HOME
The Info List - Syrup


--- Advertisement ---



In cooking, a syrup or sirup (from Arabic: شراب‎; sharāb, beverage, wine and Latin: sirupus)[1] is a condiment that is a thick, viscous liquid consisting primarily of a solution of sugar in water, containing a large amount of dissolved sugars but showing little tendency to deposit crystals. Its consistency is similar to that of molasses. The viscosity arises from the multiple hydrogen bonds between the dissolved sugar, which has many hydroxyl (OH) groups, and the water. Syrups can be made by dissolving sugar in water or by reducing naturally sweet juices such as cane juice, sorghum juice, or maple sap. Corn syrup
Corn syrup
is made from corn starch using an enzymatic process that converts it to sugars.

Contents

1 Culinary syrup 2 Syrups for beverages

2.1 Simple syrup 2.2 Flavoured syrup 2.3 Gomme syrup

3 See also 4 References 5 External links

Culinary syrup[edit] There are a range of syrups used in food production, including:

Glucose syrup Corn syrup Maple syrup High fructose corn syrup, widely used in the US[2][3][4][5] Golden syrup, a by-product of refining crystallized sugar

Syrups for beverages[edit]

A jug of bottler's flavor for 7-Up. The syrup-like concentrate lacks sugar and is sold to franchisees to refill.

A variety of beverages call for sweetening to offset the tartness of some juices used in the drink recipes. Granulated sugar does not dissolve easily in cold drinks or ethyl alcohol. Since the following syrups are liquids, they are easily mixed with other liquids in mixed drinks, making them superior alternatives to granulated sugar. Simple syrup[edit] A basic sugar-and-water syrup used by bartenders as a sweetener to make cocktails. Simple syrup is made by stirring granulated sugar into hot water in a saucepan until the sugar is dissolved and then cooling the solution. Generally, the ratio of sugar to water can range anywhere from 1:1 to 2:1 by weight, and similarly by volume due to air in the granulated sugar. For pure sucrose the saturation limit is about 5:4 by volume. Syrup
Syrup
can be used as a sweetener. However, since the syrup jells readily when pectin is added, its primary culinary use is as a base for fruit sauces, toppings, and preserves. Combining Demerara sugar, a type of natural brown sugar, with water produces Demerara syrup. Sugar
Sugar
substitutes such as honey or agave nectar can also be used to make simple syrups. Flavoured syrup[edit] Flavoured syrups are made by infusing simple syrups with flavouring agents during the cooking process. A wide variety of flavouring agents can be used, often in combination with each other, such as herbs (rosemary), spices (chipotle chilis; cardamom), or aromatics (orange peel; lemongrass; ginger). For instance, syrupus aromaticus is prepared by adding certain quantities of orange flavouring and cinnamon water to simple syrup. This type of syrup is commonly used at coffee bars, especially in the United States, to make flavoured drinks. Infused simple syrups can be used to create desserts, or, to add sweetness and depth of flavour to cocktails. Gomme syrup[edit] Gomme syrup (or gum syrup; gomme is French for "gum") is an ingredient commonly used in mixed drinks. It is also commonly used as a sweetener for iced coffee in Japan. Like bar syrups, it is a 2:1 sugar and water mixture, but has an added ingredient of gum arabic. Gomme syrup is made with the highest ratio of sugar to water possible, while the gum arabic prevents the sugar from crystallizing and adds a smooth texture. See also[edit]

Barley malt syrup Birch syrup Brown rice syrup Chocolate syrup Falernum Fruit syrup Grape syrup Grenadine Honey Inverted sugar syrup Kithul treacle Maple syrup Meringue Orgeat syrup Palm syrup Sharbat Sorghum syrup Squash (drink) Stevia Sugar
Sugar
beet syrup Syrup
Syrup
of Maidenhair Torani Treacle Yacón syrup

References[edit]

^ Online Etymology Dictionary: syrup Archived 2012-08-21 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Tyler James Wiltgen (August 2007). "An Economic History of the United States
United States
Sugar
Sugar
Program" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2015-02-09.  Masters thesis. ^ "U.S. Sugar
Sugar
Policy". SugarCane.org. Archived from the original on 2015-02-11. Retrieved 2015-02-11.  ^ "Food without Thought: How U.S. Farm Policy Contributes to Obesity". Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. November 2006. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27.  ^ "Corn Production/Value". Allcountries.org. Archived from the original on 2010-10-25. Retrieved 2010-11-06. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Syrups at Wikimedia Commons The dictionary definition of syrup at Wiktionary  "Syrup". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). 1911. 

v t e

Condiments

List of condiments List of common dips

Condiments

Ajika Ajvar Amba Anchovy paste Balsamic vinegar

Balsamic Vinegar
Vinegar
of Modena

Barbecue sauce Biber salçası Black vinegar Blue cheese dressing Brown sauce Beurre Maître d'Hôtel Buffalo sauce Chili peppers Cheese Cheong

Jocheong Maesil-cheong Mogwa-cheong Yuja-cheong

Chipotle Chili oil Chimichurri Chrain Chutney

Green mango chutney

Cocktail
Cocktail
sauce Colo-colo Crema Crushed red pepper Dabu-dabu Dip Duck sauce Duqqa Fish paste Fish sauce Fritessaus Fruit preserves Fry sauce Gochujang Gomashio Gravy Guacamole Hogao Honey
Honey
dill Honey
Honey
mustard Horseradish Hot sauce Kachumbari Kachumber Kaymak Khrenovina Kyopolou Lethocerus indicus Ljutenica Maafe Mayonnaise Mignonette sauce Milkette Monkey gland sauce Muhammara Mumbo sauce Murri Nam chim Nam phrik Nước chấm Nutritional yeast Olive
Olive
oil Oyster sauce Pearà Pepper jelly Perilla oil Pesto Piccalilli Pico de gallo Pickle Pickled fruit Pindjur Pistou Ponzu Popcorn seasoning Ranch dressing Relish Remoulade Marie Rose sauce Salad cream Salad dressing Salad dressing spread Salmoriglio Salsa Salsa golf Salt
Salt
and pepper Satsivi Sauerkraut Sesame oil Skyronnes Soy sauce

