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Pirot
Pirot
Pirot
(Serbian Cyrillic: Пирот) is a city and the administrative center of the Pirot District
Pirot District
in southeastern Serbia. According to 2011 census, the urban area of the city has a population of 38,785, while the population of the city administrative area has 57,928 inhabitants. The city has a rich geographical features, including the mountains of Stara Planina, Vlaška Planina, Belava, Suva Planina; rivers which flow through the town, including Nišava, Jerma, Rasnička Reka, Temštica and the Visočica; and four lakes, the Zavoj Lake, Berovacko Lake, Krupac Lake and Sukovo
Sukovo
Lake. It also has a rich culture, with notable Orthodox church buildings, including the Church of St. Petka, and the monastery of St. Georges and St. John the Theologian from the late 14th century, both of which display a fine example of medieval Serbian architecture
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Austro-Turkish War (1737–39)
 Ottoman Empire Principality of Wallachia Principality of Moldova Crimean KhanateCommanders and leadersWallachian Ruler - Constantin Mavrocordat Moldovian Ruler - Grigore GhicaUnits involvedSerbian Militiav t eRusso-Austro-Turkish War (1735–39)Azov Bender Ochakov Banja Luka Grocka Belgrade Stavuchanyv t eRusso-Ottoman Wars1568–70 1676–81 1686–1700 1710–11 1735–39 1768–74 1787–92 1806–12 1828–29 1853–56 1877–78 1914–18Russo-Crimean WarsThe Russo-Turkish War of 1735–1739 between Russia
Russia
and the Ottoman Empire was caused by the Ottoman Empire's war with Persia and continuing raids by the Crimean Tatars.[1] The war also represented Russia's continuing struggle for access to the Black Sea
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Basil II
Basil II (Greek: Βασίλειος Β΄, Basileios II; 958 – 15 December 1025) was a Byzantine Emperor
Byzantine Emperor
from the Macedonian dynasty who reigned from 10 January 976 to 15 December 1025. He was known in his time as Basil the Porphyrogenitus
Porphyrogenitus
and Basil the Young to distinguish him from his supposed ancestor, Basil I the Macedonian. He was the second longest reigning emperor after his brother Constantine VIII
Constantine VIII
whom he named co-emperor in 962, but outlived him by 3 years. The early years of his long reign were dominated by civil war against powerful generals from the Anatolian aristocracy. Following their submission, Basil oversaw the stabilization and expansion of the eastern frontier of the Byzantine Empire, and above all, the final and complete subjugation of Bulgaria, the Empire's foremost European foe, after a prolonged struggle
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Dacia Mediterranea
Dacia Mediterranea
Dacia Mediterranea
(Midland Dacia) was a late Roman province, split off from the former Dacia Aureliana
Dacia Aureliana
by
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Procopius Of Caesarea
Procopius
Procopius
of Caesarea
Caesarea
(Greek: Προκόπιος ὁ Καισαρεύς Prokopios ho Kaisareus, Latin: Procopius Caesariensis; c. 500 – c. 554 AD) was a prominent late antique Greek scholar from Palaestina Prima.[1] Accompanying the Byzantine chief-general Belisarius
Belisarius
in the wars of the Emperor Justinian, he became the principal Greek-Byzantine historian of the 6th century, writing the Wars (or Histories), the Buildings of Justinian and the now-celebrated (and infamous) Secret History
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Justinian I
Justinian I
Justinian I
(/dʒʌˈstɪniən/; Latin: Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Iustinianus Augustus; Greek: Φλάβιος Πέτρος Σαββάτιος Ἰουστινιανός Flávios Pétros Sabbátios Ioustinianós; c. 482 – 14 November 565), traditionally known as Justinian the Great and also Saint
Saint
Justinian the Great in the Eastern Orthodox Church,[3][4] was the Eastern Roman emperor from 527 to 565. During his reign, Justinian sought to revive the empire's greatness and reconquer the lost western half of the historical Roman Empire
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Sofia
Sofia
Sofia
(/ˈsoʊfiə, ˈsɒf-, soʊˈfiːə/ SOH-fee-ə, SOF-, soh-FEE-ə;[13][14] Bulgarian: Со́фия, tr. Sofiya,[15][16] pronounced [ˈsɔfijə] ( listen)) is the capital and largest city of Bulgaria. 1.3 million people live in the city and 1.7 million people live in its metropolitan area.[12] The city is at the foot of Vitosha
Vitosha
Mountain in the western part of the country
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Thermae
In ancient Rome, thermae (from Greek θερμός thermos, "hot") and balneae (from Greek βαλανεῖον balaneion) were facilities for bathing. Thermae
Thermae
usually refers to the large imperial bath complexes, while balneae were smaller-scale facilities, public or private, that existed in great numbers throughout Rome.[1] Most Roman cities had at least one, if not many, such buildings, which were centres not only for bathing, but socializing. Roman bath-houses were also provided for private villas, town houses, and forts. They were supplied with water from an adjacent river or stream, or more normally, by an aqueduct. The water would be heated by a log fire before being channelled into the hot bathing rooms
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Necropolis
