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Stanza
In poetry, a stanza (/ˈstænzə/; from Italian stanza [ˈstantsa], "room") is a grouped set of lines within a poem, usually set off from other stanzas by a blank line or indentation.[1] Stanzas can have regular rhyme and metrical schemes, though stanzas are not strictly required to have either. There are many unique forms of stanzas. Some stanzaic forms are simple, such as four-line quatrains. Other forms are more complex, such as the Spenserian stanza. Fixed verse poems, such as sestinas, can be defined by the number and form of their stanzas. The term stanza is similar to strophe, though strophe sometimes refers to irregular set of lines, as opposed to regular, rhymed stanzas.[2] The stanza in poetry is analogous with the paragraph that is seen in prose; related thoughts are grouped into units.[3] In music, groups of lines are typically referred to as verses
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Couplet
A couplet is a pair of successive lines of metre in poetry. A couplet usually consists of two successive lines that rhyme and have the same metre. A couplet may be formal (closed) or run-on (open). In a formal (or closed) couplet, each of the two lines is end-stopped, implying that there is a grammatical pause at the end of a line of verse. In a run-on (or open) couplet, the meaning of the first line continues to the second.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Couplets in English poetry 3 Couplets in Chinese poetry 4 Couplets in Tamil poetry 5 Distich 6 See also 7 ReferencesBackground[edit] The word "couplet" comes from the French word meaning "two pieces of iron riveted or hinged together." The term "couplet" was first used to describe successive lines of verse in Sir P. Sidney's Arcadia in 1590: "In singing some short coplets, whereto the one halfe beginning, the other halfe should answere." [2] While couplets traditionally rhyme, not all do
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Verse (popular Music)
Verse–chorus form is a musical form common in popular music, used in blues and rock and roll since the 1950s,[1] and predominant in rock music since the 1960s. In contrast to thirty-two-bar form, which is focused on the verse (contrasted and prepared by the B section), in verse–chorus form the chorus is highlighted (prepared and contrasted with the verse).[2] "Musically, most Civil War songs were cast in the verse–chorus patterns that had been popularized by Foster and widely imitated by his peers and successors, with their choruses set in four-part harmony."[3] Thus, while in both forms A is the verse and B is the chorus, in AABA the verse takes up most of the time and the chorus exists to contrast and lead back into the return of the verse, in verse–chorus form the chorus often takes much more time proportionally and the verse exists to lead into it
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Ghazal
The ghazal (Urdu: غزَل ‬‎, Hindi: ग़ज़ल, Persian: غزل‎, Pashto: غزل‎, Bengali: ঘজল), a type of amatory poem or ode,[1] originating in Arabic poetry.Contents1 History 2 Pronunciation 3 Themes3.1 Unconditional, superior love 3.2 Sufism4 Important poets of Persian Ghazal 5 Translations and performance of classical Ghazal 6 Popularity 7 In English7.1 Notable poets who composed Ghazals8 Ghazal
Ghazal
singers 9 See also 10 Footnotes 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] The ghazal originated in Arabia in the 7th century[2] and later spread throughout the Middle East and South Asia. It was famous all around the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
in the 18th and 19th centuries[unreliable source?]
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Literary Consonance
Consonance is a stylistic literary device identified by the repetition of identical or similar consonants in neighbouring words whose vowel sounds are different (e.g. coming home, hot foot).[1] Consonance may be regarded as the counterpart to the vowel-sound repetition known as assonance.[1] Alliteration
Alliteration
is a special case of consonance where the repeated consonant sound is at the stressed syllable,[2] as in "few flocked to the fight" or "around the rugged rock the ragged rascal ran". Alliteration
Alliteration
is usually distinguished from other types of consonance in poetic analysis, and has different uses and effects. Another special case of consonance is sibilance, the use of several sibilant sounds such as /s/ and /sh/
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Half Rhyme
Perfect rhyme—also called full rhyme, exact rhyme,[1] or true rhyme—is a form of rhyme between two words or phrases, satisfying the following conditions:[2][3]The stressed vowel sound in both words must be identical, as well as any subsequent sounds. For example, "sky" and "high"; "skylight" and "highlight". The articulation that precedes the vowel in the words must differ. For example, "bean" and "green" is a perfect rhyme, while "leave" and "believe" is not.Word pairs that satisfy the first condition but not the second (such as the aforementioned "leave" and "believe") are technically identities (also known as identical rhymes or identicals). Homophones, being words of different meaning but identical pronunciation, are an example of identical rhyme.[3]Contents1 Imperfect rhyme1.1 Use in hip hop/rap 1.2 Unconventional exceptions2 See also 3 ReferencesImperfect rhyme[edit] "Sprung rhyme" redirects here
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Holorime