Soup soy sauce Sweet soy sauce

Steak sauce Sumbala Sweet chili sauce Syrup Tartar sauce Tekka Teriyaki
Teriyaki
sauce Tiparos Tkemali Tomato jam Toum Vinegar Vincotto Wasabi Watermelon rind preserves Worcestershire sauce

Tonkatsu

XO sauce Za'atar Zacuscă Zhug Zingara sauce

Ketchups

Banana ketchup Curry ketchup Fruit ketchup Mushroom ketchup

Mustards

Amora Colman's Dijon mustard Düsseldorfer Löwensenf French's Grey Poupon Gulden's Keen's Maille Mostarda National Mustard Museum Plochman's Stadium Mustard Tewkesbury mustard Thomy Turun sinappi Zatarain's

List articles

Accompaniments to french fries Brand name condiments Chutneys Fish pastes Fish sauces Indian condiments Japanese condiments Mustard brands Hot sauces Pakistani condiments Philippine condiments Pickled foods

Misc.

Carolina style Condiment Cruet-stand Mustard oil Sachet Salt and pepper
Salt and pepper
shakers

Category

v t e

Bartending

Occupations

Barback Bartender Beer
Beer
sommelier Cocktail
Cocktail
waitress Sommelier Bouncer

Alcoholic beverages

Beer Hard liquor Wine

Non-alcoholic mixers

Fruit juice Grenadine Soda pop Sugar
Sugar
syrup Tomato juice

Equipment

Bar
Bar
spoon Beer
Beer
engine Beer
Beer
tower Beverage coaster Blender Chinois Cocktail
Cocktail
shaker Cocktail
Cocktail
strainer Corkscrew Drinkware Glass rimmer Ice cube Jigger Juicer Margarita machine Melon baller Muddler Muddling spoon Nutmeg grater Peg Swizzle stick Whisk Zester

Garnishes

Edible

Bar
Bar
Sugar Celery Citrus
Citrus
wedge Cocktail
Cocktail
onion Maraschino cherry Olive Pickle Salt Twist

Inedible

Cocktail
Cocktail
stick Cocktail
Cocktail
umbrella Drinking straw Swizzle stick

People

List of bartenders

Terminology

Body shot Bottle keep Dryness Flair bartending Gay night Happy hour Ladies' night Last call Six o'clock swill Straight up Well drink

Related

Bartending school Cocktail Drinking establishment

index bar pub tavern

International Bartenders Association

official cocktails

Drink portal liquor portal  Category: Bartending

v t e

Routes of administration, dosage forms

Oral

Digestive tract (enteral)

Solids

Pill Tablet Capsule Pastille Time release technology Osmotic delivery system (OROS)

Liquids

Decoction Elixir Electuary Emulsion Extended-release syrup Effervescent
Effervescent
powder or tablet Herbal tea Hydrogel Molecular encapsulation Powder Softgel Solution Suspension Syrup Syrup
Syrup
Concentrate for dilution and/or addition of carbonated water Tincture

Buccal (sublabial), sublingual

Solids

Orally disintegrating tablet
Orally disintegrating tablet
(ODT) Film Lollipop Sublingual drops Lozenges Effervescent
Effervescent
buccal tablet Chewing gum

Liquids

Mouthwash Toothpaste Ointment Oral spray

Respiratory tract

Solids

Smoking
Smoking
device Dry-powder inhaler
Dry-powder inhaler
(DPI)

0 0

Liquids

Anaesthetic vaporizer Vaporizer Nebulizer Metered-dose inhaler
Metered-dose inhaler
(MDI)

Gas

Oxygen mask
Oxygen mask
and Nasal cannula Oxygen concentrator Anaesthetic machine Relative analgesia machine

Ophthalmic, otologic, nasal

Nasal spray Ear
Ear
drops Eye drops Ointment Hydrogel Nanosphere suspension Insufflation Mucoadhesive microdisc (microsphere tablet)

Urogenital

Ointment Pessary
Pessary
(vaginal suppository) Vaginal ring Vaginal douche Intrauterine device
Intrauterine device
(IUD) Extra-amniotic infusion Intravesical infusion

Rectal (enteral)

Ointment Suppository Enema

Solution Hydrogel

Murphy drip Nutrient enema

Dermal

Ointment Topical
Topical
cream Topical
Topical
gel Liniment Paste Film DMSO drug solution Electrophoretic
Electrophoretic
dermal delivery system Hydrogel Liposomes Transfersome vesicles Cream Lotion Lip balm Medicated shampoo Dermal patch Transdermal patch Contact (rubbed into break in the skin) Transdermal spray Jet injector

Injection, infusion (into tissue/blood)

Skin

Intradermal Subcutaneous Transdermal implant

Organs

Intracavernous Intravitreal Intra-articular injection Transscleral

Central nervous system

Intracerebral Intrathecal Epidural

Circulatory, musculoskeletal

Intravenous Intracardiac Intramuscular Intraosseous Intraperitoneal Nanocell injection Patient-Controlled Analgesia
Patient-Controlled Analgesia
pump PIC line

Category WikiProject Pharmacy portal

.