HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Mem
Mem (also spelled Meem, Meme, or Mim) is the thirteenth letter of the Semitic abjads, including Phoenician Mēm , Hebrew Mēm מ, Aramaic Mem , Syriac Mīm ܡܡ, and Arabic
Arabic
Mīm م
[...More...]

"Mem" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Adjective
In linguistics, an adjective (abbreviated adj) is a describing word, the main syntactic role of which is to qualify a noun or noun phrase, giving more information about the object signified.[1] Adjectives are one of the English parts of speech, although historically they were classed together with the nouns.[2] Certain words that were traditionally considered to be adjectives, including the, this, my, etc., are today usually classed separately, as determiners.Contents1 Etymology 2 Types of use 3 Distribution 4 Adverbs 5 Determiners 6 Adjective phrases 7 Other modifiers of nouns 8 Order 9 Comparison 10 Restrictiveness 11 Agreement 12 See also 13 References 14 Bibliography 15 External linksEtymology[edit] See also:
[...More...]

"Adjective" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mu (letter)
Mu (uppercase Μ, lowercase μ; Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
μῦ [mŷː], Greek: μι or μυ -- both [mi]) is the 12th letter of the Greek alphabet. In the system of Greek numerals
Greek numerals
it has a value of 40. Mu was derived from the Egyptian hieroglyphic symbol for water (𓈖), which had been simplified by the Phoenicians and named after their word for water, to become 𐤌img (mem)
[...More...]

"Mu (letter)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monospaced Font
A monospaced font, also called a fixed-pitch, fixed-width, or non-proportional font, is a font whose letters and characters each occupy the same amount of horizontal space.[1] This contrasts with variable-width fonts, where the letters and spacings have different widths. Monospaced fonts are customary on typewriters and for typesetting computer code.Contents1 Use in computers1.1 Use in art 1.2 Tabular figures2 Other uses 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksUse in computers[edit] Monospaced fonts were widely used in early computers and computer terminals, which often had extremely limited graphical capabilities. Hardware implementation was simplified by using a text mode where the screen layout was addressed as a regular grid of tiles, each of which could be set to display a character by indexing into the hardware's character map. Some systems allowed colored text to be displayed by varying the foreground and background color for each tile
[...More...]

"Monospaced Font" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Verbal Noun
A verbal noun is a noun formed from or otherwise corresponding to a verb. Different languages have different types of verbal nouns and different ways of forming and using them. An example of a verbal noun in English is the word singing in the sentence "Singing is fun" (this is a noun formed from the verb sing). Verbal nouns may be non-finite verb forms such as infinitives or gerunds in English (or Latin) usage. They may also be "pure" verbal nouns, formed from verbs, but behaving grammatically entirely like nouns rather than verbs (not taking direct objects, for example). Such cases may also be called deverbal nouns. Types[edit] Verbal nouns may be non-finite verb forms which follow verb syntax, for example by taking appropriate objects (though usually not a subject) and being modified by adverbs, to produce a verb phrase which is then used within a larger sentence as a noun phrase. In English this can be done with the to-infinitive and with the gerund
[...More...]

"Verbal Noun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Phoenicia
Coordinates: 34°07′25″N 35°39′04″E / 34.12361°N 35.65111°E / 34.12361; 35.65111Phoeniciaknʿn / kanaʿan  (Phoenician) Φοινίκη / Phoiníkē  (Greek)1500 BC[1]–539 BCMap of Phoenicia
Phoenicia
and its Mediterranean trade routesCapital Not specifiedLanguages Phoenician, PunicReligion Canaanite religionGovernment City-states ruled by kingsWell-known kings of Phoenician cities •  c. 1000 BC Ahiram •  969 – 936 BC Hiram I •  820 – 774 BC
[...More...]

"Phoenicia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

N-water Ripple (n Hieroglyph)
The following is a list of Egyptian hieroglyphs. The total number of distinct hieroglyphs increased over time from several hundred in the Middle Kingdom to several thousand in Ptolemaic Egypt. The most widely-used list of hieroglyphs is Gardiner's sign list (1928/9) which includes 763 signs in 26 categories. Georg Möller compiled more extensive lists, organised by historical epoch (published posthumously in 1927 and 1936). The Unicode Egyptian Hieroglyphs block (Unicode version 5.2, 2009) includes 1,071 signs, with organisation based on Gardiner's list
[...More...]

"N-water Ripple (n Hieroglyph)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Egyptian Hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
(/ˈhaɪrəˌɡlɪf, -roʊ-/[2][3]) were the formal writing system used in Ancient Egypt. It combined logographic, syllabic and alphabetic elements, with a total of some 1,000 distinct characters.[4][5] Cursive hieroglyphs
Cursive hieroglyphs
were used for religious literature on papyrus and wood. The later hieratic and demotic Egyptian scripts were derived from hieroglyphic writing; Meroitic was a late derivation from demotic. The use of hieroglyphic writing arose from proto-literate symbol systems in the Early Bronze Age, around the 32nd century BC (Naqada III),[1] with the first decipherable sentence written in the Egyptian language dating to the Second Dynasty
Second Dynasty
(28th century BC)
[...More...]

