HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Taloyoak
Taloyoak
Taloyoak
or Talurjuaq ( Inuktitut
Inuktitut
syllabics: ᑕᓗᕐᔪᐊᖅ [taloʁjuˈaq]), formerly known as Spence Bay until 1 July 1992; (2016 population 1,029[3]) is located on the Boothia Peninsula, Kitikmeot, in Canada's Nunavut
Nunavut
Territory. The community is served only by air and by annual supply sealift. Taloyoak
Taloyoak
may mean "large blind", referring to a stone caribou blind or a screen used for caribou hunting. The community is situated 460 km (290 mi) east of the regional centre of Cambridge Bay, 1,224 km (761 mi) northeast of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
[...More...]

"Taloyoak" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Canada 2016 Census
The Canada
Canada
2016 Census is the most recent detailed enumeration of the Canadian residents, which counted a population of 35,151,728, a 7000500000000000000♠5% change from its 2011 population of 33,476,688. The census, conducted by Statistics Canada, was Canada's seventh quinquennial census.[N 1] The official census day was May 10, 2016
[...More...]

"Canada 2016 Census" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
Universal Time
(abbreviated to UTC) is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about 1 second of mean solar time at 0° longitude;[1] it does not observe daylight saving time
[...More...]

"Coordinated Universal Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Canada Flight Supplement
The Canada Flight Supplement
Canada Flight Supplement
(CFS) (French: Supplément de vol Canada) is a joint civil/military publication and is a supplement of the Aeronautical Information Publication (AIP Canada). It is the nation's official airport directory
[...More...]

"Canada Flight Supplement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Environment Canada
Environment and Climate
Climate
Change Canada
Canada
(or simply its former name, Environment Canada, or EC) (French: Environnement et Changement climatique Canada), legally incorporated as the Department of the Environment under the Department of the Environment Act (R.S., 1985, c. E-10 ), is the department of the Government of Canada
Government of Canada
with responsibility for coordinating environmental policies and programs as well as preserving and enhancing the natural environment and renewable resources
[...More...]

"Environment Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Relative Humidity
Relative humidity
Relative humidity
(RH) is the ratio of the partial pressure of water vapor to the equilibrium vapor pressure of water at a given temperature. Relative humidity
Relative humidity
depends on temperature and the pressure of the system of interest
[...More...]

"Relative Humidity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Precipitation
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
[...More...]

"Precipitation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Wind Chill
Wind-chill or windchill, (popularly wind chill factor) is the lowering of body temperature due to the passing-flow of lower-temperature air. Wind
Wind
chill numbers are always lower than the air temperature for values where the formula is valid. When the apparent temperature is higher than the air temperature, the heat index is used instead.Contents1 Explanation 2 Alternative approaches2.1 Original model 2.2 North American and United Kingdom wind chill index 2.3 Australian Apparent Temperature3 References 4 External linksExplanation[edit] A surface loses heat through conduction, convection, and radiation.[1] The rate of convection depends on both the difference in temperature between the surface and the fluid surrounding it and the velocity of that fluid with respect to the surface. As convection from a warm surface heats the air around it, an insulating boundary layer of warm air forms against the surface
[...More...]

"Wind Chill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Humidex
The humidex (short for humidity index) is an index number used by Canadian meteorologists to describe how hot the weather feels to the average person, by combining the effect of heat and humidity. The term humidex is a Canadian innovation coined in 1965.[1] The humidex is a dimensionless quantity based on the dew point. Range of humidex: Scale of comfort:[2][3]20 to 29: Little to no discomfort 30 to 39: Some discomfort 40 to 45: Great discomfort; avoid exertion Above 45: Dangerous; heat stroke quite possibleContents1 History 2 The humidex computation formula2.1 Table3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The current formula for determining the humidex was developed by J. M. Masterton and F. A. Richardson of Canada's Atmospheric Environment Service in 1979
[...More...]

"Humidex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ayers Rock
Uluru
Uluru
(/ˌuːləˈruː/, Pitjantjatjara: Uluṟu), also known as Ayers Rock (/ˌɛərz ˈrɒk/) and officially gazetted as "Uluru / Ayers Rock",[1] is a large sandstone rock formation in the southern part of the Northern Territory
Northern Territory
in central Australia. It lies 335 km (208 mi) south west of the nearest large town, Alice Springs, 450 km (280 mi) by road. Uluru
Uluru
is sacred to the Pitjantjatjara
Pitjantjatjara
Anangu, the Aboriginal people of the area. The area around the formation is home to an abundance of springs, waterholes, rock caves and ancient paintings. Uluru
Uluru
is listed as a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site
[...More...]

"Ayers Rock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Inuktitut
Inuktitut
Inuktitut
(English: /ɪˈnʊktɪtʊt/; Inuktitut: [inuktiˈtut], syllabics ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑐᑦ; from inuk, "person" + -titut, "like", "in the manner of"), also Eastern Canadian Inuktitut, is one of the principal Inuit languages
Inuit languages
of Canada. It is spoken in all areas north of the tree line, including parts of the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Quebec, to some extent in northeastern Manitoba
Manitoba
as well as the Northwest Territories
Northwest Territories
and Nunavut
[...More...]

"Inuktitut" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Northwest Territories
The Northwest Territories
Northwest Territories
(NT or NWT; French: les Territoires du Nord-Ouest, TNO; Athabaskan languages: Denendeh; Inuinnaqtun: Nunatsiaq; Inuktitut: ᓄᓇᑦᓯᐊᖅ) is a federal territory of Canada
[...More...]

"Northwest Territories" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Yellowknife
Yellowknife
Yellowknife
(English: /ˈjɛloʊnaɪf/) is the capital and only city, as well as the largest community, in the Northwest Territories
Northwest Territories
(NT or NWT), Canada. It is located on the northern shore of Great Slave Lake, approximately 400 km (250 mi) south of the Arctic
Arctic
Circle, on the west side of Yellowknife
Yellowknife
Bay near the outlet of the Yellowknife River. Yellowknife
Yellowknife
and its surrounding water bodies were named after a local Dene tribe once known as the ' Copper
Copper
Indians' or 'Yellowknife Indians', referred to locally as the Yellowknives
Yellowknives
Dene First Nation, who traded tools made from copper deposits near the Arctic
Arctic
Coast
[...More...]

"Yellowknife" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.