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Moharebeh
Ḥirābah (Arabic: حرابة‎) is an Arabic
Arabic
word for “piracy”, or “unlawful warfare”. Hirabah comes from the root ḥrb, which means “to become angry and enraged”. The noun ḥarb (حَرْب, pl
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Fiqh
Fiqh
Fiqh
(/fɪk/; Arabic: فقه‎ [fɪqh]) is Islamic jurisprudence.[1] While sharia is believed by Muslims to represent divine law as revealed in the Quran
Quran
and the Sunnah
Sunnah
(the teachings and practices of the Islamic prophet
Islamic prophet
Muhammad), fiqh is the human understanding of the sharia[2]—sharia expanded and developed by interpretation (ijtihad) of the Quran
Quran
and Sunnah
Sunnah
by Islamic jurists (ulama)[2] and implemented by the rulings (fatwa) of jurists on questions presented to them. Thus conceptually, whereas sharia is considered immutable and infallible, fiqh is considered fallible and changeable. Fiqh
Fiqh
deals with the observance of rituals, morals and social legislation in Islam
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Khula
Khulʿ (Arabic: خلع‎), also called khula, is a procedure through which a woman can divorce her husband in Islam, by returning the dower (mahr) that she received from her husband.[1] Based on traditional fiqh, and referenced in the Quran
Quran
and hadith, khul' allows a woman to initiate a divorce through the mutual consent of the husband or a judicial decree.Contents1 Origins in Texts1.1 Quran 1.2 Hadith2 Related issues2.1 Compensation 2.2 Consent of the Husband 2.3 Role of the Court 2.4 Iddah 2.5 Custody3 Interpretations By Region3.1 Pakistan 3.2 North America 3.3 Egypt 3.
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Marriage In Islam
In Islam, marriage is a legal contract between two people. Both the groom and the bride are to consent to the marriage of their own free wills. A formal, binding contract is considered integral to a religiously valid Islamic marriage, and outlines the rights and responsibilities of the groom and bride. There must be two Muslim witnesses of the marriage contract
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Islamic Marriage Contract
An Islamic
Islamic
marriage contract is an Islamic
Islamic
prenuptial agreement. It is a formal, binding contract considered an integral part of an Islamic marriage, and outlines the rights and responsibilities of the groom and bride or other parties involved in marriage proceedings.Contents1 Witnessing 2 Authorization 3 Type and content 4 Purposes 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksWitnessing[edit] In Sunni
Sunni
Islam, a marriage contract must have two male witnesses, or, in the Hanafi
Hanafi
school of jurisprudence, one man and two women, if a second male is unavailable.[citation needed] Proper witnessing is critical to the validation of the marriage, also acting as a protection against suspicions of adulterous relationships
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Mahr
In Islam, a mahr (in Arabic: مهر‎; Persian: مهريه‎; Turkish: Mehir also transliterated mehr, meher, mehrieh or mahriyeh) is a mandatory payment, in the form of money or possessions paid or promised to be paid by the groom, or by groom's father, to the bride at the time of marriage, that legally becomes her property.[1] While the mahr is often money, it can also be anything agreed upon by the bride such as jewelry, home goods, furniture, a dwelling or some land. Mahr is typically specified in the marriage contract signed during an Islamic marriage. "Dower" is the English translation that comes closest to Islamic meaning of mahr, as "dower" refers to the payment from the husband or his family to the wife, especially to support her in the event of his death
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Nikah Misyar
A misyar marriage' (Arabic: نكاح المسيار‎, translit. nikah al-misyar or more often زواج المسيار zawaj al-misyar "traveller's marriage") is a type of Sunni
Sunni
marriage contract (some aspects are similar to mutah marriage in Shia Islam). The husband and wife thus joined renounce several marital rights such as living together, the wife's rights to housing and maintenance money (nafaqa), and the husband's right to homekeeping and access.[1]Contents1 Background and causes 2 In practice 3 Legality 4 Criticism 5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 External links7.1 English 7.2 ArabicBackground and causes[e
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Nikah Halala
Halala (Urdu: حلالہ) is an Islamic marriage practiced primarily by certain sects of Sunni Muslims, which involves a female divorcee marrying someone else, consummating the marriage and then getting separated in form of divorce or by becoming widow, in order to make it allowable to remarry her previous husband. Halala is a sort of punishment given to Muslim
Muslim
