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Nur Ahmed Aman
Sultan Nur Ahmed Aman (Somali: Suldaan Nuur Axmed Amaan; (1841–1907); Somali nickname Nuur Dheere[1]), was the tribal chief sultan of the Habar Yoonis (Habr Yunis) clan from 1880–1899 and later one of the leaders behind the Somali Dervish movement and revolt (1899–1920).[2] He was the principal agitator rallying the followers of the Kob Fardod Tariqa behind his anti-French Roman Catholic Mission campaign that would become the cause of the Dervish uprising.[3] He assisted in assembling men and arms and hosted the revolting tribesmen in his quarter at Burao in August 1899, declaring the Dervish rebellion. He fought and led the war throughout the years 1899–1904
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Reginald Wingate

General Sir Francis Reginald Wingate, 1st Baronet, GCB, GCVO, GBE, KCMG, DSO, DL, TD (25 June 1861 – 29 January 1953) was a British general and administrator in Egypt and the Sudan. He earned the nom de guerre Wingate of the Sudan.

Wingate was born at Port Glasgow, Renfrewshire (now Inverclyde), the seventh son of Andrew Wingate, a textile merchant of Glasgow, and Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Turner of Dublin
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Harry Edward Spiller Cordeaux
Sir Harry Edward Spiller Cordeaux KCMG CB (15 November 1870 – 2 July 1943) was a British army officer and colonial administrator who became in turn Governor of Uganda, Saint Helena and the Bahamas. Cordeaux was born on 15 November 1870 in Poona, India. His father Edward Cordeaux was a judge in Bombay. He was educated at Brighton College and Cheltenham College. In 1888 he won a scholarship to St. John's College, Cambridge, graduating with a B.A
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Percy Cox

Major-General Sir Percy Zachariah Cox GCMG GCIE KCSI KBE DL (20 November 1864 – 20 February 1937) was a British Indian Army officer and Colonial Office administrator in the Middle East
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Buhoodle
Buhoodle (Somali: Buuhoodle, Arabic: بووهودل‎), also known as Bohotle, is a city in the Togdheer region of Somaliland. It is a prominent border town for movements of goods to and from Somaliland and the Somali region of Ethiopia. The surrounding district is rich in both livestock and fledgeling agriculture. It has primary schools, secondary schools and universities. Buhoodle is a medium-sized city that has clinics, hospitals, electricity and all the amenities required of a city. It is notable for being the birthplace of the father of the Somali nation, Mohammed Abdullah Hassan, (Mad Mullah).[2]The city is currently controlled by Khaatumo state
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John Gough (VC)
Sir John Edmond Gough VC, KCB, CMG (25 October 1871 – 22 February 1915), was an early 20th century British Army General, and a recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. Gough, known as "Johnnie", was the son of General Sir Charles Gough, and nephew of General Sir Hugh Gough, both of whom won Victoria Crosses during the Indian Mutiny in 1857. This gave the family the rare distinction of holding the VC simultaneously by father, brother and (father's) son
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Charles Egerton (Indian Army Officer)

Born the third son of Major-General Caledon Egerton and Margaret Egerton (née Cumming) and educated at Rossall School and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, Egerton was commissioned into the 31st Regiment of Foot on 9 June 1867.[1] He immediately transferred to the 76th Regiment of Foot in India.[2] Promoted to lieutenant on 19 October 1869,[3] he joined the Indian Staff Corps on 11 December 1872[4] before being promoted to captain on 8 June 1879[5] on appointment to a squadron in the 3rd Punjab Cavalry.[2] Egerton served with his regiment in the Second Anglo-Afghan War in 1879 and was mentEarly in his career he took part in the Second Anglo-Afghan War, the Hazara Expedition and operations in the Khyber Pass
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