A necropolis (pl. necropoleis) is a large, designed cemetery with elaborate tomb monuments. The name stems from the Ancient Greek νεκρόπολις nekropolis, literally meaning "city of the dead". The term usually implies a separate burial site at a distance from a city, as opposed to tombs within cities, which were common in various places and periods of history. They are different from grave fields, which did not have remains above the ground. While the word is most commonly used for ancient sites, the name was revived in the early 19th century and applied to planned city cemeteries, such as the Glasgow Necropolis. History[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Vicus
In Ancient Rome, the vicus (plural vici) was a neighborhood or settlement. During the Republican era, the four regiones of the city of Rome were subdivided into vici. In the 1st century BC, Augustus reorganized the city for administrative purposes into 14 regions, comprising 265 vici.[1] Each vicus had its own board of officials who oversaw local matters. These administrative divisions are recorded as still in effect at least through the mid-4th century.[2][3] The Latin
Latin
word vicus was also applied to the smallest administrative unit of a provincial town within the Roman Empire, and to an ad hoc provincial civilian settlement that sprang up close to and because of a nearby official Roman site, usually a military garrison or state-owned mining operation.Contents1 Local government in Rome 2 Ad hoc settlements 3 Modern placenames 4 See also 5 ReferencesLocal government in Rome[edit] See also: 14 regions of Augustan RomeThis section needs expansion
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Danube
The Danube
Danube
or Donau (/ˈdænjuːb/ DAN-yoob, known by various names in other languages) is Europe's second longest river, after the Volga. It is located in Central and Eastern Europe. The Danube
Danube
was once a long-standing frontier of the Roman Empire, and today flows through 10 countries, more than any other river in the world. Originating in Germany, the Danube
Danube
flows southeast for 2,860 km (1,780 mi), passing through or touching the border of Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova
Moldova
and Ukraine
Ukraine
before emptying into the Black Sea. Its drainage basin extends into nine more countries
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Bulgars
The Bulgars
Bulgars
(also Bulghars, Bulgari, Bolgars, Bolghars, Bolgari,[1] pre-Bulgarians, Proto-Bulgarians[2]) were Turkic semi-nomadic warrior tribes that flourished in the Pontic-Caspian steppe
Pontic-Caspian steppe
and the Volga region during the 7th century. Emerging as nomadic equestrians in the Volga-Ural region, according to some researchers their roots can be traced to Central Asia.[3] During their westward migration across the Eurasian steppe
Eurasian steppe
the Bulgars
Bulgars
absorbed other ethnic groups and cultural influences, including Hunnic and Indo-European peoples.[4][5][6][7][8][9] Modern genetic research on Central Asian Turkic people
Turkic people
and ethnic groups related to the Bulgars
Bulgars
points to an affiliation with Western Eurasian populations.[9][10][11] The Bulgars spoke a Turkic language, i.e
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Manuel I Komnenos
Manuel I Komnenos
Komnenos
(or Comnenus; Greek: Μανουήλ Α' Κομνηνός, Manouēl I Komnēnos; 28 November 1118 – 24 September 1180) was a Byzantine Emperor of the 12th century who reigned over a crucial turning point in the history of Byzantium and the Mediterranean. His reign saw the last flowering of the Komnenian restoration, during which the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
had seen a resurgence of its military and economic power, and had enjoyed a cultural revival. Eager to restore his empire to its past glories as the superpower of the Mediterranean world, Manuel pursued an energetic and ambitious foreign policy. In the process he made alliances with the Pope and the resurgent West. He invaded the Norman Kingdom of Sicily, although unsuccessfully, being the last Eastern Roman Emperor to attempt reconquests in the western Mediterranean
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Upper Moesia
Moesia
Moesia
(/ˈmiːʃə, -siə, -ʒə/;[1][2] Latin: Moesia; Greek: Μοισία, Moisía)[3] was an ancient region and later Roman province situated in the Balkans, along the south bank of the Danube River
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Stefan Nemanja
Stefan Nemanja
Stefan Nemanja
(Serbian Cyrillic: Стефан Немања, pronounced [stêfaːn ně̞maɲa]; ca 1113 – 13 February 1199) was the Grand Prince
Grand Prince
(Veliki Župan) of the Serbian Grand Principality (also known as Rascia) from 1166 to 1196
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Lazar Of Serbia
Prince Lazar Hrebeljanović (Serbian Cyrillic: Лазар Хребељановић; ca. 1329 – 15 June 1389) was a medieval Serbian ruler who created the largest and most powerful state on the territory of the disintegrated Serbian Empire. Lazar's state, referred to by historians as Moravian Serbia, comprised the basins of the Great Morava, West Morava, and South Morava
South Morava
rivers. Lazar ruled Moravian Serbia
Moravian Serbia
from 1373 until his death in 1389. He sought to resurrect the Serbian Empire
Serbian Empire
and place himself at its helm, claiming to be the direct successor of the Nemanjić dynasty, which went extinct in 1371 after ruling over Serbia for two centuries
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