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SD60M
The EMD SD60
EMD SD60
is a 3,800 horsepower (2,800 kW), 6-axle diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division. Intended for heavy-duty drag freight or medium-speed freight service. It was introduced in 1984, and production ran until 1995.Contents1 History and development 2 Models2.1 SD60 2.2 SD60F 2.3 SD60I 2.4 SD60M 2.5 SD60MAC 2.6 SD60E3 Original owners 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory and development[edit] The development of the 16-cylinder EMD 50 and 60 series locomotives in the late 1970s and early 1980s was spurred by the introduction of 3,600 horsepower (2,700 kW) 16-cylinder GE B36-7
GE B36-7
(B-B) and GE C36-7 (C-C) locomotives by EMD's main competitor General Electric. EMD previously manufactured the 3,600 hp (2,700 kW) 20-cylinder SD45 and SD45-2 locomotives, but they had a reputation for high fuel consumption
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Diesel-electric
A diesel–electric transmission, or diesel–electric powertrain, is used by a number of vehicle and ship types for providing locomotion. A diesel–electric transmission system includes a diesel engine connected to an electrical generator, creating electricity that powers electric traction motors. No clutch is required. Before diesel engines came into widespread use, a similar system, using a petrol (gasoline) engine and called petrol–electric or gas–electric, was sometimes used. Diesel–electric transmission
Diesel–electric transmission
is used on railways by diesel electric locomotives and diesel electric multiple units, as electric motors are able to supply full torque at 0 RPM
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Plymouth, Michigan
Plymouth is a city in Wayne County in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Michigan
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GE C36-7
The GE C36-7
GE C36-7
is a 6-axle diesel-electric locomotive built by GE Transportation Systems, GE do Brazil and A Goninan & Co between 1978 and 1989. 599 examples of this locomotive were built, 422 of which were exported to the People's Republic of China, where it is designated as ND5. In 2003 58 ex MP / UP locos were exported to Estonia. GE do Brazil built 15 C36-7s for Ferrocarriles Nacionales de México, numbers 9327–9341. Original owners[edit]Railroad Quantity Road numbers China
China
Railways 422 ND5.0001–ND5.0422Conrail 25 6620–6644Ferrocarril del Pacífico 15 419–433General Electric (testbed) 1 505Hamersley Iron, Western Australia 3 5057–5059[1]Missouri Pacific Railroad 60 9000–9059Ferrocarriles Nacionales de México 25 9317–9341Norfolk and Western Railway 31 8500–8530Norfolk Southern 12 8531–8542OCTRA (Trans-Gabon Railway) 8 CC301–CC308References[edit]^ Oberg, Leon (2010)
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GE Transportation Systems
GE Transportation, formerly known as GE Rail, is a division of General Electric. The organization manufactures equipment for the railroad, marine, mining, drilling and energy generation industries. It is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois
Illinois
while their main manufacturing facility is located in Fort Worth, Texas
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V20 Engine
A V20 engine
V20 engine
is a V engine
V engine
with 20 cylinders, arranged in two banks of 10. Engines of this number of cylinders are not found in production cars, but this configuration is used in some diesel locomotives, haul trucks, generators and marine applications. For example, the 1960s EMD SD45
EMD SD45
diesel-electric locomotive is fitted with a 20-cylinder EMD 645E3
EMD 645E3
two-stroke engine. The engine name is based on the displacement of each cylinder in cubic inches. In this case, it is 645 cubic inches (10.6 L) for each of 20 cylinders for a total of 211 L
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General Motors Corporation
General Motors
General Motors
Company,[1] commonly abbreviated as GM, is an American multinational corporation headquartered in Detroit
Detroit
that designs, manufactures, markets, and distributes vehicles and vehicle parts, and sells financial services. With global headquarters in Detroit's Renaissance Center, GM manufactures cars and trucks in 35 countries. In 2008, 8.35 million[6] GM cars and trucks were sold globally under various brands. GM reached the milestone of selling 10 million vehicles in 2016.[7] Current auto brands are Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, and Wuling. Former GM automotive brands include Daewoo, McLaughlin, Oakland, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, Hummer, Saab, Saturn, as well as Vauxhall and Opel, which were bought by Groupe PSA
Groupe PSA
in 2017. The company was founded by William C. Durant
William C. Durant
on September 16, 1908 as a holding company
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Microprocessor
A microprocessor is a computer processor which incorporates the functions of a computer's central processing unit (CPU) on a single integrated circuit (IC),[1] or at most a few integrated circuits.[2] The microprocessor is a multipurpose, clock driven, register based, digital-integrated circuit which accepts binary data as input, processes it according to instructions stored in its memory, and provides results as output. Microprocessors contain both combinational logic and sequential digital logic. Microprocessors operate on numbers and symbols represented in the binary numeral system. The integration of a whole CPU
CPU
onto a single chip or on a few chips greatly reduced the cost of processing power, increasing efficiency. Integrated circuit
Integrated circuit
processors are produced in large numbers by highly automated processes resulting in a low per unit cost
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Fuel Efficiency
Fuel
Fuel
efficiency is a form of thermal efficiency, meaning the ratio from effort to result of a process that converts chemical potential energy contained in a carrier (fuel) into kinetic energy or work. Overall fuel efficiency may vary per device, which in turn may vary per application fuel efficiency, especially fossil fuel power plants or industries dealing with combustion, such as ammonia production during the Haber process. In the context of transport, fuel economy is the energy efficiency of a particular vehicle, given as a ratio of distance traveled per unit of fuel consumed. It is dependent on engine efficiency, transmission design, and tire design. Fuel
