HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Magnoliopsida
Magnoliopsida
Magnoliopsida
is a valid botanical name for a class of flowering plants
[...More...]

"Magnoliopsida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Liliidae
Liliidae is a botanical name at the rank of subclass. Circumscription of the subclass will vary with the taxonomic system being used (there are many such systems); the only requirement being that it includes the family Liliaceae.Contents1 Liliidae in Takhtajan system 2 Liliidae in Cronquist system 3 Liliidae in Dahlgren and Thorne systems3.1 Dahlgren (1985) 3.2 Thorne (1992)4 Liliidae in APG II system Liliidae in Takhtajan system[edit] The Takhtajan system treats this as one of six subclasses within class Liliopsida (= monocotyledons)
[...More...]

"Liliidae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Asteridae
Asteridae is an obsolete botanical name at the rank of subclass. Composition of the subclass has also varied; however, by definition it always includes the family Asteraceae
Asteraceae
(Compositae)
[...More...]

"Asteridae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rosids
The rosids are members of a large clade (monophyletic group) of flowering plants, containing about 70,000 species,[2] more than a quarter of all angiosperms.[3] The clade is divided into 16 to 20 orders, depending upon circumscription and classification. These orders, in turn, together comprise about 140 families.[4] Fossil rosids are known from the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period. Molecular clock estimates indicate that the rosids originated in the Aptian
Aptian
or Albian stages of the Cretaceous, between 125 and 99.6 million years ago.[5][6]Contents1 Name 2 Relationships 3 Classification3.1 Orders4 Phylogeny 5 References 6 External linksName[edit] The name is based upon the name "Rosidae", which had usually been understood to be a subclass
[...More...]

"Rosids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

APG II System
The APG II system
APG II system
( Angiosperm Phylogeny Group II system) of plant classification is the second, now obsolete, version of a modern, mostly molecular-based, system of plant taxonomy that was published in April 2003 by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group.[1] It was a revision of the first APG system, published in 1998, and was superseded in 2009 by a further revision, the APG III system. History[edit] APG II was published as: Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (2003). "An update of the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants: APG II". Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 141(4): 399-436
[...More...]

"APG II System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

APG System
The APG system ( Angiosperm Phylogeny Group system) of plant classification is the first version of a modern, mostly molecular-based, system of plant taxonomy
[...More...]

"APG System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Clade
A clade (from Ancient Greek: κλάδος, klados, "branch") is a group of organisms that consists of a common ancestor and all its lineal descendants, and represents a single "branch" on the "tree of life".[1] The common ancestor may be an individual, a population, a species (extinct or extant), and so on right up to a kingdom and further. Clades are nested, one in another, as each branch in turn splits into smaller branches. These splits reflect evolutionary history as populations diverged and evolved independently. Clades are termed monophyletic (Greek: "one clan") groups. Over the last few decades, the cladistic approach has revolutionized biological classification and revealed surprising evolutionary relationships among organisms.[2] Increasingly, taxonomists try to avoid naming taxa that are not clades; that is, taxa that are not monophyletic
[...More...]

"Clade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Class (biology)
In biological classification, class (Latin: classis) is:a taxonomic rank. Other well-known ranks in descending order of size are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, order, family, genus, and species, with class fitting between phylum and order. As for the other well-known ranks, there is the option of an immediately lower rank, indicated by the prefix sub-: subclass (Latin: subclassis). a taxonomic unit, a taxon, in that rank. In that case the plural is classes (Latin classes)Example: Dogs are in the class Mammalia.The composition of each class is determined by a taxonomist. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists taking different positions. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing a class, but for well-known animals there is likely to be consensus. In botany, classes are now rarely discussed
[...More...]

"Class (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wikispecies
Wikispecies
Wikispecies
is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation. Its aim is to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species; the project is directed at scientists, rather than at the general public
[...More...]

"Wikispecies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
[...More...]

"Wikidata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Encyclopedia Of Life
The Encyclopedia of Life
Life
(EOL) is a free, online collaborative encyclopedia intended to document all of the 1.9 million living species known to science. It is compiled from existing databases and from contributions by experts and non-experts throughout the world.[2] It aims to build one "infinitely expandable" page for each species, including video, sound, images, graphics, as well as text.[3] In addition, the Encyclopedia incorporates content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which digitizes millions of pages of printed literature from the world's major natural history libraries. The project was initially backed by a US$50 million funding commitment, led by the MacArthur Foundation
MacArthur Foundation
and the Sloan Foundation, who provided US$20 million and US$5 million, respectively
[...More...]

