HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Mokosh
Mokoš (Old East Slavic: Мокошь) or Mati Syra Zemlya (literally "Damp Mother Earth"), is a Slavic goddess
Slavic goddess
mentioned in the Primary Chronicle, protector of women's work and women's destiny.[1] She watches over spinning and weaving, shearing of sheep,[citation needed] and protects women in child birth. Mokosh
Mokosh
is the Great Mother.[2] Mokoš was the only female deity whose idol was erected by Vladimir the Great in his Kiev
Kiev
sanctuary along with statues of other major gods (Perun, Hors, Dažbog, Stribog, and Simargl).Contents1 Etymology and origin 2 Myth 3 Christianization 4 Traces of Mokosh
Mokosh
in place names 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology and origin[edit] Mokosh
Mokosh
probably means moisture. According to Max Vasmer, her name is derived from the same root as Slavic words mokry, 'wet', and moknut(i), 'get wet'
[...More...]

"Mokosh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kurgan Stelae
Kurgan stelae (Mongolian: хүн чулуу; Russian: каменные бабы; Ukrainian: Баби кам'яні "stone babas"; Kyrgyz: балбал [bɑlbɑl]) or Balbals (балбал balbal, most probably from a Turkic word balbal meaning "ancestor" or "grandfather"[2] or the Mongolic word "barimal" which means "handmade statue") are anthropomorphic stone stelae, images cut from stone, installed atop, within or around kurgans (i.e. tumuli), in kurgan cemeteries, or in a double line extending from a kurgan. The stelae are also described as "obelisks" or "statue menhirs". Spanning more than three millennia, they are clearly the product of various cultures. The earliest are associated with the Pit Grave culture of the Pontic-Caspian steppe (and therefore with the Proto-Indo-Europeans according to the mainstream Kurgan hypothesis[3])
[...More...]

"Kurgan Stelae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christianization Of Kievan Rus'
The Christianization
Christianization
of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
took place in several stages. In early 867, Patriarch Photius of Constantinople
Constantinople
announced to other Orthodox patriarchs that the Rus', baptised by his bishop, took to Christianity
Christianity
with particular enthusiasm
[...More...]

"Christianization Of Kievan Rus'" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

East Slavs
Majority: Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
(Belarus, Moldova, Russia, Ukraine). Minority: Baltics (Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania), Caucasus
Caucasus
(Armenia, Azerbaijan, Chechnya, Georgia), other former Soviet states.LanguagesEast Slavic languages: Belarusian, Russian, UkrainianReligio
[...More...]

"East Slavs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Polans (eastern)
The Polans (Ukrainian: Поляни, Polyany), also Polianians, were an East Slavic tribe between the 6th and the 9th century, which inhabited both sides of the Dnieper river from Liubech to Rodnia and also down the lower streams of the rivers Ros', Sula, Stuhna, Teteriv, Irpin', Desna and Pripyat
[...More...]

"Polans (eastern)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nomad
A nomad (Greek: νομάς, nomas, plural tribe) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.[2] Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer, the pastoral nomad owning livestock, or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world.[3] Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method.[citation needed] Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover.[citation needed] Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe, tundra, or ice and sand, where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
[...More...]

"Nomad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Spinning (textiles)
Spinning is the twisting together of drawn-out strands of fibers to form yarn, and is a major part of the textile industry. The yarn is then used to create textiles, which are then used to make clothing and many other products. There are several industrial processes available to spin yarn, as well as hand-spinning techniques where the fiber is drawn out, twisted, and wound onto a bobbin.Contents1 Types of fibre 2 Methods 3 History and economics 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 External linksTypes of fibre[edit] Artificial fibres are made by extruding a polymer through a spinneret into a medium where it hardens. Wet spinning (rayon) uses a coagulating medium. In dry spinning (acetate and triacetate), the polymer is contained in a solvent that evaporates in the heated exit chamber
[...More...]

