HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Syrup
In cooking, a syrup or sirup (from Arabic: شراب‎; sharāb, beverage, wine and Latin: sirupus)[1] is a condiment that is a thick, viscous liquid consisting primarily of a solution of sugar in water, containing a large amount of dissolved sugars but showing little tendency to deposit crystals. Its consistency is similar to that of molasses. The viscosity arises from the multiple hydrogen bonds between the dissolved sugar, which has many hydroxyl (OH) groups, and the water. Syrups can be made by dissolving sugar in water or by reducing naturally sweet juices such as cane juice, sorghum juice, or maple sap
[...More...]

"Syrup" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sirup (film)
Sirup is a 1990 Danish drama film written and directed by Helle Ryslinge.[1] It was entered into the main competition at the 47th Venice International Film Festival.[2] Cast[edit]Peter Hesse Overgaard as Lasse Kirsten Lehfeldt as Ditte Steen Svare as Jesper Henrik Scheele as Terje Pernille Højmark as Pia Aage Haugland as Goldbauer Søren Østergaard
Søren Østergaard
as Hr. FinthReferences[edit]^ Variety Film Reviews, Volume 21. R R Bowker Pub., 1990. ^ Giorgio Cecchetti (31 July 1990). "A Venezia spira il vento dell'ovest". La Repubblica. p. 25. External links[edit]Sirup on IMDbThis 1990s drama film–related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Sirup (film)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hydroxyl
A hydroxy or hydroxyl group is the entity with the formula OH. It contains oxygen bonded to hydrogen. In organic chemistry, alcohol and carboxylic acids contain hydroxy groups. The anion [OH−], called hydroxide, consists of a hydroxy group. According to IUPAC rules, the term hydroxyl refers to the radical OH only, while the functional group −OH is called hydroxy group.[1]Contents1 Properties 2 Occurrence 3 Hydroxyl radical 4 Lunar and other extraterrestrial observations 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksProperties[edit] Water, alcohols, carboxylic acids, and many other hydroxy-containing compounds can be deprotonated readily. This behavior is rationalized by the disparate electronegativities of oxygen and hydrogen. Hydroxy-containing compounds engage in hydrogen bonding, which causes them to stick together, leading to higher boiling and melting points than found for compounds that lack this functional group
[...More...]

"Hydroxyl" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Meringue
Meringue
Meringue
(/məˈræŋ/,[1] mə-RANG; French pronunciation: ​[məʁɛ̃ɡ]) is a type of dessert, often associated with French, Swiss, and Italian cuisine, traditionally made from whipped egg whites and sugar, and occasionally an acidic ingredient such as lemon, vinegar or cream of tartar. A binding agent such as salt, cornstarch or gelatin may also be added to the eggs. The key to the formation of a good meringue is the formation of stiff peaks by denaturing the protein ovalbumin (a protein in the egg whites) via mechanical shear. Meringues are often flavoured with vanilla, a small amount of almond, or coconut, although if extracts of these are used and are based on an oil infusion, an excess of fat from the oil may inhibit the egg whites from forming a foam. They are light, airy and sweet confections. Homemade meringues are often chewy and soft with a crisp exterior, while many commercial meringues are crisp throughout
[...More...]

"Meringue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Kithul Treacle
Caryota
Caryota
urens is a species of flowering plant in the palm family from the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia where they grow in fields and rainforest clearings. The epithet urens is Latin
Latin
for "stinging" alluding to the chemicals in the fruit. They are commonly called solitary fishtail palm, toddy palm, wine palm, jaggery palm. කිතුල් - Kithul in Sinhala, கூந்தற்பனை - Koonthal Panai in Tamil, ಬೈನೆ ಮರ in Kannada, ചൂണ്ടപ്പന - Choondappana in Malayalam
Malayalam
চাউর in Bengali,. Its leaf is used as fishing rod after trimming the branches of the leaf and drying. According to Monier-Williams, it is called moha-karin ("delusion maker") in Sanskrit
[...More...]

"Kithul Treacle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
[...More...]

