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Tahiti
Tahiti
Tahiti
(/təˈhiːti/; French pronunciation: ​[ta.iti]; previously also known as Otaheite (obsolete) is the largest island in the Windward group of French Polynesia. The island is located in the archipelago of the Society Islands
Society Islands
in the central Southern Pacific Ocean, and is divided into two parts: the bigger, northwestern part, Tahiti
Tahiti
Nui, and the smaller, southeastern part, Tahiti
Tahiti
Iti. The island was formed from volcanic activity and is high and mountainous with surrounding coral reefs
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Dike (geology)
A dike or dyke, in geological usage, is a sheet of rock that is formed in a fracture in a pre-existing rock body. Dikes can be either magmatic or sedimentary in origin. Magmatic dikes form when magma intrudes into a crack then crystallizes as a sheet intrusion, either cutting across layers of rock or through a contiguous mass of rock. Clastic dikes are formed when sediment fills a pre-existing crack.[1]Vertical basalt dikes cutting horizontal lava flows, Lord Howe Island, AustraliaA small dike on the Baranof Cross-Island Trail, AlaskaMagmatic dikes radiating from West Spanish Peak, Colorado, U.S.Contents1 Magmatic dikes 2 Sedimentary dikes 3 See also 4 ReferencesMagmatic dikes[edit] An intrusive dike is an igneous body with a very high aspect ratio, which means that its thickness is usually much smaller than the other two dimensions. Thickness can vary from sub-centimeter scale to many meters, and the lateral dimensions can extend over many kilometres
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White People
White people
White people
is a racial classification specifier, used for people of Caucasian ancestry, with the exact implications dependent on context. The usage of "white people" or a "white race" for a large group of (mainly European) populations, defined besides other characteristics by their light skin and contrasting with "black people", Native Americans, "colored" or "persons of color" originated in the 17th century. It was only during the 18th century, that this floating category was transformed in a quasi-scientific system of race and skin color relations. The concept of a homogeneous white race did not achieve universal acceptance in Europe. The strongest proponents of ethnocentrism in particular, such as Fascist Italy
Italy
and Nazi Germany, regarded some European peoples
European peoples
as racially distinct from themselves
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Basalt
Basalt
Basalt
(pronounced /bəˈsɔːlt/, /ˈbæsɒlt/ or /ˈbæsɔːlt/)[1] is a common extrusive igneous (volcanic) rock formed from the rapid cooling of basaltic lava exposed at or very near the surface of a planet or moon
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Shield Volcano
A shield volcano is a type of volcano usually built almost entirely of fluid lava flows. They are named for their low profile, resembling a warrior's shield lying on the ground. This is caused by the highly fluid (low viscosity) lava they erupt which travels farther than lava erupted from stratovolcanoes. This results in the steady accumulation of broad sheets of lava, building up the shield volcano's distinctive form
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Myr
The abbreviation myr, "million years", is a unit of a quantity of 7006100000000000000♠1,000,000 (i.e. 7006100000000000000♠1×106) years, or 31.6 teraseconds.Contents1 Usage 2 Debate 3 See also 4 ReferencesUsage[edit] Myr
Myr
is in common use where the term is often written, such as in Earth science and cosmology. Myr
Myr
is seen with mya, "million years ago". Together they make a reference system, one to a quantity, the other to a particular place in a year numbering system that is time before the present. Myr
Myr
is deprecated in geology, but in astronomy myr is standard
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Society Hotspot
The Society hotspot
Society hotspot
is a volcanic hotspot located in the Pacific Ocean, and is responsible for the creation of the Society Islands. See also[edit]Arago hotspot Tarava seamountsReferences[edit]This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Coordinates: 17°32′S 149°50′W / 17.533°S 149.833°W / -17.533; -149.833This volcanology article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a specific oceanic location or ocean current is a stub
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Pacific Plate
The Pacific Plate
Pacific Plate
is an oceanic tectonic plate that lies beneath the Pacific Ocean. At 103 million square kilometres (40,000,000 sq mi), it is the largest tectonic plate.[2] The Pacific Plate
Pacific Plate
contains an interior hot spot forming the Hawaiian Islands.[3] Hillis and Müller are reported to consider the Bird's Head Plate
Bird's Head Plate
to be moving in unison with the Pacific Plate.[4] Bird considers them to be unconnected.[5]Contents1 Boundaries 2 Paleo-geology of the Pacific Plate 3 References 4 External linksBoundaries[edit] The north-eastern side is a divergent boundary with the Explorer Plate, the Juan de Fuca Plate
Juan de Fuca Plate
and the Gorda Plate