Fuel
economy is expressed in miles per gallon (mpg) in the USA and usually also in the UK (imperial gallon); there is sometimes confusion as the imperial gallon is 20% larger than the US gallon
US gallon
so that mpg values are not directly comparable
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Hood Unit
A hood unit, in North American railroad terminology, is a body style for diesel and electric locomotives. On a hood unit, the body of the locomotive is less than full-width for most of the locomotive's length, with walkways on the outside of the locomotive. In contrast, a cab unit has a full-width carbody for the length of the locomotive. A hood unit has sufficient visibility to be operated in both directions from a single cab. Also, the underframe is the main load-bearing member, allowing the hood to be non-structural and easily opened or even removed for maintenance.Contents1 History 2 Operation 3 Freight-oriented hood units 4 Passenger-oriented hood units 5 United Kingdom 6 France 7 TurkeyHistory[edit] The hood unit evolved from the switcher locomotive. A switcher's long hood is normally low enough that the crew can see over it, and there typically is no short hood
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Diesel-electric Locomotive
A diesel locomotive is a type of railway locomotive in which the prime mover is a diesel engine. Several types of diesel locomotive have been developed, differing mainly in the means by which mechanical power is conveyed to the driving wheels (drivers). Early internal combustion engine-powered locomotives and railcars used kerosene and gasoline as their fuel. Soon after Dr. Rudolf Diesel patented his first compression ignition engine[1] in 1898, it was considered for railway propulsion. Progress was slow, however, as several problems had to be overcome. Power transmission was a primary concern. As opposed to steam and electric engines, internal combustion engines work efficiently only within a limited range of turning frequencies. In light vehicles, this could be overcome by a clutch. In heavy railway vehicles, mechanical transmission never worked well or wore out too soon
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Canadian National Railway
The Canadian
The Canadian
National Railway Company (reporting mark CN) (French: Compagnie des chemins de fer nationaux du Canada) is a Canadian Class I freight railway headquartered in Montreal, Quebec
Quebec
that serves Canada and the Midwestern and Southern United States. CN's slogan is "North America's Railroad". CN is a public company with 24,000 employees.[1] It had a market capitalization of 32 billion CAD in 2011.[2] CN was government-owned, having been a Canadian Crown corporation from its founding to its privatization in 1995
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Cowl Unit
A cowl unit is a body style of diesel locomotive. The terminology is a North American one, though similar locomotives exist elsewhere. A cowl unit is one with full-width enclosing bodywork, similar to the cab unit style of earlier locomotives, but unlike the cab unit style, the bodywork is merely a casing and is not load-bearing. All the strength is in the locomotive's frame, beneath the floor, rather than the bridge-truss load-bearing carbody of the earlier type. Cowl units were originally produced at the request of the Santa Fe, had a full-width 'cowl' body built on a hood unit frame which provided all the structural strength; the bodywork was cosmetic, rather than a load-bearing bridge truss frame as in cab units. Most cowl units have been passenger-hauling locomotives. In this service, the cowl unit's full width bodywork and sleek sides match the passenger cars, do not allow unwanted riders, and allow the decorative, advertising paintwork desired by passenger operators
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Consolidated Rail Corporation
Conrail, the Consolidated Rail Corporation, (reporting mark CR), was the primary Class I railroad
Class I railroad
in the Northeastern United States
Northeastern United States
between 1976 and 1999, when its routes were split between the CSX Corporation and Norfolk Southern Railway. Conrail, a portmanteau of "consolidated" and "rail" from the name of the company, operates now as a joint-subsidiary for some limited functions. The Federal Government created Conrail
Conrail
to take over the potentially profitable lines of multiple bankrupt carriers, including the Penn Central Transportation Company and Erie Lackawanna
Erie Lackawanna
Railway. After railroad regulations were lifted by the 4R Act and the Staggers Act, Conrail
Conrail
began to turn a profit in the 1980s and was turned over to private investors in 1987
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Short Hood
The short hood of a hood unit-style diesel locomotive is, as the name implies, the shorter of the two hoods (narrower sections of the locomotive body in front and behind of the cab) on a locomotive. The short hood contains ancillary equipment, frequently a chemical-retention toilet for crew use, and may contain a steam generator for heating older-style passenger cars.Contents1 Styles1.1 High 1.2 Low 1.3 Full width2 Great Britain 3 ReferencesStyles[edit] High[edit] Normally, the short hood is the front of the locomotive, and may be referred to as the locomotive's "nose". Originally, this was not the case; railroads preferred to have the long hood leading, for additional crew protection in a collision. The requirement for increased visibility conflicted with this and ultimately gained precedence. Many locomotives originally had a short hood the full height of the locomotive (a high short hood)
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F59PH
The EMD F59PH
EMD F59PH
is a four-axle 3,000 hp (2 MW) B-B diesel-electric locomotive built by General Motors Electro-Motive Division in two variants from 1988 to 2001. The original F59PH was designed in consultation with GO Transit
GO Transit
for commuter operation in Toronto. The design was successful and became the backbone of GO Transit's fleet for two decades. Another major operator is Southern California's Metrolink, which launched with F59PHs in 1992. Production of the F59PH ended in 1994, with 73 locomotives built. The F59PHI was designed for Amtrak California
Amtrak California
intercity service and began production in 1994. It is distinguished from the F59PH by its streamlined cab
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