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Black Death
The Black Death, also known as the Black Plague, Great Plague or simply Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia and peaking in Europe from 1347 to 1351. The
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Black Death Migration
The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia and peaking in Europe from 1346 to 1353. Its migration followed the sea and land trading routes of the medieval world. This migration has been studied for centuries as an example of how the spread of contagious diseases is impacted by human society and economics. The disease is caused by Yersinia pestis, which is enzootic (commonly present) in populations of ground rodents in Central Asia. Morelli et al. (2010) reported the origin of the plague bacillus to be in China. An older theory places the first cases in the steppes of Central Asia, and others, such as the historian Michael W
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Theories Of The Black Death
Theories of the Black Death are a variety of explanations that have been advanced to explain the nature and transmission of the Black Death (1347–50). A number of epidemiologists and historians since the 1980s have challenged the traditional view that the Black Death was caused by plague based on the type and spread of the disease
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Consequences Of The Black Death
Consequences of the Black Death included a series of religious, social, and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1347 and 1350 with 30% to 50% of the population killed. It reduced world population from an estimated 450 million to between 350 and 375 million. It took 80 and in some areas more than 150 years for Europe's population to recover. From the perspective of many of the survivors, however, the impact after the plague was more happy, for their labor was in higher demand. Hilton has argued that those English peasants who survived found their situation to be much improved. For English peasants, the 15th century was a golden age of prosperity and new opportunities. The land was plentiful, wages high, and serfdom had all but disappeared
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Black Death Jewish Persecutions
The Black Death persecutions and massacres were a series of violent attacks on Jewish communities blamed for an outbreak of the Black Death in Europe from 1348 to 1351.

Black Death In Medieval Culture
The Black Death in medieval culture includes the impact of the Black Death (1347-1350) on art and literature throughout the generation that experienced it. Although contemporary chronicles are often regarded by historians as the most realistic portrayals of the Black Death, the effects of such a large-scale shared experience on the population of Europe influenced poetry, prose, stage works, music and artwork throughout the period, as evidenced by writers such as Chaucer, Boccaccio, Petrarch and artists such as
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Black Death In England
The Black Death was a pneumonic plague pandemic, which reached England in June 1348. It was the first and most severe manifestation of the Second Pandemic, caused by Yersinia pestis bacteria. The term "Black Death" was not used until the late 17th century. Originating in China, it spread west along the trade routes across Europe and arrived on the British Isles from the English province of Gascony. The plague seems to have been spread by flea-infected rats, as well as individuals who had been infected on the continent. Rats were the reservoir hosts of the Y. pestis bacteria and the Oriental rat flea was the primary vector. The first known case in England was a seaman who arrived at Weymouth, Dorset, from Gascony in June 1348. By autumn, the plague had reached London, and by summer 1349 it covered the entire country, before dying down by December
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