HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







picture info

Economy Of Equatorial Guinea
The economy of Equatorial Guinea has traditionally been dependent on commodities such as cocoa and coffee but is now heavily dependent on petroleum due to the discovery and exploitation of significant oil reserves in the 1980s.[11] Equatorial Guinea enjoys a purchasing power parity GDP per capita of more than US$38,699, which is the highest in Africa and the 31st highest in the world as of 2016. In 2017, it graduated from "Least Developed Country" status, the only Sub-Saharan African nation that managed to do so alongside Botswana. However, despite the economic growth and improving infrastructure, the country has been ranked only 138th out of 188 countries on the United Nations Human Development Index in 2015 and despite its impressive GNI figure, it is still plagued by extreme poverty because its Gini coefficient of 65.0 is the highest in the entire world
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Economy Of Gabon

Gabon depended on timber and manganese until oil was discovered offshore in the early 1970s. The oil sector now accounts for 50% of GDP and 80% of exports. Although there have been recent offshore finds,[12][13] oil production is now declining from its peak of 370,000 barrels per day (59,000 m3/d) in 1997, and periods of low oil prices have had a negative impact on government revenues and the economy. In 2012 there were six active oil rigs in Gabon.[14] The government announced in 2012 that it would reassess exactly how much iron ore the Belinga site contains before awarding the concession to a mining company, most likely to be China's CMEC, which temporarily secured the rights to the ore in 2007.[15] Overspending on the Trans-Gabon (Transgabonais) Railway and the France CFA devaluation of 1994 have caused debt problems
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Economy Of Iran

The country's major port of entry is Bandar-Abbas on the Strait of Hormuz. After arriving in Iran, imported goods are distributed by trucks and freight trains. The Tehran–Bandar-Abbas railroad, opened in 1995, connects Bandar-Abbas to Central Asia via Tehran and Mashhad. Other major ports include Bandar Anzali and Bandar Torkaman on the Caspian Sea and Khoramshahr and Bandar Imam Khomeini on the Persian Gulf. Dozens of cities have passenger and cargo airports. Iran Air, the national airline, was founded in 1962 and operates domestic and international flights. All large cities have bus transit systems and private companies provide intercity bus services. Tehran, Mashhad, Shiraz, Tabriz, Ahvaz and Isfahan are constructing underground railways
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Economy Of Iraq

Iraq is a founding member of OPEC.[56] Petroleum constitutes 99,7% of Iraq's exports with a value of $43,8 billion in 2016.[16] From the 1990s until 2003, the international trade embargo restricted Iraq's export activity almost exclusively to oil. IIraq is a founding member of OPEC.[56] Petroleum constitutes 99,7% of Iraq's exports with a value of $43,8 billion in 2016.[16] From the 1990s until 2003, the international trade embargo restricted Iraq's export activity almost exclusively to oil. In 2003 oil accounted for about US$7.4 billion of Iraq's total US$7.6 billion of export value, and statistics for earlier years showed similar proportions. After the end of the trade embargo in 2003 expanded the range of exports, oil continued to occupy the dominant position: in 2004 Iraq's export income doubled (to US$16.5 billion), but oil accounted for all but US$340 million (2 percent) of the total
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Economy Of Libya

The economy of Libya depends primarily on revenues from the petroleum sector, which represents over 95% of export earnings and 60% of GDP.[13] These oil revenues and a small population have given Libya one of the highest nominal per capita GDP in Africa.[14][13] After 2000, Libya recorded favourable growth rates with an estimated 10.6% growth of GDP in 2010. This development was interrupted by the Libyan Civil War, which resulted in contraction of the economy by 62.1% in 2011
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Economy Of The Republic Of The Congo

The economy of the Republic of the Congo is a mixture of subsistence hunting and agriculture, an industrial sector based largely on petroleum extraction and support services, and government spending[16] characterized by budget problems and overstaffing. Petroleum has supplanted forestry as the mainstay of the economy, providing a major share of government revenues and exports.[16] Nowadays the Republic of the Congo is increasingly converting natural gas to electricity rather than burning it, greatly improving energy prospects.[16]

Earlier in the 1990s, Congo's major employer was the state bureaucracy, which had a payroll of 80,000, which is enormous for a country of Congo's size
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Economy Of The United Arab Emirates

The economy of the United Arab Emirates (or UAE) is the second largest in the Middle East (after Saudi Arabia), with a gross domestic product (GDP) of US$414 billion (AED 1.52 trillion) in 2018. The UAE has been successfully diversifying its economy,[15] particularly in Dubai, but still remains heavily reliant on revenues from petroleum and natural gas, which continue to play a central role in its economy, especially in Abu Dhabi
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]