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Rice
Rice
Rice
is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa
Oryza sativa
(Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima
Oryza glaberrima
(African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Food Energy
Food
Food
energy is chemical energy that animals (including humans) derive from food through the process of cellular respiration. Cellular respiration may either involve the chemical reaction of food molecules with molecular oxygen[1] (aerobic respiration) or the process of reorganizing the food molecules without additional oxygen (anaerobic respiration).Contents1 Overview 2 Nutrition
Nutrition
labels 3 Recommended daily intake 4 Energy usage in the human body 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Humans and other animals need a minimum intake of food energy to sustain their metabolism and to drive their muscles. Foods are composed chiefly of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, vitamins, and minerals. Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water represent virtually all the weight of food, with vitamins and minerals making up only a small percentage of the weight
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Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
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Batter (cooking)
Batter is thin dough that can be easily poured into a pan.[1] [2] Batter is used mainly for pancakes, light cakes, and as a coating for fried foods. The word batter comes from the French word battre which means to beat,[3] as many batters require vigorous beating or whisking in their preparation.Contents1 Methods 2 Beer
Beer
batter 3 Cuisine
Cuisine
and batters 4 References 5 External linksMethods[edit] Many batters are made by combining dry flours with liquids such as water, milk or eggs. Batters can also be made by soaking grains in water and grinding them wet. Often a leavening agent such as baking powder is included to aerate and fluff up the batter as it cooks, or the mixture may be naturally fermented for this purpose as well as to add flavour. Carbonated water
Carbonated water
or another carbonated liquid such as beer may instead be used to aerate the batter in some recipes
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Bhadriraju Krishnamurti
Bhadriraju Krishnamurti
Bhadriraju Krishnamurti
(19 June 1928 – 11 August 2012) was an Indian Dravidianist and linguist. He was born in Ongole
Ongole
(Andhra Pradesh).[1] He was Vice Chancellor of Hyderabad Central University from 1986 to 1993 and founded the Department of Linguistics at Osmania University where he served as professor from 1962 to 1986. His magnum opus The Dravidian Languages is considered a landmark volume in the study of Dravidian linguistics.[2][3][4] Krishnamurti was a student and close associate of Murray Barnson Emeneau. He got his A.M. and Ph.D
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Proto-Dravidian Language
Proto-Dravidian is the linguistic reconstruction of the common ancestor of the Dravidian languages.[1] It is thought to have differentiated into Proto-North Dravidian, Proto-Central Dravidian, and Proto-South Dravidian, although the date of diversification is still debated.[2]Contents1 History 2 Reconstructed language 3 Speakers 4 Notes 5 References 6 See also 7 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Elamo-Dravidian
Elamo-Dravidian
languages As a proto-language, the Proto-Dravidian language
Proto-Dravidian language
is not itself attested in the historical record. Its modern conception is based solely on reconstruction. It is suggested that the language was spoken in the 4th millennium BCE, and started disintegrating into various branches around 3rd millennium BCE.[3] Reconstructed language[edit] Vowels: Proto-Dravidian contrasted between five short and long vowels: *a, *ā, *i, *ī, *u, *ū, *e, *ē, *o, *ō
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Weed Control
Weed control is the botanical component of pest control, which attempts to stop weeds, especially noxious or injurious weeds, from competing with desired flora and fauna, this includes domesticated plants and livestock, and in natural settings, it includes stopping non local species competing with native, local, species, especially so in reserves and heritage areas. Weed control is important in agriculture. Many strategies have been developed in order to contain these plants
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Vermin
Vermin
Vermin
(colloquially varmint[1] or varmit) are pests or nuisance animals, that spread diseases or destroy crops or livestock. Since the term is defined in relation to human activities, which species are included vary from area to area and person to person. The term derives from the Latin
Latin
vermis (worm), and was originally used for the worm-like larvae of certain insects, many of which infest foodstuffs.[2] The term varmint (and vermint) has been found in sources from c. 1530–1540s.[1][3]Contents1 Spelling distinction 2 Scope of meanings 3 Deterioration of balance 4 Canada 5 United Kingdom 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksSpelling distinction[edit] Varmint or varmit is an American-English
American-English
colloquialism, particularly common to the American East and South-east within the nearby bordering states of the vast Appalachia
Appalachia
region
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Perennial
A perennial plant or simply perennial is a plant that lives more than two years.[1] The term (per- + -ennial, "through the years") is often used to differentiate a plant from shorter-lived annuals and biennials. The term is also widely used to distinguish plants with little or no woody growth from trees and shrubs, which are also technically perennials.[2] Perennials, especially small flowering plants, that grow and bloom over the spring and summer, die back every autumn and winter, and then return in the spring from their rootstock, are known as herbaceous perennials. However, depending on the rigors of local climate, a plant that is a perennial in its native habitat, or in a milder garden, may be treated by a gardener as an annual and planted out every year, from seed, from cuttings or from divisions
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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P. T. Srinivasa Iyengar
Pillaipundagudi Thiruvengadattaiyangar Srinivasa Iyengar (1863–1931)[citation needed] was an Indian historian, linguist and educationist who wrote books on the history of South India. Academic career[edit] Srinivasa Iyengar served as the Principal of A. V. N. College, Visakhapatnam
Visakhapatnam
during the first two decades of the twentieth century.[1] He campaigned to bring changes in the curriculum and introduce spoken dialects
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Anemophily
Anemophily
Anemophily
or wind pollination is a form of pollination whereby pollen is distributed by wind.[1] Almost all gymnosperms are anemophilous, as are many plants in the order Poales, including grasses, sedges and rushes.[1] Other common anemophilous plants are oaks, sweet chestnuts, alders and members of the family Juglandaceae
Juglandaceae
(hickory or walnut family).Contents1 Syndrome 2 Allergies 3 References 4 External linksSyndrome[edit] Features of the wind-pollination syndrome include a lack of scent production, a lack of showy floral parts (resulting in inconspicuous flowers), reduced production of nectar, and the production of enormous numbers of pollen grains.[2] This distinguishes them from entomophilous and zoophilous species (whose pollen is spread by insects and vertebrates respectively). Anemophilous pollen grains are light and non-sticky, so that they can be transported by air currents
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Ferdinand Kittel
Reverend Ferdinand Kittel
Ferdinand Kittel
(Kannada: ಫರ್ಡಿನ್ಯಾಂಡ್ ಕಿಟ್ಟೆಲ್) (7 April 1832 in Resterhafe, East Frisia
East Frisia
– 18 December 1903 in Tübingen) was a priest and indologist with the Basel Mission
Basel Mission
in south India and worked in Mangalore, Madikeri
Madikeri
and Dharwad
Dharwad
in Karnataka. His father's name is Gottfried Christian Kittel and his mother's name is Helen Hubert. He is most famous for his studies of the Kannada language and for producing a Kannada-English dictionary of about 70,000 words in 1894.[1] Many Kannada
Kannada
dictionaries existed at least since poet Ranna's 'Ranna Khanda' in 10th century. He also composed numerous Kannada
Kannada
poems.[2] He arrived in India in 1853
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Proto-Indo-Iranian Language
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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