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Mensch
Mensch (Yiddish: מענטש‎ mentsh, cognate with the German word Mensch meaning a "human being") means "a person of integrity and honor".[1] The opposite of a "mensch" is an "unmensch", meaning an utterly unlikeable or unfriendly person. According to Leo Rosten, the Yiddish
Yiddish
maven and author of The Joys of Yiddish, a "mensch" is "someone to admire and emulate, someone of noble character
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Hanukkah Gelt
Hanukkah
Hanukkah
gelt (Yiddish: חנוכה געלט‎ ḥanukah gelt ; Hebrew: דמי חנוכה‬ dmei ḥanukah, both meaning literally " Hanukkah
Hanukkah
money") refers to money as well as chocolate coins given to Jewish children on the festival of Hanukkah.Contents1 History1.1 Money 1.2 Chocolate2 Customs 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Money[edit] Rabbi
Rabbi
A. P. Bloch has written that"The tradition of giving money (Chanukah gelt) to children is of long standing. The custom had its origin in the 17th-century practice of Polish Jewry to give money to their small children for distribution to their teachers. In time, as children demanded their due, money was also given to children to keep for themselves. Teenage boys soon came in for their share
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Dreidel
A dreidel (Yiddish: דרײדל‎ dreydl plural: dreydlekh,[1] Hebrew: סביבון‎ sevivon) is a four-sided spinning top, played with during the Jewish holiday
Jewish holiday
of Hanukkah. The dreidel is a Jewish variant on the teetotum, a gambling toy found in many European cultures. Each side of the dreidel bears a letter of the Hebrew
Hebrew
alphabet: נ‬ (Nun), ג‬ (Gimel), ה‬ (Hei), ש‬ (Shin), which together form the acronym for "נס גדול היה שם‬" (Nes Gadol Hayah Sham – "a great miracle happened there"). These letters were originally a mnemonic for the rules of a gambling game played with a dreidel: Nun stands for the Yiddish
Yiddish
word nisht ("nothing"), Hei stands for halb ("half"), Gimel
Gimel
for gants ("all"), and Shin for shtel ayn ("put in")
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Menorah (Hanukkah)
The Hanukkah
Hanukkah
menorah, also chanukiah or hanukkiah (Hebrew: מנורת חנוכה‬ menorat ḥanukkah, pl. menorot; also Hebrew: חַנֻכִּיָּה‬ ḥanukkiyah, or chanukkiyah, pl. ḥanukkiyot/chanukkiyot, or Yiddish: חנוכּה לאָמפּ‎ khanike lomp, lit.: Hanukkah
Hanukkah
lamp) is a nine-branched candelabrum lit during the eight-day holiday of Hanukkah, as opposed to the seven-branched menorah used in the ancient Temple or as a symbol. On each night of Hanukkah
Hanukkah
a new branch is lit. The ninth holder, called the shamash ("helper" or "servant"), is for a candle used to light all other candles and/or to be used as an extra light
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Judas Maccabeus
Judah Maccabee (or Judas Maccabeus, also spelled Machabeus, or Maccabaeus, Hebrew: יהודה המכבי,[1] Yehudah ha-Makabi) was a Jewish
Jewish
priest (kohen) and a son of the priest Mattathias
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Hasidic
Hasidism, sometimes Hasidic Judaism
Judaism
(Hebrew: חסידות‎, translit. hasidut, [χaˈsidus]; originally, "piety"), is a Jewish religious group. It arose as a spiritual revival movement in contemporary Western Ukraine
Western Ukraine
during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe. Today, most affiliates reside in the United States, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Israel
Israel
Ben Eliezer, the " Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov", is regarded as its founding father, and his disciples developed and disseminated it. Present-day Hasidism is a sub-group within Ultra-Orthodox ("Haredi") Judaism, and is noted for its religious conservatism and social seclusion
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Rabbi
In Judaism, a rabbi /ˈræbaɪ/ is a teacher of Torah. The basic form of the rabbi developed in the Pharisaic and Talmudic era, when learned teachers assembled to codify Judaism's written and oral laws. The first sage for whom the Mishnah
Mishnah
uses the title of rabbi was Yohanan ben Zakkai, active in the early-to-mid first century CE.[1] In more recent centuries, the duties of a rabbi became increasingly influenced by the duties of the Protestant Christian minister, hence the title "pulpit rabbis", and in 19th-century Germany and the United States rabbinic activities including sermons, pastoral counseling, and representing the community to the outside, all increased in importance. Within the various Jewish denominations there are different requirements for rabbinic ordination, and differences in opinion regarding who is to be recognized as a rabbi
