HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Predeterminism
Predeterminism is the idea that all events are determined in advance.[1][2] Predeterminism is the philosophy that all events of history, past, present and future, have been already decided or are already known (by God, fate, or some other force), including human actions. Predeterminism is closely related to determinism.[3] The concept of predeterminism is often argued by invoking causal determinism, implying that there is an unbroken chain of prior occurrences stretching back to the origin of the universe. In the case of predeterminism, this chain of events has been pre-established, and human actions cannot interfere with the outcomes of this pre-established chain
[...More...]

"Predeterminism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

ArXiv
arXiv (pronounced "archive")[2] is a repository of electronic preprints (known as e-prints) approved for publication after moderation, that consists of scientific papers in the fields of mathematics, physics, astronomy, computer science, quantitative biology, statistics, and quantitative finance, which can be accessed online. In many fields of mathematics and physics, almost all scientific papers are self-archived on the arXiv repository. Begun on August 14, 1991, arXiv.org passed the half-million article milestone on October 3, 2008,[3][4] and hit a million by the end of 2014.[5][6] By October 2016 the submission rate had grown to more than 10,000 per month.[6][7]Contents1 History 2 Peer review 3 Submission formats 4 Access 5 Copyright status of files 6 Controversy 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]A screenshot of the arXiv taken in 1994,[8] using the browser NCSA Mosaic
[...More...]

"ArXiv" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

F. H. Bradley
Francis Herbert Bradley OM (30 January 1846 – 18 September 1924) was a British idealist
British idealist
philosopher. His most important work was Appearance and Reality (1893).[3]Contents1 Life 2 Philosophy 3 Moral philosophy 4 Legacy 5 Books and publications 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Bradley was born at Clapham, Surrey, England
England
(now part of the Greater London area). He was the child of Charles Bradley, an evangelical preacher, and Emma Linton, Charles's second wife. A. C. Bradley
A. C. Bradley
was his brother. Educated at Cheltenham College
Cheltenham College
and Marlborough College, he read, as a teenager, some of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. In 1865, he entered University College, Oxford. In 1870, he was elected to a fellowship at Oxford's Merton College where he remained until his death in 1924
[...More...]

"F. H. Bradley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
[...More...]

"Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

William James
William James
William James
(January 11, 1842 – August 26, 1910) was an American philosopher and psychologist, and the first educator to offer a psychology course in the United States. [3] James was one of the leading thinkers of the late nineteenth century and is believed by many to be one of the most influential philosophers the United States has ever produced, while others have labeled him the "Father of American psychology".[4][5][6] Along with Charles Sanders Peirce
Charles Sanders Peirce
and John Dewey, James is considered to be one of the major figures associated with the philosophical school known as pragmatism, and is also cited as one of the founders of functional psychology. A Review of General Psychology
Psychology
analysis, published in 2002, ranked James as the 14th most eminent psychologist of the 20th century.[7] He also developed the philosophical perspective known as radical empiricism
[...More...]

"William James" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compatibilism
Compatibilism
Compatibilism
is the belief that free will and determinism are mutually compatible and that it is possible to believe in both without being logically inconsistent.[1] Compatibilists believe freedom can be present or absent in situations for reasons that have nothing to do with metaphysics.[2] They define free will as freedom to act according to one's motives without arbitrary hindrance from other individuals or institutions.[citation needed] For example, courts of law make judgments, without bringing in metaphysics, about whether an individual was acting of their own free will in specific circumstances. It is assumed in a court of law that someone could have acted otherwise than in reality
[...More...]

"Compatibilism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes
(/hɒbz/; 5 April 1588 – 4 December 1679), in some older texts Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes
of Malmesbury,[2] was an English philosopher who is considered one of the founders of modern political philosophy.[3][4] Hobbes is
[...More...]

"Thomas Hobbes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

David Hume
David Hume
David Hume
(/hjuːm/; born David Home; 7 May 1711 NS (26 April 1711 OS) – 25 August 1776) was a Scottish philosopher, historian, economist, and essayist, who is best known today for his highly influential system of philosophical empiricism, skepticism, and naturalism. Hume's empiricist approach to philosophy places him with John Locke, Francis Bacon
Francis Bacon
and Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes
as a British Empiricist.[3] Beginning with his A Treatise of Human Nature
A Treatise of Human Nature
(1739), Hume strove to create a total naturalistic science of man that examined the psychological basis of human nature. Against philosophical rationalists, Hume held that passion rather than reason governs human behaviour
[...More...]

