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Mahendravarman I
Mahendravarma I (600–630 CE)[2] was a Pallava
Pallava
king who ruled the Northern regions of what forms present-day Tamil Nadu
Tamil Nadu
in India
India
in the early 7th century. He was the son of Simhavishnu, who defeated the Kalabhras
Kalabhras
and re-established the Pallava
Pallava
kingdom. During his reign, the Chalukya
Chalukya
king Pulakeshin II
Pulakeshin II
attacked the Pallava kingdom
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Kalabhras
The Kalabhra dynasty
Kalabhra dynasty
(Tamil: கல்புரை Kalpurai[1]) ruled over the entire ancient Tamil country between the 3rd and the 7th century in an era of South Indian history called the Kalabhra interregnum. The Kalabhras, possibly Jain, displaced the kingdoms of the early Cholas, early Pandyas and Chera dynasties by a revolt. Information about the origin and reign of the Kalabhras is scarce. They left neither artefacts nor monuments, and the only sources of information are scattered mentions in Sangam, Buddhist
Buddhist
and Jain literature. The Kalabhras were defeated by the joint efforts of the Pallavas, Pandyas and Chalukyas of Badami.Contents1 Identification 2 Evidence from literature 3 Reasons for the unpopularity 4 Patrons of literature 5 Religion 6 Fall of the Kalabhras 7 Further reading 8 Notes 9 ReferencesIdentification[edit] The origin and identity of the Kalabhras is uncertain
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Chola Dynasty
List of Chola
Chola
kings and emperorsEarly CholasEllalan Kulakkottan Ilamchetchenni Karikala Nedunkilli Nalankilli Killivalavan Kopperuncholan Kochchenganan PerunarkilliInterregnum (c. 200 – c. 848)Medieval CholasVijayalaya 848–891(?)Aditya I 891–907Parantaka I 907–950Gandaraditya 950–957Arinjaya 956–957Sundara (Parantaka II) 957–970Aditya II (co-regent)Uttama 970–985Rajaraja I 985–1014Rajendra I 1012–1044Rajadhiraja 1044–1054Rajendra II 1054–1063Virar
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Badami
Badami, formerly known as Vatapi, is a town and headquarters of a taluk by the same name, in the Bagalkot district
Bagalkot district
of Karnataka, India. It was the regal capital of the Badami Chalukyas
Badami Chalukyas
from 540 to 757 AD. It is famous for its rock cut structural temples. It is located in a ravine at the foot of a rugged, red sandstone outcrop that surrounds Agastya lake
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Sambandhar
Sambandar (also called Thirugyana Sambandar, Tirugnana Sambanthar, Campantar, Champantar, Jnanasambandar, Gnanasambandar) was a young Saiva poet-saint of Tamil Nadu who lived around the 7th century CE.[1] He is one of the most prominent of the sixty-three Nayanars, Tamil Saiva bhakti saints who lived between the sixth and the tenth centuries CE. Sambandar's hymns to Shiva were later collected to form the first three volumes of the Tirumurai, the religious canon of Tamil Saiva Siddhanta
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Vengi
The Vengi (or Venginadu) is a region spread over the mandals of Godavari and Krishna districts.[1][2] The capital city of Vengi is located at Pedavegi
Pedavegi
near Eluru. This area was part of Kalinga until that kingdom was conquered by Emperor Ashoka
Ashoka
of the Mauryan
Mauryan
Empire in the mid-3rd century BC. After the Mauryan
Mauryan
Empire collapsed in 185 BC, the region was dominated by the Satavahanas, who were succeeded in Vengi by the Andhra Ikshvakus. Around 300 AD, the Andhra Ikshvakus were replaced by the Salankayanas, who were vassals of the Pallavas
Pallavas
of Southern India
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Chalukya
The Chalukya
Chalukya
dynasty ([tʃaːɭukjə]) was an Indian royal dynasty that ruled large parts of southern and central India
India
between the 6th and the 12th centuries. During this period, they ruled as three related yet individual dynasties. The earliest dynasty, known as the " Badami
Badami
Chalukyas", ruled from Vatapi (modern Badami) from the middle of the 6th century. The Badami
Badami
Chalukyas
Chalukyas
began to assert their independence at the decline of the Kadamba kingdom of Banavasi
Banavasi
and rapidly rose to prominence during the reign of Pulakeshin II. After the death of Pulakeshin II, the Eastern Chalukyas
Eastern Chalukyas
became an independent kingdom in the eastern Deccan. They ruled from Vengi until about the 11th century
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Buddhist
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Aditya I
Aditya I
Aditya I
(c. 870 – c. 907 CE), the son of Vijayalaya, was the Chola king who extended the Chola
Chola
dominions by the conquest of the Pallavas and occupied the Western Ganga Kingdom.[1]Contents1 Pallava Civil War 2 Ascendancy 3 Invasion of the Pallava Country 4 The Conquest of Kongu 5 Relations with the Cheras 6 Aditya’s contributions to Temples 7 Death and Succession 8 ReferencesPallava Civil War[edit] During the invasion of the Chola
Chola
country, the Pandya king Varagunavarman II became an ally of Nripatunga, the eldest son of the Pallava King Nandivarman III. When Nandivarman died in 869 CE differences arose between Nripatunga and his stepbrother Aparajita, probably owing to the latter’s ambition to rule the kingdom on his own right. Both sides looked for allies
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Saivite
Shiva
Shiva
- ShaktiSadasiva Rudra Bhairava Parvati Durga KaliGanesha Murugan OthersScriptures and textsAgamas and TantrasVedas SvetasvataraTirumurai Shivasutras VachanasPhilosophyThree ComponentsPati Pashu PasamThree bondagesAnava Karma Maya 36 Tattvas YogaPracticesVibhuti Rudraksha Panchakshara Bilva Maha Shivaratri Yamas-Niyamas Guru-Linga-JangamSchoolsAdi MargamPashupata Kalamukha Kapalika
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Appar
Appar
Appar
Tirunavukkarasar
Tirunavukkarasar
Nayanar (Tamil: திருநாவுக்கரசர் Tirunāvukkaracar "King of the Tongue, Lord of Language"), also known as Navakkarasar and Appar
Appar
"Father", was a seventh-century Śaiva Tamil poet-saint, one of the most prominent of the sixty-three Nayanars. He was an older contemporary of Thirugnana Sambandar. His birth-name was Marulneekkiyar. He was called "father" by Sambandar, hence the name Appar.[1] Sundarar
Sundarar
states in his Tiruttondartokai that Appar
Appar
composed 4900 hymns of ten or eleven verses each. This statement is repeated by Nambiyandar Nambi and Sekkizhar, but only 313 hymns are known today.[2] These hymns are collected into the Tirumurai
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