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Flag Of Samoa
The flag of Samoa (Samoan: fu‘a o Sāmoa) was first adopted from February 24, 1949 for UN Trusteeships, and continuously applied for the state's independence on January 1, 1962. It consists of a red field with a blue rectangle in the canton. The blue rectangle bears the constellation Southern Cross: four large white stars and one smaller star. Prior to the First World War, Samoa was a colony of the German Empire. German colonies used the flag of the Imperial Colonial Office, a black-white-red tricolour defaced with the Imperial Eagle. The Imperial German government intended to introduce specific flags for the colonies (also based on the tricolour) and several proposals were created, but the war and the subsequent loss of all overseas territories prevented their official adoption
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Samoan Language

Samoan (Gagana faʻa Sāmoa or Gagana Sāmoa; IPA: [ŋaˈŋana ˈsaːmʊa]) is the language of the Samoan Islands, comprising Samoa and the United States territory of American Samoa. It is an official language, alongside English, in both jurisdictions. Samoan, a Polynesian language, is the first language for most of the Samoa Islands' population of about 246,000 people. With many Samoan people living in other countries, the total number of speakers worldwide is estimated at 510,000 in 2015
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Ko E Iki He Lagi
"Ko e Iki he Lagi" (English: The Lord in Heaven), also titled in English as "Lord in heaven, Thou art merciful",[1] is the national anthem of Niue. It was adopted in 1974 when Niue became a self-governing state. During Niue's history as a territory of New Zealand, the national anthem of Niue was New Zealand's "God Defend New Zealand". "God Save the Queen" was also used and is still used as the royal anthem for the Monarchy of New Zealand. "Ko e Iki he Lagi" was created before the 1970s. It is not known who wrote it but it is known that it was prepared by Sioeli Fusikata.[2][3] When it was written, it had become a popular song on Niue but the opportunity rarely arose for people to perform it publicly. In the 1963 South Pacific Games, Niue used the Flag of New Zealand as the flag to represent them in keeping with the rest of the colonies of the British Empire not using the Union Jack at the games
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