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Shipwreck
A shipwreck is the remains of a ship that has wrecked, which are found either beached on land or sunken to the bottom of a body of water. Shipwrecking
Shipwrecking
may be deliberate or accidental
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Wood
Wood
Wood
is a porous and fibrous structural tissue found in the stems and roots of trees and other woody plants. It is an organic material, a natural composite of cellulose fibers that are strong in tension and embedded in a matrix of lignin that resists compression. Wood
Wood
is sometimes defined as only the secondary xylem in the stems of trees,[1] or it is defined more broadly to include the same type of tissue elsewhere such as in the roots of trees or shrubs.[citation needed] In a living tree it performs a support function, enabling woody plants to grow large or to stand up by themselves. It also conveys water and nutrients between the leaves, other growing tissues, and the roots
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Salinity
Salinity
Salinity
is the saltiness or amount of salt dissolved in a body of water (see also soil salinity). This is usually measured in g   salt k g   sea   water displaystyle frac g textrm salt kg textrm sea textrm water (note that this is technically dimensionless)
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Port Authority
In Canada and the United States, port authority (less commonly a port district) is a governmental or quasi-governmental public authority for a special-purpose district usually formed by a legislative body (or bodies) to operate ports and other transportation infrastructure. Most port authorities are financially self-supporting
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Strait Of Magellan
The Strait
Strait
of Magellan (Spanish: Estrecho de Magallanes), also called the Straits of Magellan, is a navigable sea route in southern Chile separating mainland South America
South America
to the north and Tierra del Fuego
Tierra del Fuego
to the south. The strait is the most important natural passage between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is considered a difficult route to navigate due to the narrowness of the passage and unpredictable winds and currents. It is shorter and more sheltered than the often stormy Drake Passage
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Cargo
In economics, cargo or freight are goods or produce being conveyed – generally for commercial gain – by water, air or land. Cargo
Cargo
was originally a shipload. Cargo
Cargo
now covers all types of freight, including that carried by train, van, truck, or intermodal container.[1] The term cargo is also used in case of goods in the cold-chain, because the perishable inventory is always in transit towards a final end-use, even when it is held in cold storage or other similar climate-controlled facility. Multi-modal container units, designed as reusable carriers to facilitate unit load handling of the goods contained, are also referred to as cargo, specially by shipping lines and logistics operators. Similarly, aircraft ULD boxes are also documented as cargo, with associated packing list of the items contained within
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Fire
Fire
Fire
is the rapid oxidation of a material in the exothermic chemical process of combustion, releasing heat, light, and various reaction products.[1] Slower oxidative processes like rusting or digestion are not included by this definition. Fire
Fire
is hot because the conversion of the weak double bond in molecular oxygen, O2, to the stronger bonds in the combustion products carbon dioxide and water releases energy (418 kJ per 32 g of O2); the bond energies of the fuel play only a minor role here.[2] At a certain point in the combustion reaction, called the ignition point, flames are produced. The flame is the visible portion of the fire
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War
War
War
is a state of armed conflict between states or societies. It is generally characterized by extreme aggression, destruction, and mortality, using regular or irregular military forces. An absence of war is usually called "peace". Warfare refers to the common activities and characteristics of types of war, or of wars in general.[1] Total war is warfare that is not restricted to purely legitimate military targets, and can result in massive civilian or other non-combatant suffering and casualties. While some scholars see war as a universal and ancestral aspect of human nature,[2] others argue it is a result of specific socio-cultural or ecological circumstances.[3] The deadliest war in history, in terms of the cumulative number of deaths since its start, is World War
War
II, from 1939 to 1945, with 60–85 million deaths, followed by the Mongol conquests[4] at up to 60 million
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Recreational Diving
Recreational diving
Recreational diving
