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Storytelling
STORYTELLING is the social and cultural activity of sharing stories , often with improvisation , theatrics , or embellishment. Stories or narratives have been shared in every culture as a means of entertainment , education, cultural preservation and instilling moral values. Crucial elements of stories and storytelling include plot , characters and narrative point of view . The term 'storytelling' is used in a narrow sense to refer specifically to oral storytelling and also in a looser sense to refer to techniques used in other media to unfold or disclose the narrative of a story
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Rosy-fingered Dawn
In Greek mythology , EOS (/ˈiːɒs/ ; Ionic and Homeric Greek Ἠώς Ēōs, Attic Ἕως Éōs, "dawn", pronounced or ; Aeolic Αὔως Aúōs, Doric Ἀώς Āṓs) is a Titaness and the goddess of the dawn , who rose each morning from her home at the edge of the Oceanus . Eos had a brother and a sister, Helios , god of the sun, and Selene , goddess of the moon. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Greek literature * 3 Genealogy * 4 Lovers and children * 5 Etruscan interpretations * 6 Roman interpretations * 7 See also * 8 Notes * 9 References * 10 External links ETYMOLOGYEos is cognate to the Vedic goddess Ushas , Lithuanian goddess Austrine , and Roman goddess Aurora (Old Latin Ausosa), all three of whom are also goddesses of the dawn. All four are considered derivatives of the Proto-Indo-European stem *h₂ewsṓs (later *Ausṓs), "dawn", a stem that also gave rise to Proto-Germanic *Austrō, Old Germanic *Ōstara and Old English Ēostre /Ēastre
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Mythology
MYTHOLOGY refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people or to the study of such myths. A folklore genre , myth is a feature of every culture . Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena , to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals . A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging , shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons . The study of myth began in ancient history . Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus , Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
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Beowulf
BEOWULF (/ˈbeɪoʊwʊlf, ˈbiːoʊ-/ ; Old English: ) is an Old English epic poem consisting of 3,182 alliterative lines . It may be the oldest surviving long poem in Old English
Old English
and is commonly cited as one of the most important works of Old English
Old English
literature . A date of composition is a matter of contention among scholars; the only certain dating pertains to the manuscript, which was produced between 975 and 1025. The author was an anonymous Anglo-Saxon poet, referred to by scholars as the " Beowulf
Beowulf
poet". The poem is set in Scandinavia
Scandinavia
. Beowulf
Beowulf
, a hero of the Geats , comes to the aid of Hrothgar, the king of the Danes , whose mead hall in Heorot has been under attack by a monster known as Grendel
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The Boyhood Of Raleigh
THE BOYHOOD OF RALEIGH is a painting by John Everett Millais
John Everett Millais
, which was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1871. It came to epitomise the culture of heroic imperialism in late Victorian Britain and in British popular culture up to the mid-twentieth century. The painting depicts the young, wide-eyed Sir Walter Raleigh and his brother sitting on the beach by the Devonshire coast. He is listening to a story of life on the seas, told by an experienced sailor who points out to the sea. CONTENTS * 1 Origins * 2 Literary and satirical use * 2.1 Cartoons * 2.2 Postcolonialism * 2.3 Record Covers * 3 References ORIGINSThe painting was influenced by an essay written by James Anthony Froude on England's Forgotten Worthies, which described the lives of Elizabethan seafarers
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Canvas
CANVAS is an extremely durable plain-woven fabric used for making sails , tents , marquees , backpacks , and other items for which sturdiness is required. It is also popularly used by artists as a painting surface, typically stretched across a wooden frame. It is also used in such fashion objects as handbags, electronic device cases, and shoes. Modern canvas is usually made of cotton or linen , although historically it was made from hemp . It differs from other heavy cotton fabrics, such as denim , in being plain weave rather than twill weave . Canvas
Canvas
comes in two basic types: plain and duck . The threads in duck canvas are more tightly woven. The term duck comes from the Dutch word for cloth, doek. In the United States
United States
, canvas is classified in two ways: by weight (ounces per square yard) and by a graded number system. The numbers run in reverse of the weight so a number 10 canvas is lighter than number 4
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Palm-leaf Manuscript
PALM-LEAF MANUSCRIPTS are manuscripts made out of dried palm leaves. Palm leaves were used as writing materials in South Asia
South Asia
and in Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
dating back to the 5th century BCE, and possibly much earlier. Their use began in South Asia
South Asia
, and spread elsewhere, as texts on dried and smoke treated palm leaves of Borassus species (Palmyra palm) or the Ola leaf (leaf of Corypha umbraculifera or the talipot palm). One of the oldest surviving palm leaf manuscript is a Sanskrit Shaivism
Shaivism
text from the 9th-century, discovered in Nepal
Nepal
, now preserved at the Cambridge University Library
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Tapa Cloth
TAPA CLOTH (or simply tapa) is a barkcloth made in the islands of the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
, primarily in Tonga
Tonga
, Samoa
Samoa
and Fiji
Fiji
, but as far afield as Niue , Cook Islands
Cook Islands
, Futuna , Solomon Islands
Solomon Islands
, Java , New Zealand , Vanuatu
Vanuatu
, Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
(particularly in Oro Province around Tufi ) and Hawaii
