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Storytelling
Storytelling
Storytelling
describes the social and cultural activity of sharing stories, sometimes with improvisation, theatrics, or embellishment. Every culture has its own stories or narratives, which are shared as a means of entertainment, education, cultural preservation or instilling moral values.[1] Crucial elements of stories and storytelling include plot, characters and narrative point of view. The term "storytelling" can refer in a narrow sense specifically to oral storytelling and also in a looser sense to techniques used in other media to unfold or disclose the narrative of a story.Contents1
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Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
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Drama Therapy
Drama
Drama
therapy (written dramatherapy in the UK, Europe, Australia, and Africa) is the use of theatre techniques to facilitate personal growth and promote mental health.[1] Drama
Drama
therapy is used in a wide variety of settings, including hospitals, schools, mental health centers, prisons, and businesses. Drama
Drama
therapy, as a form of 'expressive therapy' (also known as creative arts therapies'),[2] exists in many forms and can be applicable to individuals, couples, families, and various groups.[3]Contents1 History 2 Core processes 3 Becoming a drama therapist 4 In practice 5 See also 6 References 7 External links7.1 Governing bodies 7.2 Other drama therapy-related websitesHistory[edit] The modern use of dramatic process and theatre as a therapeutic intervention began with Dr. Jacob L. Moreno's development of Psychodrama
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Tapa Cloth
Tapa cloth
Tapa cloth
(or simply tapa) is a barkcloth made in the islands of the Pacific Ocean, primarily in Tonga, Samoa
Samoa
and Fiji, but as far afield as Niue, Cook Islands, Futuna, Solomon Islands, Java, New Zealand, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
and Hawaii
Hawaii
(where it is called kapa). In French Polynesia
French Polynesia
it has nearly disappeared, except for some villages in the Marquesas.Contents1 General 2 Fabrication 3 Painting 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksGeneral[edit]This tapa cloth was made in Papua New Guinea
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Paper
Paper
Paper
is a thin material produced by pressing together moist fibres of cellulose pulp derived from wood, rags or grasses, and drying them into flexible sheets
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The Boyhood Of Raleigh
A boy is a young male human, usually a child or adolescent. When he becomes an adult, he is described as a man.Contents1 Etymology1.1 Usage for adults2 Characteristics of boys 3 Specific uses and compounds3.1 Military 3.2 Domestic, residential and similar 'personal' attendants 3.3 Cultural and religious life 3.4 Rural life and professions 3.5 Commercial and other services 3.6 Race4 Non-function specific analogous terms 5 Analogous uses and popular etymology 6 Similar originally youth-related terms 7 Boys in art 8 Gallery 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksEtymology The word "boy" comes from Middle English
Middle English
boi, boye ("boy, servant"), related to other Germanic words for boy, namely East Frisian boi ("boy, young man") and West Frisian boai ("boy")
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Film
A film, also called a movie, motion picture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images. (See the glossary of motion picture terms.) This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed in rapid succession. The process of filmmaking is both an art and an industry
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Mythology
Mythology
Mythology
refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people[1] or to the study of such myths.[2] A folklore genre, myth is a feature of every culture. Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena, to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals. A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists
Neoplatonists
and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
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Web Documentary
A web documentary, interactive documentary, or multimedia documentary is a documentary production that differs from the more traditional forms—video, audio, photographic—by applying a full complement of multimedia tools. The interactive multimedia capability of the Internet provides documentarians with a unique medium to create non-linear productions that combine photography, text, audio, video, animation, and infographics based on real time content. This way the publications progresses over several weeks. Since it is an interactive work, the narrative advances through the actions taken by the users through public interface. The user is able to modify its journey through the documentary based on their responses. This way the participation by the users are the key element that give meaning to this new audiovisual genre
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Psychodrama
Psychodrama
Psychodrama
is an action method, often used as a psychotherapy, in which clients use spontaneous dramatization, role playing, and dramatic self-presentation to investigate and gain insight into their lives.[1] Developed by Jacob L. Moreno, psychodrama includes elements of theater, often conducted on a stage, or a space that serves as a stage area, where props can be used. A psychodrama therapy group, under the direction of a licensed psychodramatist, reenacts real-life, past situations (or inner mental processes), acting them out in present time. Participants then have the opportunity to evaluate their behavior, reflect on how the past incident is getting played out in the present and more deeply understand particular situations in their lives.[2] Psychodrama
Psychodrama
offers a creative way for an individual or group to explore and solve personal problems
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Parc Des Buttes Chaumont
The Parc des Buttes-Chaumont (pronounced [paʁk de byt ʃomɔ̃]) is a public park situated in northeastern Paris, in the 19th arrondissement. Occupying 24.7 hectares (61 acres), it is the fifth-largest park in Paris, after the Bois de Vincennes, the Bois de Boulogne, the Parc de la Villette, and the Tuileries Garden. It was opened in 1867, late in the regime of Emperor Napoleon III, and was built by Jean-Charles Alphand, who created all the major parks of Napoleon III.[1] The park has 5.5 kilometres (3.4 miles) of roads and 2.2 kilometres (1.4 miles) of paths
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Pottery
Pottery
Pottery
is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares,[1] of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery (plural "potteries"). The definition of pottery used by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is "all fired ceramic wares that contain clay when formed, except technical, structural, and refractory products."[2] Pottery
Pottery
is one of the oldest human inventions, originating before the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, with ceramic objects like the Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Venus of Dolní Věstonice
Venus of Dolní Věstonice
figurine discovered in the Czech Republic date back to 29,000–25,000 BC,[3] and pottery vessels that were discovered in Jiangxi, China, which date back to 18,000 BC
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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Milman Parry
Milman Parry
Milman Parry
(June 20, 1902 – December 3, 1935) was an American scholar of epic poetry and the founder of the discipline of oral tradition.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Academic career 3 Death and commemoration 4 Influence 5 Notes 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit]Parry in his 1919 high school yearbookHe was born in 1902, graduated from Oakland Technical High School
Oakland Technical High School
in 1919,[1] and studied at the University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
(B.A. and M.A.) and at the Sorbonne (Ph.D.)
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Odyssey
The Odyssey
The Odyssey
(/ˈɒdəsi/;[1] Greek: Ὀδύσσεια Odýsseia, pronounced [o.dýs.sej.ja] in Classical Attic) is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is, in part, a sequel to the Iliad, the other work ascribed to Homer. The Odyssey
The Odyssey
is fundamental to the modern Western canon; it is the second-oldest extant work of Western literature, while the Iliad
Iliad
is the oldest. Scholars believe the Odyssey
Odyssey
was composed near the end of the 8th century BC, somewhere in Ionia, the Greek coastal region of Anatolia.[2] The poem mainly focuses on the Greek hero Odysseus
Odysseus
(known as Ulysses in Roman myths), king of Ithaca, and his journey home after the fall of Troy
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