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Physics
Physics
Physics
(from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis "nature"[1][2][3]) is the natural science that studies matter[4] and its motion and behavior through space and time and that studies the related entities of energy and force.[5] Physics
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Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
is a historical region in West Asia
West Asia
situated within the Tigris– Euphrates
Euphrates
river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran– Iraq
Iraq
borders.[1] The Sumerians and Akkadians
Akkadians
(including Assyrians and Babylonians) dominated Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the beginning of written history (c. 3100 BC) to the fall of Babylon
Babylon
in 539 BC, when it was conquered by the Achaemenid Empire
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Sumer
Sumer
Sumer
(/ˈsuːmər/)[note 1] is the earliest known civilization in the historical region of southern Mesopotamia, modern-day southern Iraq, during the Chalcolithic
Chalcolithic
and Early Bronze
Bronze
ages, and arguably the first civilization in the world with Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
and the Indus Valley.[1] Living along the valleys of the Tigris
Tigris
and Euphrates, Sumerian farmers were able to grow an abundance of grain and other crops, the surplus of which enabled them to settle in one place. Proto-writing
Proto-writing
in the prehistory dates back to c. 3000 BC
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Domestic Appliance
A major appliance, or domestic appliance, is a large machine in home appliance used for routine housekeeping tasks such as cooking, washing laundry, or food preservation. An appliance is different from a plumbing fixture because it uses electricity or fuel. Major appliances differ from small appliances because they are bigger and not portable. They are often considered fixtures and part of real estate and as such they are often supplied to tenants as part of otherwise unfurnished rental properties. Major appliances may have special electrical connections, connections to gas supplies, or special plumbing and ventilation arrangements that may be permanently connected to the appliance. This limits where they can be placed in a home. Many major appliances are made of enamel-coated sheet steel which, in the middle 20th century, was usually white
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Research
Research
Research
comprises "creative and systematic work undertaken to increase the stock of knowledge, including knowledge of humans, culture and society, and the use of this stock of knowledge to devise new applications."[1] It is used to establish or confirm facts, reaffirm the results of previous work, solve new or existing problems, support theorems, or develop new theories. A research project may also be an expansion on past work in the field. Research
Research
projects can be used to develop further knowledge on a topic, or in the example of a school research project, they can be used to further a student's research prowess to prepare them for future jobs or reports. To test the validity of instruments, procedures, or experiments, research may replicate elements of prior projects or the project as a whole
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Industrialization
Industrialisation
Industrialisation
or industrialization is the period of social and economic change that transforms a human group from an agrarian society into an industrial society, involving the extensive re-organisation of an economy for the purpose of manufacturing.[2] As industrial workers' incomes rise, markets for consumer goods and services of all kinds tend to expand and provide a further stimulus to industrial investment and economic growth.Contents1 Background 2 Social consequences2.1 Urbanisation2.1.1 Exploitation2.2 Changes in family structure3 Current situation 4 See also 5 References 6 F
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Biology
Biology
Biology
is the natural science that involves the study of life and living organisms, including their physical structure, chemical composition, function, development and evolution.[1] Modern biology is a vast field, composed of many branches. Despite the broad scope and the complexity of the science, there are certain unifying concepts that consolidate it into a single, coherent field. Biology
Biology
recognizes the cell as the basic unit of life, genes as the basic unit of heredity, and evolution as the engine that propels the creation of new species. Living organisms are open systems that survive by transforming energy and decreasing their local entropy[2] to maintain a stable and vital condition defined as homeostasis
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Egyptian Astronomy
Egyptian astronomy
Egyptian astronomy
begins in prehistoric times, in the Predynastic Period. In the 5th millennium BCE, the stone circles at Nabta Playa may have made use of astronomical alignments. By the time the historical Dynastic Period began in the 3rd millennium BCE, the 365-day period of the Egyptian calendar
Egyptian calendar
was already in use, and the observation of stars was important in determining the annual flooding of the Nile. The Egyptian pyramids
Egyptian pyramids
were carefully aligned towards the pole star, and the temple of Amun-Re
Amun-Re
at Karnak
Karnak
was aligned on the rising of the midwinter sun
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Astronomical Ceiling Of Senemut Tomb
Astronomical ceiling decoration in its earliest form can be traced to the Tomb of Senenmut
Senenmut
