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Ray Danton
Ray Danton (born Raymond Caplan; September 19, 1931 – February 11, 1992), also known as Raymond Danton, was a radio, film, stage, and television actor, director, and producer whose most famous roles were in the screen biographies The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond (1960) and The George Raft Story (1962). He was married to actress Julie Adams from 1954 to 1981.[1] Danton was born Raymond Caplan[2] in New York City, the son of Myrtle (née Menkin) and Jack Caplan.[3] His family was Jewish, and he was a descendant of the Vilna Gaon.[3] Danton entered show business as a child radio actor on NBC radio's Let's Pretend show in 1943 at age twelve.[4] He began acting on radio and stage regularly also working as an assistant stage manager.[5] In 1947, he started at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Technical School, appearing in many stage productions
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Los Angeles
Los Angeles (/lɔːs ˈænələs/ (listen);[a] Spanish: Los Ángeles; Spanish for 'The Angels'),[16] officially the City of Los Angeles and often known by its initials L.A., is the largest city in California. With an estimated population of nearly four million people,[17] it is the second-most populous city in the United States (after New York City) and the third-most populous city in North America (after Mexico City and New York City). Los Angeles is known for its Mediterranean climate, ethnic diversity, Hollywood entertainment industry, and its sprawling metropolis. Los Angeles lies in a basin in Southern California, adjacent to the Pacific Ocean, with mountains as high as 10,000 feet (3,000 m), and deserts
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Jean Lafitte
Jean Lafitte (c. 1780c. 1823) was a French pirate and privateer who operated in the Gulf of Mexico in the early 19th century. He and his older brother Pierre spelled their last name Laffite, but English language documents of the time used "Lafitte". This has become the common spelling in the United States, including places named after him.[1] Lafitte is believed to have been born either in Basque-France or the French colony of Saint-Domingue. By 1805, he was operating a warehouse in New Orleans to help disperse the goods smuggled by his brother Pierre Lafitte. The United States government passed the Embargo Act of 1807, so the Lafittes moved their operations to an island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana
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Ron Foster (actor)
Ronald R. Foster (February 19, 1930 – February 26, 2015) was an American actor. His early work included twenty-four appearances from 1957 to 1959, mostly in the role of Officer Garvey in the Broderick Crawford syndicated television series Highway Patrol. Foster also made five appearances between 1959 and 1960 on CBS's short-lived adventure series Men into Space in the role of Lieutenant Neil Templeton. He appeared three times in different roles from 1959 to 1964 on CBS's Rawhide, starring Eric Fleming and Clint Eastwood. From 1964 to 1971, he appeared five times in different roles on another western, NBC's Bonanza
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Hawaiian Eye

Hawaiian Eye is an American detective television series that ran from October 1959 to April 1963 on the ABC television network.

Private investigator Tracy Steele (Anthony Eisley) and his half-Hawaiian partner, Tom Lopaka (Robert Conrad), own Hawaiian Eye, a combination detective agency and private security firm, located in Honolulu, Hawaii. Their principal client is the Hawaiian Village Hotel, which in exchange for security services, provides the agency with a luxurious private compound on the hotel grounds
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Budd Boetticher
Oscar "Budd" Boetticher Jr. (/ˈbɛtɪkər/ BET-i-kər; July 29, 1916 – November 29, 2001) was an American film director. He is most famous for a series of low-budget Westerns he made in the late 1950s starring Randolph Scott.[1][2] Boetticher was born in Chicago. His mother died in childbirth and his father was killed in an accident shortly afterwards. He was adopted by a wealthy couple Oscar Boetticher Sr. (1867–1953) and Georgia Naas Boetticher (1888–1955) and was raised in Evansville, Indiana, along with his younger brother Henry Edward Boetticher (1924–2004). He attended Culver Military Academy where he became friends with Hal Roach Jr..[3] He was a star athlete at Ohio State University, until an injury ended his sports career
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Iron Curtain

The Iron Curtain was a political boundary dividing Europe into two separate areas from the end of World War II in 1945 until the end of the Cold War in 1991. The term symbolizes the efforts by the Soviet Union (USSR) to block itself and its satellite states from open contact with the West and its allied states. On the east side of the Iron Curtain were the countries that were connected to or influenced by the Soviet Union, while on the west side were the countries that were NATO members or nominally neutral. Separate international economic and military alliances were developed on each side of the Iron Curtain. It later became a term for the 7,000-kilometre-long (4,300 mi) physical barrier of fences, walls, minefields, and watchtowers that divided the "east" and "west"
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Studio One In Hollywood
Studio One is an American radio anthology drama series that was also adapted to television. It was created in 1947 by Canadian director Fletcher Markle, who came to CBS from the CBC. It aired under several variant titles: Studio One in Hollywood, Studio One Summer Theatre, Westinghouse Studio One and Westinghouse Summer Theatre. On April 29, 1947, Fletcher Markle launched the 60-minute CBS Radio series with an adaptation of Malcolm Lowry's Under the Volcano. Broadcast on Tuesdays, opposite Fibber McGee and Molly and The Bob Hope Show at 9:30 pm, ET, the radio series continued until July 27, 1948, showcasing such adaptations as Dodsworth, Pride and Prejudice, The Red Badge of Courage, and Ah, Wilderness
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Little Big Man
Little Big Man (Lakota: Wičháša Tȟáŋkala), or Charging Bear, was an Oglala Lakota, or Oglala Sioux, who was a fearless and respected warrior who fought under, and was distant cousin to, Crazy Horse ("His-Horse-Is-Crazy"). He opposed the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie and fought against efforts by the United States to take control of the ancestral Sioux lands in the Black Hills area of the Dakota Territory. He also fought at the Battle of Little Big Horn in the Montana Territory in 1876. Late in life he decided to cooperate with the U.S. and may have been involved in the murder of his old ally and rival, Crazy Horse, at Fort Robinson in Nebraska in 1877.[1] Little Big Man was Crazy Horse's lieutenant and threatened to kill the U.S. government commissioners negotiating with the Sioux for control of the Black Hills in the late 1860s
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