or sport diving is diving for the purpose of leisure and enjoyment, usually when using scuba equipment. The term "recreational diving" may also be used in contradistinction to "technical diving", a more demanding aspect of recreational diving which requires greater levels of training, experience and equipment to compensate for the more hazardous conditions associated with the disciplines.[nb 1][1] Breath-hold diving for recreation also fits into the broader scope of the term, but this article covers the commonly used meaning of scuba diving for recreational purposes, where the diver is not constrained from making a direct near-vertical ascent to the surface at any point during the dive. The equipment used for recreational diving is mostly open circuit scuba, though semi closed and fully automated electronic closed circuit rebreathers may be included in the scope of recreational diving
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Sabotage
Sabotage
Sabotage
is a deliberate action aimed at weakening a polity, effort or organization through subversion, obstruction, disruption or destruction. One who engages in sabotage is a saboteur. Saboteurs typically try to conceal their identities because of the consequences of their actions. Any unexplained adverse condition might be sabotage
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Target Practice
Target practice
Target practice
refers to any exercise in which projectiles are fired at a specified target, usually to improve the aim of the person or persons firing the weapon. The abbreviation TP is commonly used for "target practice" rounds. TP-T is a target practice round with tracer.Contents1 Examples1.1 United States Navy 1.2 Video Games2 See also 3 ReferencesExamples[edit] United States Navy[edit] The United States Navy
United States Navy
previously used decommissioned ships for practice. Currently they use remote control watercraft such as the QST-35, FACT, HSMST and SDST to practice on moving targets at variable speeds.[1] Video Games[edit] The video game character Lyris Titanborn from the video game 'Elder Scrolls Online' refers to your character as "Target Practice" while playing through the games tutorial
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Breakwater (structure)
Breakwaters are structures constructed on coasts as part of coastal management or to protect an anchorage from the effects of both weather and longshore drift.Contents1 Purposes of breakwaters 2 Unintended consequences 3 Construction 4 Types of breakwater structures 5 Breakwater Armour Units 6 Notable locations 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksPurposes of breakwaters[edit]Barra da Tijuca - Rio de JaneiroBreakwaters reduce the intensity of wave action in inshore waters and thereby reduce coastal erosion or provide safe harbourage. Breakwaters may also be small structures designed to protect a gently sloping beach and placed one to three hundred feet offshore in relatively shallow water. An anchorage is only safe if ships anchored there are protected from the force of high winds and powerful waves by some large underwater barrier which they can shelter behind. Natural harbours are formed by such barriers as headlands or reefs
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Colonisation
Colonization
Colonization
(or colonisation) is a process by which a central system of power dominates the surrounding land and its components. The term is derived from the Latin word colere, which means "to inhabit".[1] Also, colonization refers strictly to migration, for example, to settler colonies in America or Australia, trading posts, and plantations, while colonialism to the existing indigenous peoples of styled "new territories". Colonization
Colonization
was linked to the spread of tens of millions from Western European states all over the world. In many settled colonies, Western European settlers formed a large majority of the population. Examples include the Americas, Australia and New Zealand. These colonies were occasionally called 'neo-Europes'
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Punta Arenas
Punta Arenas
Punta Arenas
(Spanish pronunciation: [ˈpunta aˈɾenas]; historically Sandy Point in English) is the capital city of Chile's southernmost region, Magallanes and Antartica Chilena. The city was officially renamed as Magallanes in 1927, but in 1938 it was changed back to "Punta Arenas". It is the largest city south of the 46th parallel south
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Baltic Sea
The Baltic Sea
Sea
is a sea of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Scandinavia, Finland, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Russia, Poland, Germany
Germany
and the North and Central European Plain. The sea stretches from 53°N to 66°N latitude and from 10°E to 30°E longitude. A mediterranean sea of the Atlantic, with limited water exchange between the two bodies, the Baltic Sea
Sea
drains through the Danish islands into the Kattegat
Kattegat
by way of the straits of Øresund, the Great Belt, and the Little Belt
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Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(/ˌmæsəˈtʃuːsɪts/ ( listen), /-zɪts/), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England
New England
region of the northeastern United States. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the east, the states of Connecticut
Connecticut
and Rhode Island
Rhode Island
to the south, New Hampshire
New Hampshire
and Vermont
Vermont
to the north, and New York to the west. The state is named after the Massachusett
Massachusett
tribe, which once inhabited the east side of the area. The capital of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and the most populous city in New England
New England
is Boston
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