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Hanukkah
Hanukkah
Hanukkah
(/ˈhɑːnəkə/ HAH-nə-kə; Hebrew: חֲנֻכָּה‬ khanuká, Tiberian: khanuká, usually spelled חנוכה‎, pronounced [χanuˈka] in Modern Hebrew, [ˈχanukə] or [ˈχanikə] in Yiddish; a transliteration also romanized as Chanukah or Ḥanukah) is a Jewish holiday
Jewish holiday
commemorating the rededication of the Holy Temple (the Second Temple) in Jerusalem
Jerusalem
at the time of the Maccabean
Maccabean
Revolt against the Seleucid
Seleucid
Empire. Hanukkah
Hanukkah
is observed for eight nights and days, starting on the 25th day of Kislev
Kislev
according to the Hebrew calendar, which may occur at any time from late November to late December in the Gregorian calendar
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Hasbro
Hasbro, Inc. (/ˈhæzbroʊ/; an abbreviation of its original name, Hassenfeld Brothers) is an American multinational toy and board game company. It is the largest toy maker in the world in terms of stock market value, and third largest with revenues of approximately $5.12 billion.[4][5] Hasbro
Hasbro
acquired the trademarks and products of Kenner, Parker Brothers, and Milton Bradley, among others. Among its products are Monopoly, G.I. Joe, Furby, Transformers, Nerf, My Little Pony, and Yo-Kai Watch. The Hasbro
Hasbro
brand also spawned TV shows to promote its products, such as Family Game Night on the Discovery Family
Discovery Family
network. The corporate headquarters is located in Pawtucket, Rhode Island
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Cognate
In linguistics, cognates are words that have a common etymological origin.[1] For example, the English word dish and the German word Tisch ("table"), are cognates because they both come from Latin discus, which relates to their flat surfaces. Cognates may have evolved similar, different or even opposite meanings. But, in most cases, there are some similar letters in the word. Some words sound similar, but don't come from the same root. These are called false cognates and are described in more detail below. In etymology, the cognate category excludes doublets and loanwords. The word cognate derives from the Latin
Latin
noun cognatus, which means "blood relative".[2]Contents1 Characteristics 2 Across languages 3 Within the same language 4 False cognates 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Cognates do not need to have the same meaning, which may have changed as the languages developed separately
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Cicero
Marcus Tullius Cicero[n 1] (/ˈsɪsəroʊ/; Classical Latin: [ˈmaːr.kʊs ˈtʊl.lɪ.ʊs ˈkɪ.kɛ.roː]; 3 January 106 BC – 7 December 43 BC) was a Roman politician and lawyer, who served as consul in the year 63 BC. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists.[2][3] His influence on the Latin
Latin
language was so immense that the subsequent history of prose, not only in
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Humanism
Humanism
Humanism
is a philosophical and ethical stance that emphasizes the value and agency of human beings, individually and collectively, and generally prefers critical thinking and evidence (rationalism and empiricism) over acceptance of dogma or superstition. The meaning of the term humanism has fluctuated according to the successive intellectual movements which have identified with it.[1] The term was coined by theologian Friedrich Niethammer at the beginning of the 19th century to refer to a system of education based on the study of classical literature ("classical humanism")
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Compassion
Compassion
Compassion
motivates people to go out of their way to help the physical, mental or emotional pains of another and themselves. Compassion
Compassion
is often regarded as having sensitivity, an emotional aspect to suffering, though when based on cerebral notions such as fairness, justice, and interdependence, it may be considered rational in nature and its application understood as an activity also based on sound judgment. There is also an aspect of equal dimension, such that individual's compassion is often given a property of "depth", "vigour", or "passion"
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Philosophy
Philosophy
Philosophy
(from Greek φιλοσοφία, philosophia, literally "love of wisdom"[1][2][3][4]) is the study of general and fundamental problems concerning matters such as existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language.[5][6] The term was probably coined by Pythagoras
Pythagoras
(c. 570–495 BCE)
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