"Spinning (textiles)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
Europe
is the eastern part of the European continent. There is no consensus on the precise area it covers, partly because the term has a wide range of geopolitical, geographical, cultural, and socioeconomic connotations. There are "almost as many definitions of Eastern Europe
Europe
as there are scholars of the region".[1] A related United Nations
United Nations
paper adds that "every assessment of spatial identities is essentially a social and cultural construct".[2] One definition describes Eastern Europe
Europe
as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe
Europe
with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences.[3][4] Another definition was created during the Cold War and used more or less synonymously with the term Eastern Bloc
[...More...]

"Eastern Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Boris Rybakov
Boris Alexandrovich Rybakov (Russian: Бори́с Алекса́ндрович Рыбако́в, 3 June 1908, Moscow — 27 December 2001) was a Soviet and Russian historian who personified the anti-Normanist vision of Russian history. Rybakov held a chair in Russian history at the Moscow University since 1939, was a deputy dean of the university in 1952-54, and administered the Russian History Institute for 40 years
[...More...]

"Boris Rybakov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Moksha
Moksha
Moksha
(/ˈmoʊkʃə/; Sanskrit: मोक्ष, mokṣa), also called vimoksha, vimukti and mukti,[1] is a term in Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism
Jainism
which refers to various forms of emancipation, liberation, and release.[2] In its soter
[...More...]

"Moksha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Max Vasmer
Max Julius Friedrich Vasmer (German: [ˈfasmɐ]; Russian: Макс Ю́лиус Фри́дрих Фа́смер; 28 February 1886 – 30 November 1962) was a Russian-born German linguist. He studied problems of etymology in Indo-European, Finno-Ugric and Turkic languages and worked on the history of Slavic, Baltic, Iranian, and Finno-Ugric peoples.Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Born to German parents in Saint Petersburg, Vasmer graduated from Saint Petersburg
Saint Petersburg
University in 1907. From 1910, he delivered lectures there as a professor. During the Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
of 1917–1922, he worked in the Universities of Saratov and of Yuryev (Tartu). In 1921, he settled in Leipzig, but in 1925 moved to Berlin. In 1938–1939, he delivered lectures at Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City
[...More...]

"Max Vasmer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mokshas
The Mokshas
Mokshas
(also Mokshans, Moksha people, in Moksha: Мокшет/Mokšet) are a Mordvinian ethnic group belonging to the Volgaic branch of the Finno-Ugric peoples[3] who live in the Russian Federation, mostly near the Volga and Moksha rivers,[4] a tributary of the Oka River. Their native language is Mokshan, one of the two surviving members of the Mordvinic branch of the Uralic language
Uralic language
family
[...More...]

"Mokshas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Moksha Language
The Moksha language
Moksha language
(Moksha: мокшень кяль, translit. mokšeny käl) is a member of the Mordvinic branch of the Uralic languages, with around 2,000 native speakers (2010 Russian census). Moksha is the majority language in the western part of Mordovia.[3] Its closest relative is the Erzya language, with which it is not mutually intelligible. Moksha is also considered to be closely related to the extinct Meshcherian and Muromian languages.[4]Contents1 Official status 2 Education 3 Dialects 4 Phonology4.1 Vowels 4.2 Consonants4.2.1 Devoicing4.3 Stress5 Grammar 6 Writing system 7 Literature 8 Common expressions (Moksha–Russian–English) 9 See also 10 References 11 Bibliography 12 External linksOfficial status[edit] Moksha is one of the three official languages in Mordovia
Mordovia
(the others being Erzya and Russian)
[...More...]

"Moksha Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Radoslav Katičić
Radoslav Katičić (pronounced [rǎdoslaʋ kâtitʃitɕ]; born in Zagreb, July 3, 1930) is a Croatian linguist, classical philologist, Indo-Europeanist, Slavist and Indologist, one of the most prominent Croatian scholars in the field of humanities.Contents1 Biography 2 Work 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Radoslav Katičić was born on July 3, 1930 in Zagreb. In his birth city he attended primary school, and in 1949 he graduated at the Classical gymnasium. At the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, he received a degree in Classical Philology in 1954. The same year he started working as a part-time librarian at the Seminar for Classical Philology at the same faculty
[...More...]

"Radoslav Katičić" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.