HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Simian
The simians (infraorder Simiiformes) are monkeys and apes, cladistically including: the New World monkeys or platyrrhines, and the catarrhine clade consisting of the Old World monkeys and apes (including humans). The simian and tarsier lines of haplorhines diverged about 60 million years ago (during the Cenozoic era). Forty million years ago, simians from Africa colonized South America, giving rise to the New World monkeys
[...More...]

"Simian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Parvorder
In biological classification, the order (Latin: ordo) isa taxonomic rank used in the classification of organisms and recognized by the nomenclature codes. Other well-known ranks are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, class, family, genus, and species, with order fitting in between class and family. An immediately higher rank, superorder, may be added directly above order, while suborder would be a lower rank. a taxonomic unit, a taxon, in that rank. In that case the plural is orders (Latin ordines).Example: All owls belong to the order Strigiformes.What does and does not belong to each order is determined by a taxonomist, as is whether a particular order should be recognized at all. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists each taking a different position. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing or recognizing an order
[...More...]

"Parvorder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Infraorder
In biological classification, the order (Latin: ordo) isa taxonomic rank used in the classification of organisms and recognized by the nomenclature codes. Other well-known ranks are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, class, family, genus, and species, with order fitting in between class and family. An immediately higher rank, superorder, may be added directly above order, while suborder would be a lower rank. a taxonomic unit, a taxon, in that rank. In that case the plural is orders (Latin ordines).Example: All owls belong to the order Strigiformes.What does and does not belong to each order is determined by a taxonomist, as is whether a particular order should be recognized at all. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists each taking a different position. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing or recognizing an order
[...More...]

"Infraorder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
[...More...]

"Animal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chordate
And see textA chordate is an animal belonging to the phylum Chordata; chordates possess a notochord, a hollow dorsal nerve cord, pharyngeal slits, an endostyle, and a post-anal tail, for at least some period of their life cycle. Chordates are deuterostomes, as during the embryo development stage the anus forms before the mouth. They are also bilaterally symmetric coelomates with metameric segmentation and a circulatory system. In the case of vertebrate chordates, the notochord is usually replaced by a vertebral column during development. Taxonomically, the phylum includes the following subphyla: the Vertebrata, which includes fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals; the Tunicata, which includes salps and sea squirts; and the Cephalochordata, which include the lancelets. There are also additional extinct taxa such as the Vetulicolia
[...More...]

"Chordate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mammal
Mammals are the vertebrates within the class Mammalia (/məˈmeɪliə/ from Latin mamma "breast"), a clade of endothermic amniotes distinguished from reptiles (including birds) by the possession of a neocortex (a region of the brain), hair, three middle ear bones, and mammary glands. Females of all mammal species nurse their young with milk, secreted from the mammary glands. Mammals include the largest animal on the planet, the blue whale. The basic body type is a terrestrial quadruped, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in trees, underground or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta, which enables the feeding of the fetus during gestation. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 30-meter (98 ft) blue whale. With the exception of the five species of monotreme (egg-laying mammals), all modern mammals give birth to live young
[...More...]

"Mammal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Principle Of Priority
Priority is a fundamental principle of modern botanical nomenclature and zoological nomenclature. Essentially, it is the principle of recognising the first valid application of a name to a plant or animal
[...More...]

"Principle Of Priority" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Colin Groves
Colin Peter Groves (24 June 1942 – 30 November 2017) was Professor of Biological Anthropology
Biological Anthropology
at the Australian National University
Australian National University
in Canberra, Australia.[1] Born in England, Groves completed a Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science
at University College London in 1963, and a Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Philosophy
at the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine in 1966. From 1966 to 1973, he was a Postdoctoral Researcher and Teaching Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, Queen Elizabeth College
Queen Elizabeth College
and the University of Cambridge
[...More...]

"Colin Groves" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ernst Haeckel
Ernst Heinrich Philipp August Haeckel (German: [ˈhɛkəl]; 16 February 1834 – 9 August 1919[1]) was a German biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor, marine biologist, and artist who discovered, described and named thousands of new species, mapped a genealogical tree relating all life forms, and coined many terms in biology, including anthropogeny, ecology, phylum, phylogeny, stem cell, and Protista. Haeckel promoted and popularised Charles Darwin's work in Germany and developed the influential but no longer widely held recapitulation theory ("ontogeny recapitulates phylogeny") claiming that an individual organism's biological development, or ontogeny, parallels and summarises its species' evolutionary development, or phylogeny. The published artwork of Haeckel includes over 100 detailed, multi-colour illustrations of animals and sea creatures (see: Kunstformen der Natur, "Art Forms of Nature")
[...More...]