Gorda Plate
forming respectively the Explorer Ridge, the Juan de Fuca Ridge
Juan de Fuca Ridge
and the Gorda Ridge
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Rainforest
Rainforests are forests characterized by high rainfall, with annual rainfall in the case of tropical rainforests between 250 and 450 centimetres (98 and 177 in),[1] and definitions varying by region for temperate rainforests
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Isthmus
An isthmus ( /ˈɪsθməs/ or /ˈɪsməs/;[1] plural: isthmuses; from Ancient Greek: ἰσθμός, translit. isthmos, lit. 'neck'[2]) is a narrow piece of land connecting two larger areas across an expanse of water by which they are otherwise separated.[3] A tombolo is an isthmus that consists of a spit or bar, and a strait is the sea counterpart of an isthmus. Canals are often built across isthmuses, where they may be a particularly advantageous shortcut for marine transport
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Trachyte
Trachyte
Trachyte
is an igneous volcanic rock with an aphanitic to porphyritic texture. It is the volcanic equivalent of syenite. The mineral assemblage consists of essential alkali feldspar; relatively minor plagioclase and quartz or a feldspathoid such as nepheline may also be present. (See the QAPF diagram). Biotite, clinopyroxene and olivine are common accessory minerals.Contents1 Chemical composition 2 Mineralogy 3 Geographic distribution 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksChemical composition[edit] Chemically, trachyte contains 60 to 65% silica content; less SiO2 than rhyolite and more (Na2O plus K2O) than dacite. These chemical differences are consistent with the position of trachyte in the TAS classification, and they account for the feldspar-rich mineralogy of the rock type. Mineralogy[edit]A polished opal on trachyteTrachytes usually consist mainly of sanidine feldspar
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French Colonial Empire
The French colonial empire
French colonial empire
constituted the overseas colonies, protectorates and mandate territories that came under French rule from the 16th century onward. A distinction is generally made between the "first colonial empire", that existed until 1814, by which time most of it had been lost, and the "second colonial empire", which began with the conquest of Algiers
Algiers
in 1830. The second empire came to an end after the loss in the bitter wars of Vietnam
Vietnam
(1954) and Algeria (1962), and relatively peaceful decolonizations elsewhere after 1960. Competing with Spain, Portugal, the Dutch United Provinces and later England, France
France
began to establish colonies in North America, the Caribbean
Caribbean
and India in the 17th century
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Annexation
Annexation
Annexation
( Latin
Latin
ad, to, and nexus, joining) is the administrative action[1] and concept in international law relating to the forcible transition of one state's territory by a
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Phonolite
Phonolite
Phonolite
is an uncommon volcanic rock, of intermediate chemical composition between felsic and mafic, with texture ranging from aphanitic (fine-grain) to porphyritic (mixed fine- and coarse-grain). The name phonolite comes from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
meaning "sounding stone" because of the metallic sound it produces if an unfractured plate is hit; hence the English name clinkstone.Contents1 Formation 2 Mineralogy and petrology 3 Occurrence3.1 Examples4 Economic importance 5 References 6 External linksFormation[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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French Citizen
French nationality law is historically based on the principles of jus soli (Latin for "right of soil"), according to Ernest Renan's definition, in opposition to the German definition of nationality, jus sanguinis (Latin for "right of blood"), formalized by Johann Gottlieb Fichte. The 1993 Méhaignerie Law required children born in France of foreign parents to request French nationality at adulthood, rather than being automatically accorded citizenship. This "manifestation of will" requirement was subsequently abrogated by the Guigou Law of 1998,[1] but children born in France of foreign parents remain foreign until obtaining legal majority. Children born in France to tourists or other short-term visitors do not acquire French citizenship by virtue of birth in France: residency must be proven
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Dome (geology)
A dome is a feature in structural geology consisting of symmetrical anticlines that intersect each other at their respective apices. Intact, domes are distinct, rounded, spherical-to-ellipsoidal-shaped protrusions on the Earth's surface. However, a transect parallel to Earth's surface of a dome features concentric rings of strata. Consequently, if the top of a dome has been eroded flat, the resulting structure in plan view appears as a bullseye, with the youngest rock layers at the outside, and each ring growing progressively older moving inwards
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