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Masaesyli
The Masaesyli were a Berber tribe of western Numidia[1] and the main antagonists of the Massylii in eastern Numidia. During the Second Punic War
Second Punic War
the Masaesyli initially supported the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and were led by Syphax
Syphax
against the Massylii, who were led by Masinissa. After Masinissa
Masinissa
threatened to unite all Numidians
Numidians
in a confederacy against Rome, the Masaesyli turned against Rome and undertook the siege of Carthage. Syphax
Syphax
was defeated, however, and spent the remainder of his days in Roman captivity, while his tribe was assimilated into the kingdom of Masinissa.Notes[edit]^ Good, John (1819). Pantologia
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Arab-Berber
Arab-Berber
Arab-Berber
(Arabic: العرب والبربر‎; French: Arabo-berbères) is a term to denote a Maghrebis
Maghrebis
inhabitant of the North African Maghreb
Maghreb
who is of mixed Berber and Arab
Arab
origin and whose native language is a variant of Maghrebi Arabic
Maghrebi Arabic
and who also identifies as an Arab.[5][6][7][8][9][10] While some Arab-Berbers claim West Asian descent, genetic studies there have determined that Arab
Arab
and non- Arab
Arab
Berbers
Berbers
are genetically nearly identical
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Carthage
Carthage
Carthage
(/ˈkɑːrθɪdʒ/, from Latin: Carthago; Phoenician: Qart-ḥadašt ("New city")) was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis
Tunis
in what is now the Tunis Governorate
Tunis Governorate
in Tunisia. The city developed from a Phoenician colony into the capital of an empire dominating the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.[1] The legendary Queen Dido
Dido
is regarded as the founder of the city, though her historicity has been questioned. According to accounts by Timaeus of Tauromenium, she purchased from a local tribe the amount of land that could be covered by an oxhide
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Jarawa (Berber Tribe)
Jarawa may refer to:Jarawas (Andaman Islands), one of the indigenous peoples of the Andaman Islands Jarawa language (Andaman Islands) Jarawa (Berber tribe), a Berber tribal confederacy that flourished in northwest Africa during the seventh century Jarawa (Nigeria), an ethnic group in Plateau State, Nigeria
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Berber Jews
Berber Jews
Berber Jews
are the Jewish communities of the Atlas mountains
Atlas mountains
in Morocco, and previously in Algeria, which historically spoke Berber languages. Between 1950 and 1970 most emigrated to France, the United States, or Israel.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Antiquity 1.2 Islamic period 1.3 After the Arab–Israeli War2 Origin 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Antiquity[edit] Jews have settled in North Africa
North Africa
since Roman times and a Jewish community existed in the Roman province of Africa, which is modern Tunisia
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Musulamii
The Musulamii
Musulamii
were a confederation of the Berber Gaetulian tribes,[1] who inhabited the desert regions of what is today known as Chotts Regions in Tunisia
Tunisia
and Algeria, as well as the Roman province of Mauretania Caesariensis, which was annexed to the Roman empire in 44 AD
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Tifinagh
Tifinagh
Tifinagh
(Berber pronunciation: [tifinaɣ]; also written Tifinaɣ in the Berber Latin alphabet; Neo-Tifinagh: ⵜⵉⴼⵉⵏⴰⵖ; Tuareg Tifinagh: ⵜⵊⵉⵏⵗ or ⵜⵊⵏⵗ) is an abjad script used to write the Berber languages.[1] A modern alphabetical derivative of the traditional script, known as Neo-Tifinagh, was introduced in the 20th century
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Berber Latin Alphabet
The Berber Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
(Berber languages: Agemmay Amaziɣ Alatin) is the version of the Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
used to write the Berber languages. It was adopted in the 19th century, using varieties of letters
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic (Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Traditional Berber Religion
The traditional Berber religion is the ancient and native set of beliefs and deities adhered to by the Berber autochthones of North Africa. Many ancient Berber beliefs were developed locally, whereas others were influenced over time through contact with other traditional African religions (such as the Ancient Egyptian religion), or borrowed during antiquity from the Punic religion, Judaism, Iberian mythology, and the Hellenistic religion. The most recent influence came from Islam
Islam
and pre-Islamic Arab religion during the medieval period. Some of the ancient Berber beliefs still exist today subtly within the Berber popular culture and tradition
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Berbers And Islam
The Berbers
Berbers
(autonym: Imazighen) are an indigenous ethnic group of the Maghreb
Maghreb
region of North Africa. Following the Muslim
Muslim
conquest of the Maghreb, most Berber tribes eventually became Muslims, and today Arab-Berber
Arab-Berber
(of mixed Arab
Arab
and Berber ancestry) and Arabized Berbers ( Berbers
Berbers
who have assimilated into the Arab
Arab
population)[citation needed]. Presently, about one-sixth of the population of Maghreb speaks one of the Berber languages (mostly in Algeria and Morocco), but most of them also speak some form of Arabic.[1]Contents1 Background 2 Berbers
Berbers
in Al-Andalus 3 See also 4 ReferencesBackground[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources
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Banu Ifran
The Ifranids, also called Banu Ifran, Ifran, or the children of the Ifran (Arabic: بنو يفرن‎, Banu Yifran), were a Zenata
Zenata
Berber tribe prominent in the history of pre-Islamic and early Islamic North Africa.In the 8th century, they established a kingdom in Central Maghreb, Algeria
Algeria
with Tlemcen
Tlemcen
as its capital. The Banu Ifran
Banu Ifran
resisted or revolted against foreign occupiers—Romans, Vandals, and Byzantines—of their territory in Africa. In the seventh century, they sided with Kahina
Kahina
in her resistance against the Muslim Umayyad
Umayyad
invaders
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Maghrawa
The Maghrawa or Meghrawa (Berber: imeghrawen) were a large Zenata Berber tribe originating from what is now north of Morocco
Morocco
and Algeria to the mountainous Dahra region to western Algeria. They ruled these areas on behalf of the Umayyad Caliphate
Umayyad Caliphate
of Córdoba in the end of the 10th century and the first half of the 11th century.Contents1 History 2 Maghrawid leaders 3 See also 4 NotesHistory[edit] The Meghrawa, a tribe of Zanata
Zanata
Berbers,[1] were one of the first Berber tribes to submit to Islam
Islam
in the 7th century. They supported Uqba ibn Nafi
Uqba ibn Nafi
in his campaign to the Atlantic
Atlantic
in 683
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Chaoui People
The Chaoui people
Chaoui people
or Shawia (Algerian Arabic: شاويه‎, Tachawit: Išawiyen) are a Berber population inhabiting the Aurès, Batna and Khenchla
Khenchla
Oum bwaghi Biskra
Biskra
regions located in and surrounded by the Aurès
Aurès
Mountains. They also live in the Tébessa
Tébessa
area and other parts of eastern Algeria
Algeria
coextensive with ancient Numidia, as well as a few adjacent towns in Tunisia
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