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The Ronettes 1966
The Ronettes (/ˌrɒˈnɛts/) were an American girl group from New York City. One of the most popular groups from the 1960s, they placed nine songs on the Billboard Hot 100, five of which became Top 40 hits. The trio from Spanish Harlem, New York, consisted of lead singer Veronica Bennett (later known as Ronnie Spector), her older sister Estelle Bennett, and their cousin Nedra Talley. Among the Ronettes' most famous songs are "Be My Baby", "Baby, I Love You", "(The Best Part of) Breakin' Up", and " The Ronettes
The Ronettes
song)">Walking in the Rain", all of which charted on the Billboard Hot 100
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Historic colonies
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Red Red Robin
"When the Red, Red Robin (Comes Bob, Bob, Bobbin' Along)" was a 1926 popular song written, both words and music, by Harry Woods
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Presenting The Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica
Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes Featuring Veronica is the debut album of American girl group the Ronettes, released in 1964. Comprising numerous singles produced by Phil Spector since the previous year, it was at #96 on the Billboard 200 chart. Issued singles included "Be My Baby" (US #2), "Walking in the Rain" (US #23), "Baby, I Love You" (US #24), "Do I Love You?" (US #34), and "(The Best Part Of) Breakin' Up" (US #39)
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Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone is an American monthly magazine that focuses on popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco, California in 1967 by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine's publisher, and the music critic Ralph J. Gleason. It was first known for its musical coverage and for political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson. In the 1990s, the magazine shifted focus to a younger readership interested in youth-oriented television shows, film actors, and popular music. In recent years, it has resumed its traditional mix of content. Rolling Stone Press is the magazine's associated book publishing imprint. Straight Arrow Press was the magazine's associated book publishing imprint, Straight Arrow Publishing Co., Inc
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The 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time
"The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time" is a 2003 special issue of American biweekly magazine Rolling Stone, and a related book published in 2005. The lists presented were compiled based on votes from selected rock musicians, critics, and industry figures, and predominantly feature American and British music from the 1960s and the 1970s. In 2012, Rolling Stone published a revised edition of the list drawing on the original and a later survey of albums up until the early 2000s. It was made available in "bookazine" format on newsstands in the US from April 27 to July 25
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Vocal Group Hall Of Fame
The Vocal Group Hall of Fame (VGHF) was organized by Tony Butala, also the founder (and now only surviving original member) of the Lettermen, to honor outstanding vocal groups throughout the world. Headquartered in Sharon, Pennsylvania, United States, it includes a theater and a museum. The VGHF typically inducts sixteen artists annually. Unlike the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, artists are inducted within categories. Each category has at least one representative. The categories are 1940s, 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and duos. Only groups are eligible; solo artists may be inducted if they have a legitimate backing band with backing singers (for example, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers). The Vocal Group Hall of Fame releases a public ballot; allowing everyone to vote for both the nominees and the inductees. It was originally organized in 1998
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Washington Heights, Manhattan
Coordinates: 40°50′30″N 73°56′15″W / 40.84167°N 73.93750°W / 40.84167; -73.93750
Washington Heights seen from the west tower of the George Washington Bridge, the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge. Note Little Red Lighthouse at base of east tower.
The highest point on Manhattan is in Bennett Park in Washington Heights
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Cherokee
The Cherokee (/ˈɛrək/; Cherokee: ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ, translit. Aniyvwiyaʔi or Cherokee: ᏣᎳᎩ, translit. Tsalagi) are one of the indigenous peoples of the Southeastern Woodlands. Prior to the 18th century, they were concentrated in southwestern North Carolina, southeastern Tennessee, and the tips of western South Carolina and northeastern Georgia. The Cherokee language is part of the Iroquoian language group. In the 19th century, James Mooney, an American ethnographer, recorded one oral tradition that told of the tribe having migrated south in ancient times from the Great Lakes region, where other Iroquoian-speaking peoples lived; however, anthropologist Thomas R
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Irish-American
Irish Americans (Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are an ethnic group comprising Americans who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland, especially those who identify with that ancestry, along with their cultural characteristics. About 33 million Americans—10.5% of the total population—reported Irish ancestry in the 2013 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. This compares with a population of 6.4 million on the island of Ireland
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Puerto Rican People
Puerto Ricans (Spanish: Puertorriqueños; or boricuas) are people from Puerto Rico, the inhabitants and citizens of Puerto Rico, and their descendants
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Frankie Lymon And The Teenagers
The Teenagers are an American-Puerto Rican integrated doo wop group, most noted for being one of rock music's earliest successes, presented to international audiences by DJ Alan Freed
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Apollo Theatre
The Apollo Theatre is a Grade II listed West End theatre, on Shaftesbury Avenue in the City of Westminster, in central London. Designed by the architect Lewin Sharp for owner Henry Lowenfeld,

Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, located on the shore of Lake Erie in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, recognizes and archives the history of the best-known and most influential artists, producers, engineers, and other notable figures who have had some major influence on the development of rock and roll. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Foundation was established on April 20, 1983, by Atlantic Records founder and chairman Ahmet Ertegun
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Why Do Fools Fall In Love (song)
"Why Do Fools Fall in Love" is a song that was originally a hit for early New York City-based rock and roll group Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers in January 1956. It reached No. 1 on the R&B chart, No. 6 on Billboard's Pop Singles chart, and number 1 on the UK Singles Chart in July. The song helped to make Frankie Lymon a household name and would make him a rock and roll pioneer. The Canadian group The Diamonds also did a more traditional doo wop version that came out the week after Lymon's, in March 1956. This version stayed 19 weeks on the Billboard chart, topping out at No. 12. The song was ranked #314 on the Rolling Stone magazine's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. The song was the first hit recording made in the Bell Sound Studio in New York City
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