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Quaternary Glaciation
The Quaternary glaciation, also known as the Pleistocene glaciation, is an alternating series of glacial and interglacial periods during the Quaternary period that began 2.58 Ma (million years ago), and is ongoing.[1][2][3] Although geologists describe the entire time period as an "ice age", in popular culture the term "ice age" is usually associated with just the most recent glacial period during the Pleistocene.[4] Since planet Earth still has ice sheets, geologists consider the Quaternary glaciation to be ongoing, with the Earth now experiencing an interglacial period. During the Quaternary glaciation, ice sheets appeared. During glacial periods they expanded, and during interglacial periods they contracted. Since the end of the last glacial period, the only surviving ice sheets are the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets
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Vostok Station

Vostok Station (Russian: ста́нция Восто́к, romanizedstántsiya Vostók, pronounced [ˈstant͡sɨjə vɐˈstok], meaning "Station Vostók") is a Russian research station in inland Princess Elizabeth Land, Antarctica. Founded by the Soviet Union in 1957, the station lies at the southern Pole of Cold, with the lowest reliably measured natural temperature on Earth of −89.2 °C (−128.6 °F; 184.0 K).[2] Research includes ice core drilling and magnetometry. Vostok (Russian for "east") was named after Vostok, the lead ship of the First Russian Antarctic Expedition captained by Fabian von Bellingshausen. The Bellingshausen Station was named after this captain
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Drumlin
A drumlin, from the Irish word droimnín ("littlest ridge"), first recorded in 1833, in the classical sense is an elongated hill in the shape of an inverted spoon or half-buried egg[1] formed by glacial ice acting on underlying unconsolidated till or ground moraine. Clusters of drumlins create a landscape which is often described as having a 'basket of eggs topography'.[2] Drumlins occur in various shapes and sizes,[3] including symmetrical (about the long axis), spindle, parabolic forms, and transverse asymmetrical forms; their long axis is parallel to the direction of movement of the formative flow at the time of formation.[4] Drumlins are typically 1 to 2 km (0.6–1.2 mi) long, less than 50 m (160 ft) high and between 300 to 600 metres (1,000–2,000 ft) wide. Drumlins generally have a length:width ratio of between 1:2 and 1:3.5,[
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Ice Sheet
An ice sheet, also known as a continental glacier,[1] is a mass of glacial ice that covers surrounding terrain and is greater than 50,000 km2 (19,000 sq mi).[2] The only current ice sheets are in Antarctica and Greenland; during the last glacial period at Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) the Laurentide Ice Sheet covered much of North America, the Weichselian ice sheet covered northern Europe and the Patagonian Ice Sheet covered southern South America. Ice sheets are bigger than ice shelves or alpine glaciers. Masses of ice covering less than 50,000 km2 are termed an ice cap
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Andean-Saharan
The Andean-Saharan glaciation occurred during the Paleozoic from 450 Ma to 420 Ma, during the late Ordovician and the Silurian period. For the Ordovician/Saharan part, see the more extensive article on the Late Ordovician glaciation. According to Eyles and Young, "A major glacial episode at c. 440 Ma, is recorded in Late Ordovician strata (predominantly Ashgillian) in West Africa (Tamadjert Formation of the Sahara), in Morocco (Tindouf Basin) and in west-central Saudi Arabia, all areas at polar latitudes at the time
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