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Saying
A saying is any concisely written or spoken expression that is especially memorable because of its meaning or style
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Synonym
A synonym is a word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language. Words that are synonyms are said to be synonymous, and the state of being a synonym is called synonymy. For example, the words begin, start, commence, and initiate are all synonyms of one another. Words are typically synonymous in one particular sense: for example, long and extended in the context long time or extended time are synonymous, but long cannot be used in the phrase extended family. Synonyms with the exact same meaning share a seme or denotational sememe, whereas those with inexactly similar meanings share a broader denotational or connotational sememe and thus overlap within a semantic field
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Literal And Figurative Language
Literal and figurative language is a distinction within some fields of language analysis, in particular stylistics, rhetoric, and semantics.Literal language uses words exactly according to their conventionally accepted meanings or denotation. Figurative (or non-literal) language uses words in a way that deviates from their conventionally accepted definitions in order to convey a more complicated meaning or heightened effect.[1] Figurative language is often created by presenting words in such a way that they are equated, compared, or associated with normally unrelated meanings.Literal usage confers meaning to words, in the sense of the meaning they have by themselves, outside any figure of speech.[2] It maintains a consistent meaning regardless of the context,[
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Folk Etymology
Folk etymology or reanalysis – sometimes called pseudo-etymology, popular etymology, or analogical reformation – is a change in a word or phrase resulting from the replacement of an unfamiliar form by a more familiar one.[1][2][3] The form or the meaning of an archaic, foreign, or otherwise unfamiliar word is reanalyzed as resembling more familiar words or morphemes. Rebracketing is a form of folk etymology in which a word is broken down or "bracketed" into a new set of supposed elements
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Oral Tradition
Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another.[1][2][3] The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history, oral literature, oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system, or in parallel to a writing system
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Witticism
Wit
Wit
is a form of intelligent humour, the ability to say or write things that are clever and usually funny.[1] A wit is a person skilled at making clever and funny remarks.[1][2] Forms of wit include the quip, repartee, and wisecrack.Contents1 Forms 2 In poetry 3 Further meanings 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyForms[edit] As in the wit of Dorothy Parker's set, the Algonquin Round Table, witty remarks may be intentionally cruel (as in many epigrams), and perhaps more ingenious than funny. A quip is an observation or saying that has some wit but perhaps descends into sarcasm, or otherwise is short of a point, and a witticism also suggests the diminutive
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Motto
Heraldry
Heraldry
portalv t eA motto (derived from the Latin
Latin
muttum, 'mutter', by way of Italian motto, 'word', 'sentence')[1][2][3] is a maxim; a phrase meant to formally summarize the general motivation or intention of an individual, family, social group or organization.[2][3] Mottos are usually not expressed verbally,[clarification needed] unlike slogans, but are expressed in writing and usually stem from long traditions of social foundations, or also from significant events, such as a civil war or a revolution. A motto may be in any language, but Latin
Latin
has been widely used, especially in the Western world.Contents1 Heraldry 2 Literature 3 See also 4 ReferencesHeraldry[edit] In heraldry, a motto is often found below the shield in a banderole; this placement stems from the Middle Ages, in which the vast majority of nobles possessed a coat of arms and a motto
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Legal Maxim
A legal maxim is an established principle or proposition of law in Western civilization, and a species of aphorism and general maxim. The word is apparently a variant of the Latin
Latin
maxima, but this latter word is not found in extant texts of Roman law
Roman law
with any denotation exactly analogous to that of a legal maxim in the Medieval or modern definition, but the treatises of many of the Roman jurists on regular definitiones and sententiae iuris are to some degree collections of maxims. Most of the Latin
Latin
maxims originate from the Medieval era
Medieval era
in European states that used Latin
Latin
as their legal language. The attitude of early English commentators towards the maximal of the law was one of unmingled adulation. In Thomas Hobbes, Doctor and Student (p. 26), they are described as of the same strength and effect in the law as statutes
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Brocard (law)
A brocard is a legal maxim in Latin
Latin
that is, in a strict sense, derived from traditional legal authorities, even from ancient Rome. The word is a variant of the Latinized name
Latinized name
of Burchard of Worms
Burchard of Worms
(died AD 1025), Bishop of Worms, Germany, who compiled 20 volumes of Ecclesiastical Rules.Contents1 History 2 Examples 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Begun in AD 1008, the materials took Burchard four years to compile. He wrote it while living in a small structure on top of a hill in the forest outside Worms, after his defeat of Duke Otto and while raising his adopted child
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Morality
Morality
Morality
(from Latin: mōrālis, lit. 'manner, character, proper behavior') is the differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper.[1] Morality
Morality
can be a body of standards or principles derived from a code of conduct from a particular philosophy, religion or culture, or it can derive from a standard that a person believes should be universal.[2] Morality
Morality
may also be specifically synonymous with "goodness" or "rightness". Moral philosophy includes moral ontology, which is the origin of morals; and moral epistemology, which is the knowledge of morals. Different systems of expressing morality have been proposed, including deontological ethical systems which adhere to a set of established rules, and normative ethical systems which consider the merits of actions themselves
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Mantra
A "mantra" (/ˈmæntrə, ˈmɑːn-, ˈmʌn-/ (Sanskrit: मन्त्र);[2]) is a sacred utterance, a numinous sound, a syllable, word or phonemes, or group of words in Sanskrit
Sanskrit
believed by practitioners to have psychological and spiritual powers.[3][4] Mantra meditation helps to induce an altered state of consciousness.[5] A mantra may or may not have a syntactic structure or literal meaning.[3][6] The earliest mantras were composed in Vedic
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Yojijukugo
Yojijukugo
Yojijukugo
(Japanese: 四字熟語) is a Japanese lexeme consisting of four kanji (Chinese characters). English translations of yojijukugo include "four-character compound", "four-character idiom", "four-character idiomatic phrase", and "four-character idiomatic compound". It is equivalent to the Chinese chengyu.by Saigō Takamori
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Sajaseong-eo
In Korean, sajaseong-eo (Hangul: 사자성어; Hanja: 四字成語) are four-character idioms, the analog of Chinese chengyu and Japanese yojijukugo, and generally but not always of Chinese origin.[1] They have analogous categorization to the analogs in other languages, such as gosaseong-eo (고사성어; 故事成語) for historical idioms. A list (in Korean) can be found at 부록:사자성어; a list with English translations may be found at: "Structure of four character idioms". References[edit]^ Structure of Korean IdiomsThis Korea-related article is a stub
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Chengyu
Chengyu
Chengyu
(simplified Chinese: 成语; traditional Chinese: 成語, pinyin: chéngyǔ, lit. "set phrases") are a type of traditional Chinese idiomatic expression, most of which consist of four characters. Chengyu
Chengyu
were widely used in Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
and are still common in vernacular Chinese writing and in the spoken language today
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Four-character Idiom (other)
Four-character idiom may refer to:Chengyu, a type of traditional Chinese idiomatic expressions, most of which consist of four characters Sajaseong-eo, a Korean lexeme consisting of four hanja Yojijukugo, a Japanese lexeme consisting of four kanjiThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Four-character idiom. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Kick The Bucket
To kick the bucket is an English idiom, considered a euphemistic, informal, or slang term meaning 'to die'.[1] Its origin remains unclear, though there have been several theories.Contents1 Origin theories 2 American variations 3 See also 4 ReferencesOrigin theories[edit] A common theory is that the idiom refers to hanging, either as a method of execution or suicide. However, there is no evidence to support this
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