"Ernst Haeckel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cladistically
Cladistics (from Greek κλάδος, klados, i.e., "branch")[1] is an approach to biological classification in which organisms are categorized in groups ("clades") based on the most recent common ancestor. Hypothesized relationships are typically based on shared derived characteristics (synapomorphies) that can be traced to the most recent common ancestor and are not present in more distant groups and ancestors. A key feature of a clade is that all descendants stay in their overarching ancestral clade. Radiation results in the generation of new subclades by bifurcation.[2][3][4][5] The techniques and nomenclature of cladistics have been applied to other disciplines
[...More...]

"Cladistically" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jan Van Der Hoeven
Jan van der Hoeven (9 February 1801[1] – 10 March 1868) was a Dutch zoologist. His most famous book is "Handboek der Dierkunde" (1827–1833), translated into German and English (by prof. Clark). He wrote as readily about crocodiles as about butterflies, lancelets and lemurs. His research on the nautilus resulted in the discovery of a secondary sexual organ of unknown function which was then named after him as Hoeven's organ or Van der Hoeven's organ.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 References 3 Further reading 4 Works 5 External linksBiography[edit] Jan van der Hoeven came from a wealthy family of merchants in Rotterdam. In 1819 he moved to Leiden. In 1822 he got a degree in physics and in 1824 in medicine. After a visit to Paris he started working as a family doctor in Rotterdam, but in 1826 he was appointed Professor of Zoology and Mineralogy at the University of Leiden. He married in that year to Anna van Stolk
[...More...]

"Jan Van Der Hoeven" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tarsiiformes
See text Tarsiiformes
Tarsiiformes
are a group of primates that once ranged across Europe, northern Africa, Asia, and North America, but whose extant species are all found in the islands of Southeast Asia. Tarsiers (family Tarsiidae) are the only living members of the infraorder, and also include the extinct Tarsius eocaenus from the Eocene[2] and Tarsius thailandicus from the Miocene.[3] Two extinct genera, Xanthorhysis and Afrotarsius, are considered to be close relatives of the living tarsiers and are generally classified within Tarsiiformes, with the former grouped within family Tarsiidae and the latter listed as incertae sedis (undefined).[2] Omomyids are generally considered to be extinct relatives, or even ancestors, of the living tarsiers and are often classified within Tarsiiformes
[...More...]

"Tarsiiformes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cenozoic Era
The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era ( /ˌsiːnəˈzoʊɪk, ˌsɛ-/)[1][2] is the current geological era, covering the period from 66 million years ago to the present day. The Cenozoic
Cenozoic
is also known as the Age of Mammals, because of the large mammals that dominate it. The continents also moved into their current positions during this era.Contents1 Nomenclature 2 Divisions2.1 Paleogene Period 2.2 Neogene 2.3 Quaternary3 Animal life 4 Tectonics 5 Climate 6 Life 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksNomenclature[edit] Cenozoic, meaning "new life," is derived from Greek καινός kainós "new," and ζωή zōḗ "life."[3] The era is also known as the Cænozoic, Caenozoic, or Cainozoic
[...More...]

"Cenozoic Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Robert Hoffstetter
Robert Julien Hoffstetter (11 June 1908 – 29 December 1999) was a 20th-century taxonomist who was influential in categorizing reptiles.[1] He labeled the Bolyeriidae
Bolyeriidae
and Madtsoiidae
Madtsoiidae
family of snakes. References[edit]^ "EN MEMORIA DEL PROFESOR ROBERT HOFFSTETTER (1908-1999)" (PDF). Bull. Inst. fr. études andines. 29 (1): 139
[...More...]

"Robert Hoffstetter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paleoanthropology
Paleoanthropology
Paleoanthropology
or paleo-anthropology is a branch of archaeology with a human focus, which seeks to understand the early development of anatomically modern humans, a process known as hominization, through the reconstruction of evolutionary kinship lines within the family Hominidae, working from biological evidence (such as petrified skeletal remains, bone fragments, footprints) and cultural evidence (such as stone tools, artifacts, and settlement localities).[1][2] The field draws from and combines paleontology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology
[...More...]

"Paleoanthropology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.