HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Theravada
Theravāda (/ˌθɛrəˈvɑːdə/; Pali, literally "school of the elder monks") is a branch of Buddhism that uses the Buddha's teaching preserved in the Pāli Canon as its doctrinal core. The Pali canon is the only complete Buddhist canon which survives in a classical Indic Language, Pali, which serves as the sacred language and lingua franca of Theravada Buddhism. Another feature of Theravada is its tendency to be very conservative with regard to matters of doctrine and monastic discipline. As a distinct sect, Theravada Buddhism developed in Sri Lanka and spread to the rest of Southeast Asia. Theravāda also includes a rich diversity of traditions and practices that have developed over its long history of interactions with varying cultures and religious communities
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Buddhism In India
Buddhism is a world religion, which arose in and around the ancient Kingdom of Magadha (now in Bihar, India), and is based on the teachings of Siddhārtha Gautama who was deemed a "Buddha" ("Awakened One"). Buddhism spread outside of Magadha starting in the Buddha's lifetime. With the reign of the Buddhist Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, the Buddhist community split into two branches: the Mahāsāṃghika and the Sthaviravāda, each of which spread throughout India and split into numerous sub-sects. In modern times, two major branches of Buddhism exist: the Theravāda in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, and the Mahāyāna throughout the Himalayas and East Asia. The practice of Buddhism as a distinct and organized religion lost influence after the Gupta reign (c.7th century CE), and declined from the land of its origin in around 13th century, but not without leaving a significant impact
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Abhidhammattha-sangaha
Abhidhammattha-sangaha (Pali) is a Buddhist text attributed to Acariya Anuruddha; it is a commentary on the Abhidharma of the Theravada tradition. Abhidhamma is literally known as Higher Doctrine, Aththa is used here to represent English multi-significant word Thing (Not Meaning) and Sangaha simply means Compendium. It briefly mentions, in order, the seven treatises (Prakaranas) of the Abhidhamma Pitaka: The prefix Abhi is used in the sense of preponderant, great, excellent, sublime, distinct, etc
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Dharmachakra
The dharmachakra (IAST: dharmacakra; Pali dhammacakka; "Wheel of the Dharma") is one of the Ashtamangala of Indian religions such as Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Parakramabahu I
Parākramabāhu I (Pali Mahā Parākaramabāhu 1123–1186) was king of the Kingdom of Polonnaruwa from 1153-86. During his reign from the capital city of Polonnaruwa, he unified the three lesser kingdoms of the island, becoming one of the last monarchs in Sri Lankan history to do so. He oversaw the expansion and beautification of his capital, constructed extensive irrigation systems, reorganized the country's army, reformed Buddhist practices, encouraged the arts and undertook military campaigns in South India and Burma. The adage "not even a little water that comes from the rain must flow into the ocean without being made useful to man" is one of his most famous utterances. Parākramabāhu spent much of his youth in the courts of his uncles Kitti Sri Megha, Prince of Dakkinadesa, and Sri Vallabha, Prince of Ruhuna respectively, as well as in the court of the King of Rajarata, Gajabahu II
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Sanghamitta
Saṅghamittā (Saṅghamitrā in Sanskrit) was the eldest daughter of Emperor Ashoka (304 BC – 232 BC) and his first wife, Devi. Together with her brother Mahinda, she entered an order of Buddhist monks. The two siblings later went to Sri Lanka to spread the teachings of Buddha at the request of King Devanampiya Tissa (250 BC – 210 BC) who was a contemporary of Ashoka. Ashoka was initially reluctant to send his daughter on an overseas mission. However, because of the insistence of Sangamitra herself, he finally agreed
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Fourth Buddhist Council
Fourth Buddhist Council is the name of two separate Buddhist council meetings. The first one was held in the 1st century BC, in Sri Lanka. In this fourth Buddhist council the Theravadin Pali Canon was for the first time committed to writing, on palm leaves
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Three Jewels
สรณะ, ที่พึ่ง ที่ระลึก RTGSsarana, thi phueng thi raluek
Vietnamese Quy y
Glossary of Buddhism
Buddhists take refuge in the Three Jewels or Triple Gem (also known as the "Three Refuges"). The Three Jewels are: Refuge is common to all major schools of Buddhism
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Kammaṭṭhāna
In Buddhism, kammaṭṭhāna is a Pali word (Sanskrit: karmasthana) which literally means the place of work. Its original meaning was someone's occupation (farming, trading, cattle-tending, etc.). It has several distinct but related usages, all having to do with Buddhist meditation. Its most basic meaning is as a word for meditation. In Burma senior meditation practitioners are known as "kammatthanacariyas" (meditation masters)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Vibhajjavada
Vibhajyavāda (
Sanskrit; Pāli: Vibhajjavāda; traditional Chinese: 分別說部; ; pinyin: fēnbiéshuō-bù) was a group of Sthavira Buddhist schools of early Buddhism, who rejected the Sarvastivada teachings at the Third Buddhist council (ca
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Mahinda (buddhist Monk)
Mahinda (Sanskrit Mahendra; born third century BCE in Ujjain, modern Madhya Pradesh, India) was a Buddhist monk depicted in Buddhist sources as bringing Buddhism to Sri Lanka. He was the first-born son of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka from his wife Devi and the elder brother of Sanghamitra. Ashoka named him Mahendra, meaning "conqueror of the world"
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Anagarika Dharmapala
Anagārika Dharmapāla (Pali: Anagārika, [əˈnəɡɑːrɪkə]; Sinhalese: Anagarika, lit., Sinhalese: අනගාරික ධර්මපාල; 17 September 1864 – 29 April 1933) was a Sri Lankan (Sinhalese) Buddhist revivalist and writer. He was the first global Buddhist missionary. He was one of the founding contributors of non-violent Sinhalese Buddhist nationalism and Buddhism. He was also a pioneer in the revival of Buddhism in India after it had been virtually extinct there for several centuries, and he was the first Buddhist in modern times to preach the Dharma in three continents: Asia, North America, and Europe. Along with Henry Steel Olcott and Helena Blavatsky, the creators of the Theosophical Society, he was a major reformer and revivalist of Sinhala Buddhism and an important figure in its western transmission. He also inspired a mass movement of South Indian Dalits including Tamils to embrace Buddhism, half a century before
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Samsara (Buddhism)
Saṃsāra (Sanskrit, Pali; also samsara) in Buddhism is the beginning-less cycle of repeated birth, mundane existence and dying again.