Hawaii
(where it is called kapa ). In French Polynesia it has nearly disappeared, except for some villages in the Marquesas
Marquesas

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Paper
PAPER is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood , rags or grasses , and drying them into flexible sheets. It is a versatile material with many uses, including writing , printing , packaging, cleaning , and a number of industrial and construction processes. The pulp papermaking process is said to have been developed in China during the early 2nd century CE, possibly as early as the year 105 CE, by the Han court eunuch Cai Lun , although the earliest archaeological fragments of paper derive from the 2nd century BCE in China. The modern pulp and paper industry is global, with China leading its production and the United States right behind it
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Documentary
A DOCUMENTARY FILM is a nonfictional motion picture intended to document some aspect of reality , primarily for the purposes of instruction, education, or maintaining a historical record . Such films were originally shot on film stock —the only medium available—but now include video and digital productions that can be either direct-to-video , made into a TV show, or released for screening in cinemas. "Documentary" has been described as a "filmmaking practice, a cinematic tradition, and mode of audience reception" that is continually evolving and is without clear boundaries
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Web Documentary
A WEB DOCUMENTARY, INTERACTIVE DOCUMENTARY, or MULTIMEDIA DOCUMENTARY is a documentary production that differs from the more traditional forms—video , audio , photographic —by applying a full complement of multimedia tools. The interactive multimedia capability of the Internet provides documentarians with a unique medium to create non-linear productions that combine photography, text, audio, video, animation, and infographics based on real time content. This way the publications progresses over several weeks. Since it is an interactive work, the narrative advances through the actions taken by the users through public interface. The user is able to modify its journey through the documentary based on their responses. This way the participation by the users are the key element that give meaning to this new audiovisual genre
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Parc Des Buttes Chaumont
The PARC DES BUTTES-CHAUMONT (pronounced ) is a public park situated in northeastern Paris, in the 19th arrondissement . Occupying 24.7 hectares (61 acres), it is the fifth-largest park in Paris, after the Bois de Vincennes
Bois de Vincennes
, the Bois de Boulogne
Bois de Boulogne
, the Parc de la Villette
Parc de la Villette
, and the Tuileries Garden
Tuileries Garden
. It was opened in 1867, late in the regime of Emperor Napoleon III
Napoleon III
, and was built by Jean-Charles Alphand
Jean-Charles Alphand
, who created all the major parks of Napoleon III. The park has 5.5 kilometres (3.4 miles) of roads and 2.2 kilometres (1.4 miles) of paths. The most famous feature of the park is the Temple de la Sibylle, inspired by the Temple of Vesta in Tivoli , Italy, perched at the top of a cliff fifty metres above the waters of the artificial lake
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. PARIS (French pronunciation: ​ ( listen )) is the capital and most populous city in France
France
, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015). The city is a commune and department , and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de- France
France
region (colloquially known as the ' Paris
Paris
Region'), whose 2016 population of 12,142,802 represented roughly 18 percent of the population of France. Since the 17th century, Paris
Paris
has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts
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France
FRANCE (French: ), officially the FRENCH REPUBLIC (French: République française, pronounced ), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe
Europe
, as well as several overseas regions and territories . The metropolitan area of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea
North Sea
, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America
South America
and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Milman Parry
MILMAN PARRY (June 20, 1902 – December 3, 1935) was a scholar of epic poetry and the founder of the discipline of oral tradition . CONTENTS * 1 Early life and education * 2 Academic career * 3 Death and commemoration * 4 Influence * 5 Notes * 6 External links EARLY LIFE AND EDUCATIONHe was born in 1902, graduated from Oakland Technical High School in 1919, and studied at the University of California, Berkeley (B.A. and M.A.) and at the Sorbonne (Ph.D.). A student of the linguist Antoine Meillet at the Sorbonne, Parry revolutionized Homeric studies . In his dissertations, which were published in French in 1928, he demonstrated that the Homeric style is characterized by the extensive use of fixed expressions, or 'formulas', adapted for expressing a given idea under the same metrical conditions. Meillet introduced him to Matija Murko , who had worked on oral epic traditions in Bosnia and had made phonograph recordings of some performances
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Odyssey
The ODYSSEY (/ˈɒdəsi/ ; Greek : Ὀδύσσεια Odýsseia, pronounced in Classical Attic ) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer
Homer
. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad , the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey
The Odyssey
is fundamental to the modern Western canon ; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad
Iliad
is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey
Odyssey
was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia , the Greek coastal region of Anatolia
Anatolia
. The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus
Odysseus
(known as Ulysses in Roman myths), king of Ithaca
Ithaca
, and his journey home after the fall of Troy
Troy

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