men who divorce their wives without thinking twice. Forcing a woman to remarry with intention to get divorced again is crime in Islam. This practice is rejected by prominent Sunni scholars[1]Contents1 Overview 2 India 3 UK 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] According to the Qur'an
Qur'an
(2:229, 2:230):"Divorce is twice. Then, either keep [her] in an acceptable manner or release [her] with good treatment
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Nikah 'urfi
Nikah 'urfi is a "customary" Sunni Muslim
Sunni Muslim
marriage contract that requires a walī (guardian) and witnesses but not to be officially registered with state authorities. Couples repeat the words, "We got married" and pledge commitment, although there are many other informal ways in which people marry 'urfi. Usually a paper, stating that the two are married, is written and at least two witnesses sign it, although others may record their commitment on a cassette tape and use other forms of documentation. Most Arab countries do not recognize 'Urfi marriages and do not allow partners to get a 'legal' divorce since the government does not recognize the legality of the marriage in the first place. Sometimes these relationships are a way for people to have sex with each other within what is perceived to be a licit framework
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Nikah Mut‘ah
Nikah mut'ah[1][2] (Arabic: نکاح المتعة‎, translit. nikāḥ al-mutʿah, literally "pleasure marriage";[3](p1045)or Sigheh[4] (Persian: صیغه‎) is a private and verbal temporary marriage contract that is practiced in Twelver Shia
Shia
Islam[dubious – discuss] in which the duration of the marriage and the mahr must be specified and agreed upon in advance.[1][5][6](p242)[7](p47–53) It is a private contract made in a verbal or written format
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Polygyny In Islam
Under Sunni and Shia Islamic marital jurisprudence, Muslim men are allowed to practice polygyny, that is, they can have more than one wife at the same time, up to a total of four. Polyandry, the practice of a woman having more than one husband, by contrast, is not permitted. Polygamy
Polygamy
for Muslims, in practice and in law, differs greatly throughout the Islamic world
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Divorce In Islam
Divorce in Islam
Islam
can take a variety of forms, some initiated by the husband and some initiated by the wife. The main traditional legal categories are talaq (repudiation), khulʿ (mutual divorce), judicial divorce and oaths
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Zihar
Zihar (Arabic: ظھار‎) is a term used in Islamic Jurisprudence, which literally means “you are like my mother”.[1][2][3] It is a form of divorce (though invalid) and if a husband says these words to his wife, it is not lawful for him to have intercourse with her unless he recompense by freeing a slave or fasting for two successive months or feeding sixty poor people.[4] Background[edit] Zihar was accepted as a declaration of divorce among pagan Arabs[5] and it is mentioned in the Quran
Quran
in reference to Khawla bint Tha'labah, who was divorced by this formula in the chapter 58, verses 1-4:[6]“ God has surely heard the words of her who pleaded with you against her husband and made her plaint to God. God has heard what you two said to each other. Surely God hears all and observes all. Those of you who divorce their wives by declaring them to be their mothers' backs should know that they are not their mothers
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Dhimmi
A dhimmī (Arabic: ذمي‎ ḏimmī, IPA: [ˈðɪmmiː], collectively أهل الذمة ahl ul-ḏimmah/dhimmah "the people of the dhimma") is a historical[1] term referring to non-Muslims living in an Islamic state
Islamic state
with legal protection.[1][2]:470 The word literally means "protected person".[3] According to scholars, dhimmis had their rights fully protected in their communities, but as citizens in the Islamic state, had certain restrictions,[4] and it was obligatory for them to pay the jizya tax, which complemented the zakat, or alms, paid by the
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Iddah
In Islam, iddah or iddat (Arabic: العدة‎; period of waiting) is the period a woman must observe after the death of her spouse or after a divorce, during which she may not marry another man.[1]:472[2] Its purpose is to ensure that the male parent of any offspring produced after the cessation of a nikah (marriage) would be known
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Kafa'ah
Kafa'ah or Kafaah (Arabic: الكفاءة‎; al-kafā'aḥ) is a term used in the field of Islamic jurisprudence with regard to marriage in Islam, which in Arabic, literally means, equality or equivalence.[1][2] It is thus defined as the compatibility or equivalence between a prospective husband and his prospective wife which should be adhered to.[3] This compatibility is dependent on multiple factors that include religion, social status, morality, piety, wealth, lineage or custom.[4][5]Contents1 Legal Rulings1.1 The Hanafi
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