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    Resurrection Of Jesus
    The resurrection of Jesus or resurrection of Christ is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus in Christianity">Jesus rose again from the dead
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    Priesthood (Catholic Church)
    Unlike usage in English, "the Latin words sacerdos and sacerdotium are used to refer in general to the ministerial priesthood shared by bishops and presbyters. The words presbyter, presbyterium and presbyteratus refer to priests in the English use of the word or presbyters." According to the Annuario Pontificio 2016, as of December 31, 2014, there were 415,792 Catholic priests worldwide, including both diocesan priests and priests in the religious orders. A priest of the regular clergy is commonly addressed with the title "Father" (abbreviated Fr., in the Roman Catholic and some other Christian churches). The state of consecrated life or monasticism is a separate, third distinct vocational state from the clergy and the laity. As an overview, there are the members of the laity—who are married or unmarried, and the clergy—the bishops, priests, and deacons
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    Catholic (other)
    Catholic may refer to:

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    Mariology Of The Catholic Church
    Mariology of the Catholic Church is the systematic study of the person of Mary, mother of Jesus, and of her place in the Economy of Salvation, within Catholic theology. Mary is seen as having a singular dignity above the saints. The Catholic Church teaches that she was conceived without original sin therefore receiving a higher level of veneration than all other saints. Catholic Mariology thus studies not only her life but also the veneration of her in daily life, prayer, hymns, art, music, and architecture in modern and ancient Christianity throughout the ages. The four dogmas of perpetual virginity, Mother of God, Immaculate Conception and Assumption form the basis of Mariology
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    Jesus
    Jesus (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ, was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader. He is the central figure of Christianity
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    Crucifixion Of Jesus
    The crucifixion of Jesus occurred in Christianity in the 1st century">1st century Judea, most likely between AD 30 and 33. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources, although among historians, there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred. According to the canonical gospels, Jesus in Christianity">Jesus, the Christ, was arrested and tried by the Sanhedrin, and then sentenced by Pontius Pilate to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans. Jesus was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with myrrh or gall to drink before being crucified
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    Ascension Of Jesus
    According to the Bible, the Ascension of Jesus (anglicized from the Vulgate Latin Bible (American Standard)/Acts">Acts 1:9-11 section title: Ascensio Iesu) is the departure of Christ from Earth into the presence of
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    Jerusalem
    Jerusalem (/əˈrsələm/; Hebrew language">Hebrew: David CLM', 'Taamey Frank CLM', 'Frenk Ruehl CLM', 'Keter YG', 'Shofar', ' David CLM', 'Hadasim CLM', 'Simple CLM', 'Nachlieli', 'SBL BibLit', 'SBL Hebrew', Cardo, Alef, 'Noto Serif Hebrew', 'Noto Sans Hebrew', ' David Libre', David, 'Times New Roman', Gisha, Arial, FreeSerif, FreeSans;" dir="rtl">יְרוּשָׁלַיִםAbout this sound Yerushaláyim; Arabic: القُدسAbout this sound al-Quds) is a city in the Middle East, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea
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    Early Christianity
    Early Christianity is the period of Christianity preceding the First Council of Nicaea in 325. It is typically divided into the Apostolic Age and the Ante-Nicene Period (from the Apostolic Age until Nicea). The first Christians, as described in the first chapters of the Acts of the Apostles, were all Jews either by birth or conversion, for which the biblical term "proselyte" is used, and referred to by historians as Jewish Christians. The early Gospel message was spread orally, probably in Aramaic, but almost immediately also in Greek. The New Testament's Acts of the Apostles and Epistle to the Galatians record that the first Christian community was centered in Jerusalem and its leaders included Peter, James, the brother of Jesus, and John the Apostle. After the conversion of Paul the Apostle, he claimed the title of "Apostle to the Gentiles"
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    History Of The Papacy
    The history of the papacy, the office held by the pope as head of the Roman Catholic Church, according to Catholic doctrine, spans from the time of Peter to the present day. During the Early Church, the bishops of Rome enjoyed no temporal power Rome under Constantine I">until the time of Constantine. After the fall of Rome (the "Middle Ages", about 476), the papacy was influenced by the temporal rulers of the surrounding Italian Peninsula; these periods are known as the Ostrogothic Papacy, Byzantine Papacy, and Frankish Papacy. Over time, the papacy consolidated its territorial claims to a portion of the peninsula known as the Papal States
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    Four Marks Of The Church
    The Four Marks of the Church is a term describing four distinctive adjectives — "One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic" — of Christian tradition">traditional
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    Latin Church
    The Latin Church, sometimes called the Western Church, is the largest particular church sui iuris in full communion with the Pope and the rest of the Catholic Church, tracing its history to the earliest days of Christianity. Employing the Latin liturgical rites, with 1.255 billion members (2015), the Latin Church is the original and still major part of Western Christianity, in contrast to the Eastern Catholic churches. It is headquartered in the Vatican City, enclaved in Rome, Italy. Historically, the leadership of the Latin Church, i.e., the Holy See, has been viewed as one of the five patriarchates of the Pentarchy of early Christianity, along with the patriarchates of Patriarchate of Constantinople">Constantinople, Patriarchate of Alexandria">Alexandria, Patriarchate of Antioch">Antioch, and Patriarchate of Jerusalem">Jerusalem
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    Eastern Catholic Churches
    The Eastern Catholic Churches or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches, are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. Headed by patriarchs, metropolitans, and major archbishops, the Eastern Catholic Churches are governed in accordance with the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, although each church also has its own canons and laws on top of this, and the preservation of their own traditions is explicitly encouraged
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