(Theban tomb no. 353), located at the site of Deir el-Bahri, Egypt. The tomb and the ceiling decorations date back to the 18th Dynasty of ancient Egypt (ca. 1473 B.C.).Contents1 Discovery 2 Celestial Diagram 3 Significance 4 External links 5 Notes and referencesDiscovery[edit] The tomb of Senemut
Senemut
was discovered during the 1925-1927 excavations directed by Herbert Winlock for the Egyptian Expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.[2] The unearthing of the 10x12 ft
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Society
A society is a group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction, or a large social group sharing the same geographical or social territory, typically subject to the same political authority and dominant cultural expectations. Societies are characterized by patterns of relationships (social relations) between individuals who share a distinctive culture and institutions; a given society may be described as the sum total of such relationships among its constituent of members. In the social sciences, a larger society often evinces stratification or dominance patterns in subgroups. Insofar as it is collaborative, a society can enable its members to benefit in ways that would not otherwise be possible on an individual basis; both individual and social (common) benefits can thus be distinguished, or in many cases found to overlap. A society can also consist of like-minded people governed by their own norms and values within a dominant, larger society
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Eighteenth Dynasty Of Egypt
The Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt
Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt
(notated Dynasty XVIII, alternatively 18th Dynasty or Dynasty 18) is classified as the first Dynasty of the Ancient Egyptian New Kingdom
New Kingdom
period, lasting from 1549/1550 BC to 1292 BC. It boasts several of Egypt's most famous pharaohs, including Tutankhamun, whose tomb was found by Howard Carter
Howard Carter
in 1922. This dynasty is also known as the Thutmosid
Thutmosid
Dynasty for the four pharaohs named Thutmose. Famous pharaohs of Dynasty XVIII include Hatshepsut
Hatshepsut
(c. 1479 BC–1458 BC), longest-reigning woman-pharaoh of an indigenous dynasty, and Akhenaten
Akhenaten
(c
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Ancient Egypt
Ancient Egypt
Egypt
was a civilization of ancient Northeastern Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile
Nile
River in the place that is now the country Egypt
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Indus Valley Civilization
The Indus Valley Civilisation
Indus Valley Civilisation
(IVC), or Harappan Civilisation,[1] was a Bronze Age
Bronze Age
civilisation (3300–1300 BCE; mature period 2600–1900 BCE) m
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Asger Aaboe
Ansgar
Ansgar
(Latinized Ansgarius; Old Norse Ásgeirr) is a Germanic given name, composed of the elements ans "god", and gar "spear".[1] Saint Ansgar, (801 – 865) was an archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen, active in the Christianization of Scandinavia. His feast day is 3 February. Ansgar
Ansgar
is the Old High German
Old High German
form of the name. The form Asger was in use in Denmark in the medieval period.[2] The Old English cognate of the name is Ōsgār (the given name Oscar is however etymologically unrelated, being of Irish origin). Modern variants of the name include Norwegian Asgeir, Icelandic Ásgeir, Danish Asger, Eske, Esge, Asgar, Asker.Contents1 List of people1.1 Medieval 1.2 Modern2 See also 3 ReferencesList of people[edit] Notable people with the given name: Medieval[edit]Saint Ansgar, (801 – 865), Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen Anscar I of Ivrea, (d
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Western World
The Western world, or simply the West (from Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
root wes-; Ancient Greek: Ἓσπερος /ˈhɛspərʊs/, Hesperos,[1] "towards evening") refers to various nations depending on the context, most often including at least part of Europe. There are many accepted definitions, all closely interrelated.[2] The Western world
Western world
is also known as the Occident (from Latin
Latin
word occidens, "sunset, West"). The East and the Orient
Orient
are terms used as contraries. Ancient Greece[a][b] and ancient Rome[c] are generally considered to be the birthplaces of Western civilization, the former due to its impact on Western philosophy, democracy, science, art, and the ancient Roman culture, the latter due to its influence in governance, republicanism, law, architecture and warfare
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Literal Translation
Literal translation, direct translation, or word-for-word translation is the rendering of text from one language to another one word at a time (Latin: "verbum pro verbo") with or without conveying the sense of the original whole. In translation studies, "literal translation" denotes technical translation of scientific, technical, technological or legal texts.[1] In translation theory, another term for "literal translation" is "metaphrase"; and for phrasal ("sense") translation — "paraphrase." When considered a bad practice of conveying word by word (lexeme to lexeme, or morpheme to lexeme) translation of non-technical type literal translations has the meaning of mistranslating idioms,[2] for example, or in the context of translating an analytic language to a synthetic language, it renders even the grammar unintelligible. The concept of literal translation may be viewed as an oxymoron (contradiction in terms), given that literal denotes something existing without interpretation, where
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