"Egyptian Hieroglyphs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Em (Cyrillic)
Em (М м; italics: М м) is a letter of the Cyrillic script.[1] Em commonly represents the bilabial nasal consonant /m/, like the pronunciation of ⟨m⟩ in "him". It is derived from the Greek letter Mu ( Μ
Μ
μ).Contents1 Usage 2 Related letters and other similar characters 3 Computing codes 4 References 5 External linksUsage[edit] As used in the alphabets of various languages, Em represents the following sounds:bilabial nasal consonant /m/, like the pronunciation of ⟨m⟩ in "him" palatalized bilabial nasal consonant /mʲ/The pronunciations shown in the table are the primary ones for each language; fo
[...More...]

"Em (Cyrillic)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin Alphabet
Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
32 c. BCE Hieratic
Hieratic
32 c. BCEDemotic 7 c. BCEMeroitic 3 c. BCEProto-Sinaitic 19 c. BCEUgaritic 15 c. BCE Epigraphic South Arabian 9 c. BCEGe’ez 5–6 c. BCEPhoenician 12 c. BCEPaleo-Hebrew 10 c. BCESamaritan 6 c. BCE Libyco-Berber
Libyco-Berber
3 c. BCETifinaghPaleohispanic (semi-syllabic) 7 c. BCE Aramaic 8 c. BCE Kharoṣṭhī
Kharoṣṭhī
4 c. BCE Brāhmī 4 c. BCE Brahmic family
Brahmic family
(see)E.g. Tibetan 7 c. CE Devanagari
Devanagari
13 c. CECanadian syllabics 1840Hebrew 3 c. BCE Pahlavi 3 c. BCEAvestan 4 c. CEPalmyrene 2 c. BCE Syriac 2 c. BCENabataean 2 c. BCEArabic 4 c. CEN'Ko 1949 CESogdian 2 c. BCEOrkhon (old Turkic) 6 c. CEOld Hungarian c. 650 CEOld UyghurMongolian 1204 CEMandaic 2 c. CEGreek 8 c. BCEEtruscan 8 c
[...More...]

"Latin Alphabet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Serif
In typography, a serif (/ˈsɛrɪf/) is a small line attached to the end of a stroke in a letter or symbol.[1] A typeface with serifs is called a serif typeface (or serifed typeface). A typeface without serifs is called sans-serif or sans serif, from the French sans, meaning "without". Some typography sources refer to sans-serif typefaces as "Grotesque" (in German "grotesk") or "Gothic",[2] and serif typefaces as "Roman".Contents1 Origins and etymology 2 Classification2.1 Old-style 2.2 Transitional 2.3 Didone 2.4 Slab serif 2.5 Other styles3 Readability and legibility 4 Readability debate 5 East Asian analogues 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 SourcesOrigins and etymology[edit]Roman brushed capitals: Capitalis rusticaSerifs originated in the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
with inscriptional lettering—words carved into stone in Roman antiquity
[...More...]

"Serif" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Etruscan Alphabet
Old Italic is one of several now extinct alphabet systems used on the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
in ancient times for various Indo-European languages (predominantly Italic) and non-Indo-European (e.g. Etruscan) languages. The alphabets derive from the Euboean Greek
Euboean Greek
Cumaean alphabet, used at Ischia
Ischia
and Cumae
Cumae
in the Bay of Naples
Bay of Naples
in the eighth century BC. Various Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
belonging to the Italic branch (Faliscan and members of the Sabellian group, including Oscan, Umbrian, and South Picene, and other Indo-European branches such as Celtic, Venetic
Venetic
and Messapic) originally used the alphabet
[...More...]

"Etruscan Alphabet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bilabial Nasal
The bilabial nasal is a type of consonantal sound used in almost all spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨m⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is m. The bilabial nasal occurs in English, and it is the sound represented by "m" in map and rum. It occurs nearly universally, and few languages (e.g. Mohawk) are known to lack this sound.Contents1 Features 2 Occurrence 3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyFeatures[edit] Features of the bilabial nasal:Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract
[...More...]

"Bilabial Nasal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

UTF-8
UTF-8
UTF-8
is a variable width character encoding capable of encoding all 1,112,064[1] valid code points in Unicode
Unicode
using one to four 8-bit bytes.[2] The encoding is defined by the Unicode
Unicode
standard, and was originally designed by Ken Thompson
Ken Thompson
and Rob Pike.[3][4] The name is derived from Unicode
Unicode
(or Universal Coded Character Set) Transformation Format – 8-bit.[5] It was designed for backward compatibility with ASCII. Code points with lower numerical values, which tend to occur more frequently, are encoded using fewer bytes. The first 128 characters of Unicode, which correspond one-to-one with ASCII, are encoded using a single octet with the same binary value as ASCII, so that valid ASCII
ASCII
text is valid UTF-8-encoded Unicode
Unicode
as well
[...More...]

"UTF-8" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.