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Resurrection Of Christ (Raphael)
The Resurrection of Christ (1499–1502), also called The Kinnaird Resurrection (after a former owner of the painting, Lord Kinnaird), is an oil painting on wood by the Italian High Renaissance master Raphael. The work is one of the earliest known paintings by the artist, executed between 1499 and 1502. It is probably a piece of an unknown predella, though it has been suggested that the painting could be one of the remaining works of the Baronci altarpiece, Raphael's first recorded commission (seriously damaged by an earthquake in 1789, fragments of which are today found in museums across Europe).[1] The painting is now in the São Paulo Museum of Art. The Kinnaird Resurrection is one of the first preserved works of Raphael in which his natural dramatic style of composition was already obvious, as opposed to the gentle poetic style of his master, Pietro Perugino
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Raphael

Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino[2] (Italian: [raffaˈɛllo ˈsantsjo da urˈbiːno]; March 28 or April 6, 1483 – April 6, 1520),[3][a] known as Raphael,[5] was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form, ease of composition, and visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur.[6] Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.[7] Raphael was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop and, despite his early death at 37, leaving a large body of work
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Firstborn (Judaism)
The firstborn or firstborn son (Hebrew בְּכוֹר bəḵōr) is an important concept in Judaism. The role of firstborn son carries significance in the redemption of the first-born son, in the allocation of a double portion of the inheritance, and in the prophetic application of "firstborn" to the nation of Israel. The semitic root B-K-R means "early" or "first" in Ancient Near East semitic languages. Classical Hebrew contains various verbs from the B-K-R stem with this association. The plural noun bikkurim (vegetable firstfruits) also derives from this root.[1] The masculine noun bekhor, firstborn, is used of sons, as "Canaan begat Sidon his firstborn" (Genesis 10:15), whereas the feminine noun, and female equivalent, is bekirah (בְּכִירָה), first-born daughter, such as Leah (Genesis 29:26)
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Calvary
Calvary, or Golgotha (Koinē Greek: Γολγοθᾶ[ς] Golgothâ[s], traditionally interpreted as reflecting Syriac: ܓܘܠܓܘܠܬܐgolgolṯā,[1][2] as it were Hebrew gulgōleṯ "skull" (גולגולת),[3][4] Arabic: جلجثة‎), was, according to the canonical Gospels, a site immediately outside Jerusalem's walls where Jesus was crucified.[5] The canonical Gospels use the Koine term Kraníon (Κρανίον)[6] when testifying to the place outside Jerusalem where Jesus was crucified. Kraníon is often translated as "Skull" in English, but more accurately means Cranium, the part of the skull enclosing the brain
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Fringe Theories
A fringe theory is an idea or viewpoint which differs from the accepted scholarship in its field. Fringe theories include the models and proposals of fringe science, as well as similar ideas in other areas of scholarship, such as the humanities. The term fringe theory is commonly used in a narrower sense as a pejorative, roughly synonymous with pseudo-scholarship. Precise definitions that distinguish between widely held viewpoints, fringe theories, and pseudo-scholarship are difficult to construct because of the demarcation problem. Issues of false balance or false equivalence can occur when fringe theories are presented as being equal to widely accepted theories. Fringe theories are ideas which depart significantly from a prevailing or mainstream theory
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Jewish Eschatology
— Events — In Judaism, the main textual source for the belief in the end of days and accompanying events is the Tanakh or Hebrew Bible. The roots of Jewish eschatology are to be found in the pre-exile prophets, including Isaiah and Jeremiah, and the exile-prophets Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah.[1] The main tenets of Jewish eschatology are the following, in no particular order, elaborated in the Books of Isaiah, Jeremiah and Ezekiel:[2]

Etymology

The Hebrew word mashiach (or moshiach) refers to the Jewish idea of the messiah. In biblical times the title mashiach was awarded to someone in a high position of nobility and greatness. For example, Cohen ha-Mašíaḥ means High Priest
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Jesus Is Lord
"Jesus is Lord" (Greek: κύριος Ἰησοῦς, kyrios Iesous) is the shortest credal affirmation found in the New Testament, one of several slightly more elaborate variations.[1] It serves as a statement of faith for the majority of Christians who regard Jesus as both fully man and God. It is the motto of the World Council of Churches. In antiquity, in general use, the term "lord" was a courtesy title for social superiors, but its root meaning was "ruler". Kings everywhere were styled "Lord" and often considered divine beings so the word acquired a religious significance.[2] When the Hebrew Bible was translated into Greek in the Septuagint at least two centuries before Christianity, Kurios was used for the divine tetragrammaton YHVH[3] which was no longer read aloud but replaced with adonai, a special form of the Hebrew adon = "lord".[4] When in 27 B.C
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Crown Of Thorns
According to the New Testament, a woven crown of thorns was placed on the head of Jesus during the events leading up to his crucifixion. It was one of the instruments of the Passion, employed by Jesus' captors both to cause him pain and to mock his claim of authority. It is mentioned in the gospels of Matthew ("And when they had plaited a crown of thorns, they put it upon his head, and a reed in his right hand: and they bowed the knee and mocked him, saying Hail, King of the Jews!" 27:29), Mark (15:17) and John (19:2, 5), and is often alluded to by the early Church Fathers, such as Clement of Alexandria, Origen and others. Since at least around the year 400, a relic believed by many to be the crown of thorns has been venerated. At the time of the Crusades, Emperor Baldwin II of Jerusalem yielded the relic to French King Louis IX
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Talpiot Tomb
The Talpiot Tomb (or Talpiyot Tomb) is a rock-cut tomb discovered in 1980 in the East Talpiot neighborhood, five kilometers (three miles) south of the Old City in East Jerusalem. It contained ten ossuaries, six inscribed with epigraphs, including one interpreted as "Yeshua bar Yehosef" ("Jeshua, son of Joseph"), though the inscription is partially illegible, and its translation and interpretation is widely disputed.[1] The tomb also yielded various human remains and several carvings. The Talpiot discovery was documented in 1994 in "Catalogue of Jewish Ossuaries in the Collections of the State of Israel" numbers 701–709, and first discussed in the media in the United Kingdom during March/April 1996.[2] Later that year an article describing the find was published in volume 29 of Atiqot, the journal of the Israel Antiquities Authority
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