ancient Buddhist temple
Buddhist temple
in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka. Located in the sacred area of Mahamewna park, the
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Ceylon Today
Ceylon Today
Ceylon Today
is an English language
English language
Sri Lankan daily newspaper published by Ceylon Newspapers (Private) Limited. It was founded in 2011 and is published from Colombo. Its sister newspaper is the Mawbima. Ceylon Newspapers (Private) Limited is owned by politician Tiran Alles.[1] The first edition of the newspaper was published on 18 November 2011.[2] Editor in chief Lalith Allahakkoon was sacked on 13 June 2012.[3] His replacement was Hana Ibrahim. Ibrahim was a former treasurer of the Free Media Movement (FMM) and tried to prevent the FMM from reacting to Allahakkoon's sacking.[4] Ibrahim later resigned from the FMM.[5] References[edit]^ "Cold war between Govt. and Judiciary continues". The Sunday Times (Sri Lanka). 7 October 2012.  ^ "About Us". Ceylon Today
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Aggabodhi II Of Anuradhapura
Aggabodhi II was King of Anuradhapura
King of Anuradhapura
in the 7th century, whose reign lasted from 598 to 608[citation needed]
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Gajabahu I Of Anuradhapura
Gajabahu I (lit. 'Elephant-Arm'), also known as Gajabahuka Gamani (c. 114 – 136 CE) was a Sinhalese king of Rajarata
Rajarata
in Sri Lanka. He is renowned for his religious benefactions, extensive involvement in south Indian politics, and for possibly introducing the cult of the goddess Pattini
Pattini
to Sri Lanka. The primary source for his reign is the Mahavamsa, though he is also the only early Sri Lankan king (along with Elara) to be extensively mentioned in the Chera Cilappatikaram (also spelled Silapathikaram).[1][2]Contents1 Life and Religion 2 Guest 3 Significance 4 Trade 5 Popular culture 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 References 9 External linksLife and Religion[edit] Next to nothing is known about Gajabahu's youth, except that he was son of Vankanasika Tissa (reigned 110-113), king of Rajarata
Rajarata
from Anuradhapura, and his consort Mahamatta
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Bhikku
A bhikkhu (from Pali, Sanskrit: bhikṣu) is an ordained male monastic ("monk") in Buddhism.[1] Male and female monastics ("nun", bhikkhuni ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
bhikṣuṇī)) are members of the Buddhist community.[2] The lives of all Buddhist monastics are governed by a set of rules called the prātimokṣa or pātimokkha.[1] Their lifestyles are shaped to support their spiritual practice: to live a simple and meditative life and attain nirvana.[3] A person under the age of 20 cannot be ordained as a bhikkhu or bhikkhuni but can be ordained as a śrāmaṇera or śrāmaṇērī.Contents1 Definition 2 Historical
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Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
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Chaitya
A chaitya, chaitya hall, chaitya-griha, or caitya refers to a shrine, sanctuary, temple or prayer hall in Indian religions.[1][2] The term is most common in Buddhism, where it includes a stupa at one end.[3] Strictly, the chaitya is actually the stupa itself,[4] and the Indian buildings are chaitya halls, but this distinction is often not observed. Outside India, the term is used by Buddhists for local styles of small stupa-like monuments in Nepal, Cambodia, Indonesia
Indonesia
and elsewhere. In the historical texts of Jainism
Jainism
and Hinduism, including those relating to architecture, chaitya refers to a temple, sanctuary or any sacred monument.[5][6][7] Most early examples of chaitya that survive are Indian rock-cut architecture, but it is agreed that the standard form follows a tradition of free-standing halls made of wood and other plant materials, none of which have survived
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Theravada
Theravāda
Theravāda
(/ˌθɛrəˈvɑːdə/; Pali, literally "school of the elder monks") is a branch of Buddhism
Buddhism
that uses the Buddha's teaching preserved in the Pāli Canon
Pāli Canon
as its doctrinal core
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Ashoka
Ashoka
Ashoka
(English: /əˈʃoʊkə/; IAST: Aśoka; died 232 BCE)[5], or Ashoka
Ashoka
the Great, was an Indian emperor of the Maurya Dynasty, who ruled almost all of the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
from c. 268 to 232 BCE.[6] He was the grandson of the founder of the Maurya Dynasty, Chandragupta Maurya, who had created one of the largest empires in ancient India
India
