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Central Highlands (Vietnam)
Tây Nguyên, translated as Western Highlands and sometimes also called Central Highlands, is one of the regions of Vietnam
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Fermentation (food)
Fermentation in food processing is the process of converting carbohydrates to alcohol or organic acids using microorganismsyeasts or bacteria—under anaerobic conditions. Fermentation usually implies that the action of microorganisms is desired. The science of fermentation is known as zymology or zymurgy. The term fermentation sometimes refers specifically to the chemical conversion of sugars into ethanol, producing alcoholic drinks such as wine, beer, and cider. However, similar processes take place in the leavening of bread (CO2 produced by yeast activity), and in the preservation of sour foods with the production of lactic acid, such as in sauerkraut and yogurt. Other widely consumed fermented foods include vinegar, olives, and cheese
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Vietnam
Vietnam (UK: /ˌvjɛtˈnæm, -ˈnɑːm/, US: /ˌvətˈnɑːm, -ˈnæm/ (About this sound listen); Vietnamese: Việt Nam pronounced [vîət nāːm] (About this sound listen)), officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnamese: Cộng hòa xã hội chủ nghĩa Việt Nam (About this sound listen)), is the easternmost country on the Indochina Peninsula in Southeast Asia
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Tây Nguyên
Tây Nguyên, translated as Western Highlands and sometimes also called Central Highlands, is one of the regions of Vietnam
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Vung Tau
Vũng Tàu (Hanoi accent: [vuŋ˧ˀ˥ taʊ̯˨˩] (About this sound listen), Saigon accent: [vuŋ˧˩˧ taːw˨˩] (About this sound listen)) is the largest city and former capital of Bà Rịa–Vũng Tàu Province in Vietnam. The city area is 140 square kilometres (54 square miles), consists of thirteen urban wards and one commune of Long Son Islet
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Gong
A gong (from Malay: gong; Chinese: ; pinyin: luó; Japanese: , translit. ra; Khmer: គង - Kong; Thai: ฆ้อง Khong; Vietnamese: cồng chiêng) is an East and Southeast Asian musical percussion instrument that takes the form of a flat, circular metal disc which is hit with a mallet. The gong traces its roots back to the Bronze Age around 3500 BC
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Kuchikamizake
Kuchikamizake (口噛み酒, " "mouth-chewed sake") is a kind of rice-based alcohol produced by a process involving human saliva as a fermentation starter. Kuchikamizake was one type of the earliest sake. Kuchi means "mouth", kami means "chew" and zake is the rendaku form of "sake"
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Sake
Sake (Japanese: , Japanese pronunciation: [Sake]), also spelled saké, (IPA: /ˈsɑːk/ SAH-kay or American English /ˈsɑːki/ SAH-kee) also referred to as a Japanese rice wine, is an alcoholic beverage made by fermenting rice that has been polished to remove the bran. Unlike wine, in which alcohol is produced by fermenting sugar that is naturally present in fruit, typically grapes, sake is produced by a brewing process more akin to that of beer, where starch is converted into sugars which ferment into alcohol. The brewing process for sake differs from the process for beer in that, for beer, the conversion from starch to sugar and from sugar to alcohol occurs in two distinct steps. Like other rice wines, when sake is brewed, these conversions occur simultaneously. Furthermore, the alcohol content differs between sake, wine, and beer
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Sato (beverage)
Sato (Thai: สาโท, pronounced [sǎː.tʰoː], RTGSsatho) is a traditional northeastern Thailand (Isan) beer style that has been made for centuries from starchy glutinous or sticky rice by growers in that region. Just as other regional varieties made not from grapes but cereal are commonly called wine rather than beer, sato is commonly called Thai rice wine
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Mijiu
Mijiu (Chinese: 米酒; pinyin: mǐjiǔ; Wade–Giles: mi-chiu; literally: "rice wine") is a Chinese rice wine made from glutinous rice. As a fermented beverage, it is categorized as a form of huangjiu. It generally looks clear and tastes somewhat sweet, similar to its Japanese counterpart sake. The alcohol content ranges between 12% and 20%. Rice wine was made around or before 1000 BC by ancient Chinese and then the practice spread to Japan and other countries. Since then, it has played an important role in Chinese life. In most Chinese supermarkets there are various kinds of rice wines. It is a traditional beverage to the Chinese and some of the families still follow the custom of making rice wine by themselves. The rice wine is made using sticky rice, Chinese yeast and water
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Raksi
Raksi (Limbu:Sijongwaa aara) (Nepali: रक्सी) or Rakshi is a traditional distilled alcoholic beverage in Nepal and Tibet. It is often made at home.
Raksi distillery in Nepal
It is also the traditional beverage of Limbu people. The Limbus especially, drink an enormous amount of Tongba and raksi served with pieces of Pork, Water buffalo or Goat meat Sekuwa. Raksi is usually made from kodo millet (kodo) or rice; different grains produce different flavors. It is a strong drink, clear like vodka or gin, tasting somewhat like Japanese sake. In the CNN's list of World's 50 most delicious drinks, it was ranked 41st and was described as "Made from millet or rice, Raksi is strong on the nose and sends a burning sensation straight down your throat that resolves itself into a surprisingly smooth, velvety sensation
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