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GWR No. 1340 Trojan

Her first owners were Messrs Dunn & Shute of Newport Town Dock. In 1903 she was purchased by the Alexandra Docks Railway. This was absorbed into the Great Western Railway in 1923. In July 1932, the GWR sold her to the Netherseal colliery, Burton-on-Trent. She changed hands again in 1947, going to Alders (Tamworth) Ltd. Trojan is now preserved at the Didcot Railway Centre. It was restored to working order in 2002 and remained in service on demonstration trains at Didcot until 2011 when it was withdrawn for a ten-yearly overhaul. Trojan was moved offsite in 2016 for the overhaul to take place. In The Railway Series, Percy the Small Engine was originally a GWR 1361-look alike with an 0-4-0ST configuration, later he was illustrated more like a Trojan (with a coal bunker similar to the aforementioned engine) as originally intended by the Rev. W
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Steam Tram

Historically, the Paris Tram System was, at its peak, the world's largest system, with 1,111 km (690 mi) of track in 1925[citation needed] (according to other sources, ca. 640 km (400 mi) of route length in 1930). However it was completely closed in 1938.[127] The next largest system appears to have been 857 km (533 mi), in Buenos Aires before 19 February 1963. The third largest was Chicago, with over 850 km (530 mi) of track,[128] but it was all converted to trolleybus and bus services by 21 June 1958. Before its decline, the BVG in Berlin operated a very large network with 634 km (394 mi) of route
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Great Eastern Railway

The Great Eastern Railway (GER) was a pre-grouping British railway company, whose main line linked London Liverpool Street to Norwich and which had other lines through East Anglia. The company was grouped into the London and North Eastern Railway in 1923. Formed in 1862 after the amalgamation of the Eastern Counties Railway and several other smaller railway companies the GER served Cambridge, Chelmsford, Colchester, Great Yarmouth, Ipswich, King's Lynn, Lowestoft, Norwich, Southend-on-Sea (opened by the GER in 1889), and East Anglian seaside resorts such as Hunstanton (whose prosperity was largely a result of the GER's line being built) and Cromer.[1] It also served a suburban area, including Enfield, Chingford, Loughton and Ilford
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Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway

The Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway locomotive works were originally at Miles Platting, Manchester. From 1889 they were at Horwich. To see surviving L&YR steam locomotives, go to Locomotives of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Surviving coaching stock of L&YR origin go as far as 1878, with Directors Saloon No. 1 being privately preserved at the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway.[22] Multiple coaches are preserved by Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Trust,[23] at the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway, 6-wheel 5-comp third No. 1507,[24] Blackpool Club Car No. 47,[25] 6-wheel 4-comp First No. 279[26] and Brake third No
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Great Western Railway

The line to Basingstoke had originally been built by the Berks and Hants Railway as a broad-gauge route in an attempt to keep the standard gauge of the LSWR out of Great Western territory but, in 1857, the GWR and LSWR opened a shared line to Weymouth on the south coast, the GWR route being via Chippenham and a route initially started by the Wilts, Somerset and Weymouth Railway.[20] Further west, the LSWR took over the broad-gauge Exeter and Crediton Railway and North Devon Railway,[22] also the standard-gauge Bodmin and Wadebridge Railway
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