"Encyclopedia Of Life" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hamamelidae
Hamamelididae is an obsolete botanical name at the rank of subclass. Because some hamamelidid members are bearing aments (i.e., catkins), this suclass has been formerly known as Amentiferae. Based on molecular phylogeny works, Hamamelididae appears to be a polyphyletic group.[1] [2] A well-known system that used the name Hamamelididae is the Cronquist system, although in the disallowed spelling Hamamelidae. In the original 1981 version of this system the circumscription was:subclass Hamamelidaeorder Trochodendrales order Hamamelidales order Daphniphyllales order Didymelales order Eucommiales order Urticales order Leitneriales order Juglandales order Myricales order Fagales order CasuarinalesAs is true for any botanical name, circumscription of the subclass will vary with the taxonomic system being used; the only requirement being that it includes the family Hamamelidaceae
[...More...]

"Hamamelidae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lamiidae
The Lamiales are an order in the asterid group of dicotyledonous flowering plants. It includes about 23,810[1] species, 1,059 genera, and is divided into about 24 families. Well-known or economically important members of this order include lavender, lilac, olive, jasmine, the ash tree, teak, snapdragon, sesame, psyllium, garden sage, and a number of table herbs such as mint, basil, and rosemary.Contents1 Description 2 Taxonomy 3 Dating 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] Although exceptions occur, species in this order typically have the following characteristics:superior ovary composed of two fused carpels four petals fused into a tube bilaterally symmetrical, often bilabiate corollas four (or fewer) fertile stamensTaxonomy[edit] The Lamiales previously had a restricted circumscription (e.g., by Arthur Cronquist) that included the major families Lamiaceae (Labiatae), Verbenaceae, and Boraginaceae, plus a few smaller families
[...More...]

"Lamiidae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rosidae
Under the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICN), Rosidae is a botanical name at the rank of subclass. Circumscription of the subclass will vary with the taxonomic system being used; the only requirement being that it includes the family Rosaceae. Under Phylocode, Rosidae is a clade defined as the most inclusive crown clade containing Rosa cinnamomea,[1] but not Berberidopsis corallina nor Dillenia indica
Dillenia indica
nor Gunnera manicata
Gunnera manicata
nor Helianthus annuus nor Saxifraga mertensiana
Saxifraga mertensiana
nor Stellaria media
Stellaria media
nor Viscum album.[2] A well-known example of Rosidae as governed by the ICN was in the Cronquist system
[...More...]

"Rosidae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eudicots
The eudicots, Eudicotidae or eudicotyledons are a clade of flowering plants that had been called tricolpates or non-magnoliid dicots by previous authors. The botanical terms were introduced in 1991 by evolutionary botanist James A. Doyle and paleobotanist Carol L. Hotton to emphasize the later evolutionary divergence of tricolpate dicots from earlier, less specialized, dicots.[1] The close relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains was initially seen in morphological studies of shared derived characters. These plants have a distinct trait in their pollen grains of exhibiting three colpi or grooves paralleling the polar axis. Later molecular evidence confirmed the genetic basis for the evolutionary relationships among flowering plants with tricolpate pollen grains and dicotyledonous traits. The term means "true dicotyledons", as it contains the majority of plants that have been considered dicots and have characteristics of the dicots
[...More...]

"Eudicots" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dilleniidae
Dillenidae is a botanical name at the rank of subclass. Circumscription of the subclass will vary with the taxonomic system being used; the only requirement being that it includes the family Dilleniaceae. A well-known system that uses this name is the Cronquist system, and in the original 1981 version of the system the circumscription was:subclass Dilleniidaeorder Dilleniales order Theales order Malvales order Lecythidales order Nepenthales order Violales order Salicales order Capparales order Batales order Ericales order Diapensiales order Ebenales order PrimulalesRecent molecular systematic studies have shown that this group is polyphyletic
[...More...]

"Dilleniidae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.