Holorhyme is a rhyme of a word or sentence with another word.Contents1 In English 2 In French 3 Other examples 4 See also 5 External linksIn English[edit]"In Ayrshire hill areas, a cruise, eh, lass?" "Inertia, hilarious, accrues, hélas!"—Miles Kington, "A Lowlands Holiday Ends in Enjoyable Inactivity"."Poor old Dali loped with an amazin' raging cyst, as poor Roald Dahl
Roald Dahl
eloped with Anna-May's enraging sisters."—the final line from an unpublished short story by translator Steven F. Smith about the attempts of Salvador Dalí
Salvador Dalí
and Roald Dahl
Roald Dahl
to woo a pair of Americans.In French[edit] See also: Rime riche In French poetry, rime richissime ("very rich rhyme") is a rhyme of more than three phonemes. A holorime is an extreme example
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Syllable Rhyme
A syllable is a unit of organization for a sequence of speech sounds. For example, the word water is composed of two syllables: wa and ter. A syllable is typically made up of a syllable nucleus (most often a vowel) with optional initial and final margins (typically, consonants). Syllables are often considered the phonological "building blocks" of words. They can influence the rhythm of a language, its prosody, its poetic meter and its stress patterns. Syllabic writing
Syllabic writing
began several hundred years before the first letters. The earliest recorded syllables are on tablets written around 2800 BC in the Sumerian city of Ur. This shift from pictograms to syllables has been called "the most important advance in the history of writing".[1] A word that consists of a single syllable (like English dog) is called a monosyllable (and is said to be monosyllabic)
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Internal Rhyme
In poetry, internal rhyme, or middle rhyme, is rhyme that occurs within a single line of verse, or between internal phrases across multiple lines.[1][2] By contrast, rhyme between line endings is known as end rhyme. Examples[edit] Percy Dearmer
Percy Dearmer
(1867–1936) revised John Bunyan's (1628–1688) poem "To Be a Pilgrim" in 1906. It became a popular hymn when Canon Charles Winfred Douglas (1867–1944) set it to music in 1917. Here are Dearmer's lyrics, with the internal rhymes in bold
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Alliteration
Alliteration
Alliteration
is a figure of speech and a stylistic literary device which is identified by the repeated sound of the first or second letter in a series of words, or the repetition of the same letter sounds in stressed syllables of a phrase.[1][better source needed] "Alliteration" is from the Latin word littera, meaning "letter of the alphabet"; it was first coined in a Latin dialogue by the Italian humanist Giovanni Pontano
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Emily Dickinson
Emily Elizabeth Dickinson (December 10, 1830 – May 15, 1886) was an American poet. Dickinson was born in Amherst, Massachusetts. Although part of a prominent family with strong ties to its community, Dickinson lived much of her life in reclusive isolation. After studying at the Amherst Academy for seven years in her youth, she briefly attended the Mount Holyoke Female Seminary before returning to her family's house in Amherst. Considered an eccentric by locals, she developed a noted penchant for white clothing and became known for her reluctance to greet guests or, later in life, to even leave her bedroom. Dickinson never married, and most friendships between her and others depended entirely upon correspondence
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Prose
Prose
Prose
is a form of language that exhibits a natural flow of speech and grammatical structure rather than a rhythmic structure as in traditional poetry, where the common unit of verse is based on meter or rhyme.Contents1 Background 2 Etymology 3 Origins 4 Structure 5 Types 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksBackground[edit] There are critical debates on the construction of prose: "... the distinction between verse and prose is clear, the distinction between poetry and prose is obscure".[1] Prose
Prose
in its simplicity and loosely defined structure is broadly adaptable to spoken dialogue, factual discourse, and to topical and fictional writing
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Pararhyme
Pararhyme is a half-rhyme in which there is vowel variation within the same consonant pattern. "Strange Meeting" (1918) is a poem by Wilfred Owen, a war poet who used pararhyme in his writing. Here is a part of the poem that shows pararhyme:Too fast in thought or death to be bestirred. Then, as I probed them, one sprang up, and stared With piteous recognition in fixed eyes, Lifting distressful hands, as if to bless. And by his smile, I knew that sullen hall, By his dead smile I knew we stood in Hell.Pararhyme features in the Welsh cynghanedd poetic forms
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Italian Language
Italian ( italiano (help·info) [itaˈljaːno] or lingua italiana [ˈliŋɡwa itaˈljaːna]) is a Romance language. Italian is by most measures, together with the Sardinian language, the closest tongue to vulgar Latin
Latin
of the Romance languages.[7] Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City
Vatican City
and western Istria
Istria
(in Slovenia
Slovenia
and Croatia). It used to have official status in Albania, Malta
Malta
and Monaco, where it is still widely spoken, as well as in former Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
and Italian North Africa regions where it plays a significant role in various sectors
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