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Noh
Noh
Noh
(能, Nō), derived from the Sino-Japanese word for "skill" or "talent", is a major form of classical Japanese musical drama that has been performed since the 14th century. Developed by Kan'ami and his son Zeami, it is the oldest major theatre art that is still regularly performed today.[1] Traditionally, a Noh
Noh
program includes five Noh plays with comedic kyōgen plays in between; an abbreviated program of two Noh
Noh
plays and one kyōgen piece has become common in Noh presentations today. An okina (翁) play may be presented in the very beginning especially during New Years, holidays, and other special occasions.[2] Nō together with Kyōgen
Kyōgen
is part of Nōgaku
Nōgaku
theatre.[3] Noh
Noh
is often based on tales from traditional literature with a supernatural being transformed into human form as a hero narrating a story
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National Symbols Of Japan
National symbols of Japan
Japan
are the symbols that are used in Japan
Japan
to represent what is unique about the nation, reflecting different aspects of its cultural life and history.[1]Contents1 Symbols 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksSymbols[edit] This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.Symbol Image NotesFlag
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Music Of Japan
The music of Japan includes a wide array of performers in distinct styles both traditional and modern. The word for music in Japanese is 音楽 (ongaku), combining the kanji 音 "on" (sound) with the kanji 楽 "gaku" (enjoy).[1] Japan is the largest physical music market in the world, with US$2 billion in 2014 and the second largest overall music market, with a total retail value of 2.6 billion dollars in 2014[2] – dominated by Japanese artists, with 37 of the top 50 best selling albums[3] and 49 of the top 50 best selling singles in 2014.[4] Local music often appears at karaoke venues, which is on lease from the record labels
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Buddhism In Japan
Buddhism
Buddhism
in Japan has been practiced since its official introduction in 552 CE according to the Nihon Shoki[1] from Baekje, Korea, by Buddhist monks.[2][3] Buddhism
Buddhism
has had a major influence on the development of Japanese society and remains an influential aspect of the culture to this day.[4] In modern times, Japan's most popular schools of Buddhism
Buddhism
are Pure Land Buddhism, Nichiren
Nichiren
Buddhism, Shingon
Shingon
Buddhism
Buddhism
and Zen. As of 2008, approximately 34% of the Japanese identify as Buddhists and the number has been growing since the 1980s, in terms of membership in organized religion
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Christianity In Japan
Christianity in Japan
Japan
is among the nation's minority religions. Around 1 percent[1][2][3] of the population claims Christian
Christian
belief or affiliation. Most large Christian
Christian
denominations, including Roman Catholicism, Protestantism
Protestantism
and Orthodox Christianity, are represented in Japan
Japan
today
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Japanese New Religions
Japanese new religions
Japanese new religions
are new religious movements established in Japan. In Japanese they are called shinshūkyō (新宗教) or shinkō shūkyō (新興宗教). Japanese scholars classify all religious organizations founded since the middle of the 19th century as "new religions"; thus, the term refers to a great diversity and number of organizations. Most came into being in the mid-to-late twentieth century and are influenced by much older traditional religions including Shinto, Buddhism, and Hinduism. Western influences include Christianity, the Bible
Bible
and the writings of Nostradamus.[1][2]Contents1 Before World War II 2 After World War II2.1 Background 2.2 Influence3 Other nations 4 Statistics 5 See also 6 References 7 BibliographyBefore World War II[edit] In the 1860s Japan
Japan
began to experience great social turmoil and rapid modernization
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Shinto
Shinto
Shinto
(神道, Shintō) or kami-no-michi (among other names)[note 1] is the traditional religion of Japan
Japan
that focuses on ritual practices to be carried out diligently to establish a connection between present-day
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Ikebana
Ikebana
Ikebana
(生け花, "living flowers") is the Japanese art
Japanese art
of flower arrangement.[1][2] It is also known as Kadō (華道, "way of flowers"). The tradition dates back to the 7th century when floral offerings were made at altars. Later, they were placed in the tokonoma (alcove) of a home
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Japanese Garden
Japanese gardens (日本庭園, nihon teien) are traditional gardens[1] whose designs are accompanied by Japanese aesthetic and philosophical ideas, avoid artificial ornamentation, and highlight the natural landscape
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Japanese Pottery And Porcelain
Pottery
Pottery
and porcelain (陶磁器, tojiki) (also 焼きもの yakimono, or 陶芸 tōgei), is one of the oldest Japanese crafts and art forms, dating back to the Neolithic