and then, according to Jain sources, renounced it all to become a Jain monk.[7] One of India's greatest emperors, Ashoka expanded Chandragupta's empire, and reigned over a realm that stretched from present-day Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in the west to Bangladesh
Bangladesh
in the east. It covered the entire Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
except for parts of present-day Tamil Nadu, Karnataka
Karnataka
and Kerala
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Mahinda (buddhist Monk)
Mahinda ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
Mahendra; born third century BCE in Ujjain, modern Madhya Pradesh, India) was a Buddhist monk depicted in Buddhist sources as bringing Buddhism
Buddhism
to Sri Lanka.[1] He was the first-born son of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka
Ashoka
from his wife Devi and the elder brother of Sanghamitra. Ashoka
Ashoka
named him Mahendra, meaning "conqueror of the world". But Mahendra, inspired by his mother, became a Buddhist monk.Contents1 Historical sources 2 Biography 3 Significance and legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistorical sources[edit] The Dipavamsa
Dipavamsa
and the Mahavamsa, Sri Lanka's two great religious chronicles, contain accounts of Mahinda travelling to Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and converting King Devanampiyatissa.[2] These are the primary sources for accounts of his life and deeds
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List Of Archaeological Protected Monuments In Sri Lanka
The archaeological heritage of Sri Lanka is divided in to three ages as Prehistoric (Stone age), Protohistoric (Iron age) and historical periods. The presence of man activities in Sri Lanka probably dates from 75,000 years ago (late Pleistocene
Pleistocene
period). Prehistoric sites which are presently identified in the country are distributed from the maritime belt and the lowland plains of the wet and dry zones to the high plateaus and rain forest in the central and south western mountain region of the island. The protohistoric period expands from about 1000 BC to the historical period at about 500 BC
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Government Of Sri Lanka
A government is the system or group of people governing an organized community, often a state.[1] In the case of its broad associative definition, government normally consists of legislature, executive, and judiciary. Government
Government
is a means by which state policies are enforced, as well as a mechanism for determining the policy. Each government has a kind of constitution, a statement of its governing principles and philosophy. Typically the philosophy chosen is some balance between the principle of individual freedom and the idea of absolute state authority (tyranny). While all types of organizations have governance, the word government is often used more specifically to refer to the approximately 200 independent national governments on Earth, as well as subsidiary organizations.[2] Historically prevalent forms of government include aristocracy, timocracy, oligarchy, democracy, theocracy and tyranny
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Wijeya Newspapers
Wijeya Newspapers Limited (WNL) is a Sri Lankan media company which publishes a number of national newspapers and magazines. Formerly known as Wijeya Publications Limited, WNL was founded in 1979 by Ranjith Wijewardene, son of medial mogul D. R. Wijewardena.[1][2] Ranjith Wijewardene had been chairman of Associated Newspapers of Ceylon Limited before it was taken over by the government in July 1973.[3] Ranjith Wijewardene bought the trade names and library of the Times of Ceylon Limited (TOCL) group after it closed down in January 1985.[2] He subsequently started various newspapers using the names of former TOCL publications: Irida Lankadeepa
Irida Lankadeepa
(1986), Sunday Times (1987), Lankadeepa
Lankadeepa
(1991) and Midweek Mirror
Midweek Mirror
(1995).[2][4] The Midweek Mirror became the Daily Mirror in 1999
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Buddhist Temple
A Buddhist temple
Buddhist temple
is the place of worship for Buddhists, the followers of Buddhism. They include the structures called vihara, stupa, wat and pagoda in different regions and languages. Temples in Buddhism represent the pure land or pure environment of a Buddha. Traditional Buddhist temples are designed to inspire inner and outer peace.[1] Its structure and architecture varies from region to region. Usually, the temple consists not only of its buildings, but also the surrounding environment
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