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S/S Ukkopekka
SS Ukkopekka is a Finnish steamship in service as a tourist and heritage attraction. The ship was built at Wärtsilä Hietalahti Shipyard in Helsinki, Finland in 1938 and was at the time a modern, icebreaking inspection vessel. The vessel was the first inspection vessel in independent Finland, built by the Finns for the National Board of Navigation, and her year of manufacture is the same as that of the icebreaker Sisu. She was originally known as Inspection vessel SS Turku and was built to the hull designs of SS Sisu, the only alterations being that of the scale. Thus SS Ukkopekka is probably the last sea-going passenger steamer designed for icebreaking still in active service. The original engine of SS Ukkopekka was a triple expansion steam engine, built in Helsinki in 1937, and originally designed for warships by the Germans
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Steamship
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam-powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines[1] that typically move (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer (using a propeller or screw). As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steamship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels. As steamships were less dependent on wind patterns, new trade routes opened up
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Steam Engine

A steam engine is a heat engine that performs mechanical work using steam as its working fluid. The steam engine uses the force produced by steam pressure to push a piston back and forth inside a cylinder. This pushing force is transformed, by a connecting rod and flywheel, into rotational force for work. The term "steam engine" is generally applied only to reciprocating engines as just described, not to the steam turbine. Steam engines are external combustion engines,[1] where the working fluid is separated from the combustion products
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Propeller
A propeller is a device with a rotating hub and radiating blades that are set at a pitch to form a helical spiral, that, when rotated, performs an action which is similar to Archimedes' screw. It transforms rotational power into linear thrust by acting upon a working fluid, such as water or air.[1] The rotational motion of the blades is converted into thrust by creating a pressure difference between the two surfaces. A given mass of working fluid is accelerated in one direction and the craft moves in the opposite direction. Propeller dynamics, like those of aircraft wings, can be modelled by Bernoulli's principle and Newton's third law.[2] Most marine propellers are screw propellers with helical blades rotating on a propeller shaft with an approximately horizontal axis.[3] The principle employed in using a screw propeller is derived from sculling
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RMS Titanic
Coordinates: 41°43′57″N 49°56′49″W / 41.73250°N 49.94694°W / 41.73250; -49.94694 RMS Titanic was a British passenger liner operated by the White Star Line that sank in the North Atlantic Ocean in the early morning hours of 15 April 1912, after striking an iceberg during her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. Of the estimated 2,224 passengers and crew aboard, more than 1,500 died, making the sinking one of modern history's deadliest peacetime commercial marine disasters. RMS Titanic was the largest ship afloat at the time she entered service and was the second of three Olympic-class ocean liners operated by the White Star Line. She was built by the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast
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RMS Lusitania

RMS Lusitania was a British ocean liner that was sunk on 7 May 1915 by a German U-boat 11 miles (18 km) off the southern coast of Ireland, killing 1,198 passengers and crew. The sinking presaged the United States declaration of war on Germany. Although the Lusitania sinking was a major factor in building support for a war, a declaration of war did not take place until nearly two years later, after repeated attacks and German use of unrestricted warfare against American shipping. Lusitania held the Blue Riband appellation for the fastest Atlantic crossing and was briefly the world's largest passenger ship until the completion of the Mauretania three months later. The Cunard Line launched her in 1906 at a time of fierce competition for the North Atlantic trade
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Monitor (warship)
A monitor was a relatively small warship which was neither fast nor strongly armored but carried disproportionately large guns. They were used by some navies from the 1860s, during the First World War and with limited use in the Second World War. During the Vietnam War they were used by the United States Navy.[1] The Brazilian Navy's Parnaíba is the last monitor in service. The original monitor was designed in 1861 by John Ericsson, who named it USS Monitor. They were designed for shallow waters and served as coastal ships
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Thomas Clyde (businessman)
Thomas Clyde (1812 - January 12, 1885) was a ship-owner, founder of the Clyde Line of steamers, and a civil and marine engineer who built the first commercial screw steamer in America.[1] He was born in Ireland and emigrated to the United States at the age of eight. He lived in Philadelphia with his uncle until they relocated to Chester, Pennsylvania in 1826. Clyde and Edward Darlington co-owned a spinning mill on Chester Creek in Pennsylvania[2] and another mill on the Brandywine River in Delaware.[3] He worked for his uncle's grocery business until 1832 and then took charge of a stone quarry on Ridley Creek. The quarry provided huge blocks of stone ranging between two and seven tons to the U.S. Government for the construction of the Delaware Breakwater near Cape Henlopen, Delaware. The stones were carried to Cape Henlopen by large sloops
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