HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Monyash
Monyash
Monyash
(/muhn-ee-ash/ munyash) is a village and civil parish in the Peak District
Peak District
in Derbyshire, England, about 5 miles (8.0 km) west of the market town Bakewell. It is centered on a village green about 265 metres (869 ft) above sea level at the head of Lathkill Dale in the limestone area known as the White Peak.[1][2] In the 2011 census the civil parish had a population of 314.[3] Tourism and farming (milk, beef and lamb) are the predominant activities of the village
[...More...]

"Monyash" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
(/ˈdɑːrbɪʃər, -ʃɪər/) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the northwest, West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
to the north, South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
to the northeast, Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
to the east, Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the southeast, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the west and southwest and Cheshire
Cheshire
also to the west
[...More...]

"Derbyshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
[...More...]

"Domesday Book" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
[...More...]

"Ordnance Survey National Grid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Places In Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
(/ˈdɑːrbɪʃər, -ʃɪər/) is a county in the East Midlands of England. A substantial portion of the Peak District National Park lies within Derbyshire, containing the southern extremity of the Pennine range of hills which extend into the north of the county. The county contains part of the National Forest, and borders on Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the northwest, West Yorkshire
West Yorkshire
to the north, South Yorkshire
South Yorkshire
to the northeast, Nottinghamshire
Nottinghamshire
to the east, Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the southeast, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
to the west and southwest and Cheshire
Cheshire
also to the west
[...More...]

"List Of Places In Derbyshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Civil Parishes In England
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
[...More...]

"Civil Parishes In England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Village Green
A village green is a common open area within a village or other settlement. Traditionally, a village green was common grassland at the centre of a rural settlement used for grazing with a pond for watering cattle and other stock. The village green also provided, and may still provide, an open-air meeting place for the local people, which may be used for public celebrations such as May Day
May Day
festivities. The term is used more broadly to encompass woodland, moorland, sports grounds, buildings and roads.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Village
Village
green Melmerby, CumbriaThe village green in Stanford in the Vale, OxfordshireA large green in the village of Pritzhagen, GermanySome historical village greens have been lost as a result of the agricultural revolution and urban development
[...More...]

"Village Green" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

White Peak
The White Peak is the lower, southern part of the Peak District in England. In contrast to the Dark Peak and South West Peak, the underlying limestone is not capped by impervious millstone grit, so caves and dry river valleys are common features of the area. The soils are poor and calcareous, creating grazing land for both sheep and cattle. Broadly speaking, the White Peak covers the Derbyshire Peaks from the Hope Valley southwards, and the Staffordshire Peaks[1] north of the Churnet Valley. The White Peak is one of 159 national character areas defined by Natural England; their defined area covers an area of 52,860 hectares (204 sq mi) and includes the area approximately bounded by Ashbourne, Buxton, Castleston, Matlock and Wirksworth.[2] The largest towns in the White Peak are outside the area of the Peak District national park. These towns include Matlock and Buxton, while Bakewell and most of the villages in the park are in the White Peak area
[...More...]

"White Peak" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United Kingdom Census 2011
A census of the population of the United Kingdom is taken every ten years. The 2011 census was held in all countries of the UK on 27 March 2011. It was the first UK census which could be completed online via the Internet.[1] The Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
(ONS) is responsible for the census in England
England
and Wales, the General Register Office for Scotland
Scotland
(GROS) is responsible for the census in Scotland, and the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA) is responsible for the census in Northern Ireland. The Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
is the executive office of the UK Statistics Authority, a non-ministerial department formed in 2008 and which reports directly to Parliament
[...More...]

"United Kingdom Census 2011" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arbor Low
Arbor Low
Arbor Low
is a Neolithic
Neolithic
henge monument in the Peak District, Derbyshire, England.[3] Arbor Low
Arbor Low
is in the White Peak
White Peak
area of the Peak District: the White Peak
White Peak
is a Carboniferous Limestone plateau lying between approximately 200 and 400 metres (660 and 1,310 ft) OD. The site is private property, accessible through the courtesy of the owner, and is managed by the Peak District
Peak District
National Park Authority.[3] As of February 2017, an entrance fee of £1 per adult is requested by the landowner
[...More...]

"Arbor Low" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anglo-Saxon
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
[...More...]

"Anglo-Saxon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Derbyshire Dales (UK Parliament Constituency)
Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Dales /ˈdɑːrbɪʃə deɪlz/ or /ˈdɑːrbiʃɪər deɪlz/ is a constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament by Patrick McLoughlin
Patrick McLoughlin
of the Conservative Party since being created for the 2010 general election.[n 2]Contents1 History 2 Constituency profile 3 Boundaries 4 Members of Parliament 5 Elections5.1 Elections in the 2010s6 See also 7 Notes and referencesHistory[edit] Following their review of parliamentary representation in Derbyshire, the Boundary Commission for England
Boundary Commission for England
created a new constituency of Derbyshire
Derbyshire
Dales which is almost coterminous with the previous seat of West Derbyshire. Constituency profile[edit] The constituency is geographically large
[...More...]

"Derbyshire Dales (UK Parliament Constituency)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tumulus
A tumulus (plural tumuli) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus. Tumuli are often categorised according to their external apparent shape. In this respect, a long barrow is a long tumulus, usually constructed on top of several burials, such as passage graves. A round barrow is a round tumulus, also commonly constructed on top of burials. The internal structure and architecture of both long and round barrows has a broad range, the categorization only refers to the external apparent shape. The method of inhumation may involve a dolmen, a cist, a mortuary enclosure, a mortuary house, or a chamber tomb
[...More...]

"Tumulus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Derbyshire Lead Mining History
This article details some of the history of lead mining in Derbyshire, England.Contents1 Background 2 Mining methods 3 16th-century technical change3.1 Bole smelting 3.2 Smelting
Smelting
mills 3.3 Dressing4 Mining customs4.1 King's farmers and chief barmasters 4.2 Chief barmasters and the 24 4.3 Deputy barmasters 4.4 Giving a mine 4.5 Title-holding and record keeping 4.6 Accidents 4.7 Structure of industry5 Pollution 6 Mine drainage 7 Cupola smelting 8 Closure 9 See also 10 References10.1 Footnotes 10.2 BibliographyBackground[edit]T'owd Man, WirksworthOn one of the walls in Wirksworth
Wirksworth
Church is a crude stone carving, found nearby at Bonsall and placed in the church in the 1870s.[1] Probably executed in Anglo-Saxon times, it shows a man carrying a kibble or basket in one hand and a pick in the other. He is a lead miner
[...More...]

"Derbyshire Lead Mining History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Church Of England Parish Church
A parish church in the Church of England
Church of England
is the church which acts as the religious centre for the people within the smallest and most basic Church of England
Church of England
administrative region, the parish – since the 19th century called the ecclesiastical parish (outside meetings of the church) to avoid confusion with the civil parish which many towns and villages have.Contents1 Parishes in England 2 Character 3 Notable parish churches 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksParishes in England[edit] In England, there are parish churches for both the Church of England and the Roman Catholic Church. References to a "parish church", without mention of a denomination, will, however, almost certainly be to those of the Church of England
Church of England
due to its status as the Established Church
[...More...]

"Church Of England Parish Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.