"French Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Coffee Bar
A coffeehouse, coffee shop or café (sometimes spelt cafe) is an establishment which primarily serves hot coffee, related coffee beverages (café latte, cappuccino, espresso), tea, and other hot beverages. Some coffeehouses also serve cold beverages such as iced coffee and iced tea. Many cafés also serve some type of food, such as light snacks, muffins or pastries. Coffeehouses range from owner-operated. small businesses to large multinational corporations. In continental Europe, cafés often serve alcoholic beverages and light food, but elsewhere the term "café" may also refer to a tea room, "greasy spoon" (a small and inexpensive restaurant, colloquially called a "caff"), transport café, or other casual eating and drinking place.[1][2][3][4][5] A coffeehouse may share some of the same characteristics of a bar or restaurant, but it is different from a cafeteria
[...More...]

"Coffee Bar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cinnamon
Cinnamon
Cinnamon
(/ˈsɪnəmən/ SIN-ə-mən) is a spice obtained from the inner bark of several tree species from the genus Cinnamomum. Cinnamon is used mainly as an aromatic condiment and flavoring additive in a wide variety of cuisines, sweet and savoury dishes, breakfast cereals, snackfoods, and traditional foods. The aroma and flavor of cinnamon derive from its essential oil and principal component, cinnamaldehyde, as well as numerous other constituents, including eugenol. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
sticks, powder, and dried flowers of the Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum plant Cinnamomum
Cinnamomum
verum, from Koehler's Medicinal-Plants (1887)Close-up view of raw cinnamonThe term "cinnamon" also is used to describe its mid-brown colour. Cinnamon
Cinnamon
is the name for several species of trees and the commercial spice products that some of them produce
[...More...]

"Cinnamon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Orange (fruit)
The orange is the fruit of the citrus species Citrus
Citrus
× sinensis in the family Rutaceae.[1] It is also called sweet orange, to distinguish it from the related Citrus
Citrus
× aurantium, referred to as bitter orange. The sweet orange reproduces asexually (apomixis through nucellar embryony); varieties of sweet orange arise through mutations.[2] The orange is a hybrid between pomelo ( Citrus
Citrus
maxima) and mandarin ( Citrus
Citrus
reticulata).[2][3] The chloroplast genome, and therefore the maternal line, is that of pomelo.[4] The sweet orange has had its full genome sequenced.[2] Sweet
Sweet
oranges were mentioned in Chinese literature in 314 BC.[2] As of 1987[update], orange trees were found to be the most cultivated fruit tree in the world.[5] Orange trees are widely grown in tropical and subtropical climates for their sweet fruit
[...More...]

"Orange (fruit)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Water
Water
Water
is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms. Its chemical formula is H2O, meaning that each of its molecules contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms that are connected by covalent bonds. Strictly speaking, water refers to the liquid state of a substance that prevails at standard ambient temperature and pressure; but it often refers also to its solid state (ice) or its gaseous state (steam or water vapor). It also occurs in nature as snow, glaciers, ice packs and icebergs, clouds, fog, dew, aquifers, and atmospheric humidity. Water
Water
covers 71% of the Earth's surface.[1] It is vital for all known forms of life
[...More...]

"Water" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pectin
Pectin
Pectin
(from Ancient Greek: πηκτικός pēktikós, "congealed, curdled"[1]) is a structural heteropolysaccharide contained in the primary cell walls of terrestrial plants. It was first isolated and described in 1825 by Henri Braconnot.[2][3] It is produced commercially as a white to light brown powder, mainly extracted from citrus fruits, and is used in food as a gelling agent, particularly in jams and jellies
[...More...]

"Pectin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hydrogen Bond
A hydrogen bond is a partially electrostatic attraction between a hydrogen (H) which is bound to a more electronegative atom such as nitrogen (N), oxygen (O), or fluorine (F), and another adjacent atom bearing a lone pair of electrons. Hydrogen
Hydrogen
bonds can occur between molecules (intermolecular) or within different parts of a single molecule (intramolecular).[1] Depending on the nature of the donor and acceptor atoms which constitute the bond, their geometry, and environment, the energy of a hydrogen bond can vary between 1 and 40 kcal/mol.[2] This makes them somewhat stronger than a van der Waals interaction, and weaker than fully covalent or ionic bonds
[...More...]

"Hydrogen Bond" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.