"David Hume" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
(20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873) was a British philosopher, political economist and civil servant. One of the most influential thinkers in the history of liberalism, he contributed widely to social theory, political theory and political economy. Dubbed "the most influential English-speaking philosopher of the nineteenth century",[6] Mill's conception of liberty justified the freedom of the individual in opposition to unlimited state and social control.[7] Mill was a proponent of utilitarianism, an ethical theory developed by his predecessor Jeremy Bentham
[...More...]

"John Stuart Mill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henry Sidgwick
Henry Sidgwick
Henry Sidgwick
(/ˈsɪdʒwɪk/; 31 May 1838 – 28 August 1900) was an English utilitarian philosopher and economist;[1] he held the Knightbridge Professor of Moral Philosophy from the year 1883 until his death.[2] He was one of the founders and first president of the Society for Psychical Research
Society for Psychical Research
and a member of the Metaphysical Society and promoted the higher education of women. His work in economics has also had a lasting influence. He also founded Newnham College
Newnham College
in 1875, a women-only constituent college of the University of Cambridge. It was the second Cambridge college to admit women after Girton College
[...More...]

"Henry Sidgwick" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Randomness
Randomness
Randomness
is the lack of pattern or predictability in events.[1] A random sequence of events, symbols or steps has no order and does not follow an intelligible pattern or combination. Individual random events are by definition unpredictable, but in many cases the frequency of different outcomes over a large number of events (or "trials") is predictable. For example, when throwing two dice, the outcome of any particular roll is unpredictable, but a sum of 7 will occur twice as often as 4. In this view, randomness is a measure of uncertainty of an outcome, rather than haphazardness, and applies to concepts of chance, probability, and information entropy. The fields of mathematics, probability, and statistics use formal definitions of randomness. In statistics, a random variable is an assignment of a numerical value to each possible outcome of an event space
[...More...]

"Randomness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
[...More...]

"Christian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quantum Mechanics
Quantum mechanics (QM; also known as quantum physics or quantum theory), including quantum field theory, is a fundamental theory in physics which describes nature at the smallest scales of energy levels of atoms and subatomic particles.[2] Classical physics
Classical physics
(the physics existing before quantum mechanics) is a set of fundamental theories which describes nature at ordinary (macroscopic) scale
[...More...]

"Quantum Mechanics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Indeterminacy Principle
In quantum mechanics, the uncertainty principle (also known as Heisenberg's uncertainty principle) is any of a variety of mathematical inequalities[1] asserting a fundamental limit to the precision with which certain pairs of physical properties of a particle, known as complementary variables, such as position x and momentum p, can be known. Introduced first in 1927, by the German physicist Werner Heisenberg, it states that the more precisely the position of some particle is determined, the less precisely its momentum can be known, and vice versa.[2] The formal inequality relating the standard deviation of position σx and the standard deviation of momentum σp was derived by Earle Hesse Kennard[3] later that year and by Hermann Weyl[4] in 1928: σ x σ p ≥ ℏ 2     displaystyle sigma _ x sigma _ p geq frac
[...More...]

"Indeterminacy Principle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Epicurus
Epicurus
Epicurus
(/ˌɛpɪˈkjʊərəs, ˌɛpɪˈkjɔːrəs/;[2] Greek: Ἐπίκουρος, Epíkouros, "ally, comrade"; 341–270 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher who founded a school of philosophy now called Epicureanism. Only a few fragments and letters of Epicurus's 300 written works remain. Much of what is known about Epicurean philosophy derives from later followers and commentators. For Epicurus, the purpose of philosophy was to attain the happy, tranquil life, characterized by ataraxia—peace and freedom from fear—and aponia—the absence of pain—and by living a self-sufficient life surrounded by friends. He taught that the root of all human neurosis was death denial, and the tendency for human beings to assume that death will be horrific and painful, which he claimed causes unnecessary anxiety, selfish self-protective behaviors, and hypocrisy
[...More...]

"Epicurus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philippa Foot
Philippa Ruth Foot, FBA (/ˈfɪlɪpə ˈfʊt/; née Bosanquet; 3 October 1920 – 3 October 2010) was a British philosopher, most notable for her works in ethics. She was one of the founders of contemporary virtue ethics, inspired by the ethics of Aristotle. Her later career marked a significant change in view from her work in the 1950s and 1960s, and may be seen as an attempt to modernize Aristotelian ethical theory, to show that it is adaptable to a contemporary world view, and thus, that it could compete with such popular theories as modern deontological and utilitarian ethics. Some of her work was crucial in the re-emergence of normative ethics within analytic philosophy, especially her critique of consequentialism and of non-cognitivism. A familiar example is the continuing discussion of an example of hers referred to as the trolley problem. Foot's approach was influenced by the later work of Wittgenstein, although she rarely dealt explicitly with materials treated by him
[...More...]

"Philippa Foot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.