Neolithic
period. Kilns have produced earthenware, pottery, stoneware, glazed pottery, glazed stoneware, porcelain, and blue-and-white ware. Japan has an exceptionally long and successful history of ceramic production. Earthenwares were created as early as the Jōmon
Jōmon
period (10,000–300 BCE), giving Japan one of the oldest ceramic traditions in the world. Japan is further distinguished by the unusual esteem that ceramics holds within its artistic tradition, owing to the enduring popularity of the tea ceremony. Japanese ceramic history records distinguished many potter names, and some were artist-potters, e.g
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Manga
Manga
Manga
(漫画, Manga) are comics created in Japan
Japan
or by creators in the Japanese language, conforming to a style developed in Japan
Japan
in the late 19th century.[1] They have a long and complex pre-history in earlier Japanese art.[2] The term manga (kanji: 漫画; hiragana: まんが; katakana: マンガ;  listen (help·info); English: /ˈmæŋɡə/ or /ˈmɑːŋɡə/) in Japan
Japan
is a word used to refer to both comics and cartooning. "Manga" as a term used outside Japan
Japan
refers to comics originally published in Japan.[3] In Japan, people of all ages read manga
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Media Of Japan
The communications media of Japan
Japan
include numerous television and radio networks as well as newspapers and magazines in Japan. For the most part, television networks were established based on capital investments by existing radio networks
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Japanese Festivals
Japanese festivals
Japanese festivals
are traditional festive occasions. Some festivals have their roots in Chinese festivals centuries ago, but have undergone great changes as they mixed with local customs. Some are so different that they do not even remotely resemble the original festival despite sharing the same name and date. There are also various local festivals (e.g. Tobata Gion) that are mostly unknown outside a given prefecture. It is commonly said that you will always find a festival somewhere in Japan. Unlike most people in East Asia, Japanese people
Japanese people
generally do not celebrate Lunar New Year (it having been supplanted by the Western New Year's Day, on January 1, in the late 19th century); although many Chinese residents in Japan, as well as some shrines and temples for religious purposes, still celebrate Lunar New Year in parallel with the Western New Year
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Television In Japan
Television
Television
in Japan
Japan
dates back to the 1920s, with Kenjiro Takayanagi's pioneering experiments in electronic television.[1] Television broadcasting began in the 1930s, but was halted by World War II, after which regular television broadcasting began in 1950.[2] After Japan developed the first HDTV systems in the 1960s, MUSE/Hi-Vision was introduced in the 1970s. A modified version of the NTSC
NTSC
system for analog signals, called NTSC-J, was used for analog broadcast until 2011. Starting July 24, 2011, the analog broadcast has ceased and only digital broadcast using the ISDB
ISDB
standard is available. All Japanese households having at least one television set are mandated to pay an annual subscription fee used to fund NHK, the Japanese public service broadcaster
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Cinema Of Japan
The cinema of Japan
Japan
(日本映画, Nihon eiga, also known domestically as 邦画 hōga, "domestic cinema") has a history that spans more than 100 years. Japan
Japan
has one of the oldest and largest film industries in the world; as of 2010, it was the fourth largest by number of feature films produced.[5] In 2011 Japan
Japan
produced 411 feature films that earned 54.9% of a box office total of US$2.338 billion.[6] Movies have been produced in Japan
Japan
since 1897, when the first foreign cameramen arrived. In a Sight & Sound list of the best films produced in Asia, Japanese works made up eight of the top 12, with Tokyo Story (1953) ranked number one
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Japanese Mobile Phone Culture
In Japan, mobile phones have become ubiquitous. In Japanese, mobile phones are called keitai denwa (携帯電話), literally "portable telephones," and are often known simply as keitai. Much of the Japanese population own cellular phones, most of which are equipped with enhancements such as video and camera capabilities. As of May 2008, 31.3% of elementary school students, and 57.6% of middle school students own a cell phone, with many of them accessing the Internet through them.[1] This pervasiveness and the particularities of their usage has led to the development of a mobile phone culture, or "keitai culture."Contents1 Features 2 Market 3 In use 4 Gyaru-moji 5 Cell phone novels 6 Mobile gaming 7 Decoration 8 Teenagers and mobile phones 9 Forefront of consumer technology 10 Negative aspects 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External linksFeatures[edit]A Japanese flip style cellular phoneJapan was a leader in mobile phone technology
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