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Magi
Magi
Magi
(/ˈmeɪdʒaɪ/; singular magus /ˈmeɪɡəs/; from Latin
Latin
magus) denotes followers of Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism
or Zoroaster. The earliest known use of the word Magi
Magi
is in the trilingual inscription written by Darius the Great, known as the Behistun Inscription. Old Persian texts, pre-dating the Hellenistic period, refer to a Magus as a Zurvanic, and presumably Zoroastrian, priest. Pervasive throughout the Eastern Mediterranean and Western Asia
Western Asia
until late antiquity and beyond, mágos, "magician", was influenced by (and eventually displaced) Greek goēs (γόης), the older word for a practitioner of magic, to include astrology, alchemy and other forms of esoteric knowledge
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Western Asia
Western Asia, West Asia, Southwestern Asia
Asia
or Southwest Asia
Asia
is the westernmost subregion of Asia. The concept is in limited use, as it significantly overlaps with the Middle East
Middle East
(or the Near East), the main difference usually being the exclusion of the majority of Egypt (which would be counted as part of North Africa) and the inclusion of the Caucasus. The term is sometimes used for the purposes of grouping countries in statistics. The total population of Western Asia
Asia
is an estimated 300 million as of 2015. In an unrelated context, the term is also used in ancient history and archaeology to divide the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
into the "Asiatic" or "Western Asian" cultures as opposed to ancient Egypt
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Zoroastrian Wedding
Zoroastrian weddings are a religious ceremony in Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism
in which two individuals, a man and a woman are united. In Zoroastrianism, marriage within the community is encouraged, and is greatly favored in religious texts. Contents1 Prior to ceremony1.1 Age 1.2 Arranged marriages2 Ceremony2.1 Prior to the marriage2.1.1 Adrâvvûn 2.1.2 Madasoro 2.1.3 Divô 2.1.4 Âdarni2.2 The marriage3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 BooksPrior to ceremony[edit] Age[edit] In the Avesta, manhood and womanhood are gained at the age of 15, when they would be ready for marriage. However, in India, the threshold for marriage is set by the Parsi
Parsi
Marriage
Marriage
and Divorce ct, 1936 which states the threshold at 21 for males and 18 for females
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Book Of Arda Viraf
The Book of Ardā Wīrāz ( Middle Persian
Middle Persian
Ardā Wīrāz nāmag, ardaː wiːraːz naːmag, sometimes called the "Arda Wiraf") is a Zoroastrian religious text of the Sasanian era written in Middle Persian. It contains about 8,800 words.[1] It describes the dream-journey of a devout Zoroastrian (the Wīrāz of the story) through the next world. The text assumed its definitive form in the 9th-10th centuries after a long series of emendations.[2]Contents1 Title 2 Textual History 3 Plot summary 4 Quotes from the Text 5 See also 6 References 7 External links 8 Further readingTitle[edit] The full title is Ardā Wīrāz nāmag, "Book of the Just Wīrāz". Due to the ambiguity inherent to Pahlavi scripts, Wīrāz, the name of the protagonist, may also be transliterated as Wiraf or Viraf, but the Avestan
Avestan
form is clearly Virāza, suggesting the correct reading is z.[3][4] The Ardā of the name (cf. aša, cognate with Skt
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Jamasp Namag
The Jamasp Nameh[pronunciation?] (var: Jāmāsp Nāmag, Jāmāsp Nāmeh, "Story of Jamasp") is a Middle Persian
Middle Persian
book of revelations. In an extended sense, it is also a primary source on Zoroastrian
Zoroastrian
doctrine and legend. The work is also known as the Ayādgār ī Jāmāspīg or Ayātkār-ī Jāmāspīk, meaning "[In] Memoriam of Jamasp". The text takes the form of a series of questions and answers between Vishtasp and Jamasp, both of whom were amongst Zoroaster's immediate and closest disciples. Vishtasp was the princely protector and patron of Zoroaster
Zoroaster
while Jamasp was a nobleman at Vishtasp's court. Both are figures mentioned in the Gathas, the oldest hymns of Zoroastrianism and believed to have been composed by Zoroaster
Zoroaster
himself
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Qissa-i Sanjan
The Story of Sanjan (also Qissa-i Sanjan or Kisse-i Sanjan) (Persian: قصه سنجان‎, Gujarati: કિસે સનજાન/કિસ્સા-એ-સંજાણ) is an account of the early years of Zoroastrian settlers on the Indian subcontinent. In the absence of alternatives, the text is generally accepted to be the only narrative of the events described therein, and many members of the Parsi
Parsi
community perceive the epic poem to be an accurate account of their ancestors. The account begins in Greater Khorasan, and narrates the travel of the emigrants to Gujarat, on the west coast of present-day India. The first chapter, which is the longest, ends with the establishment of a Fire Temple at Sanjan (Gujarat), and the later dispersion of their descendants. In later chapters, the Qissa narrates the success in repelling Islamic invaders, then the failure in the same, and the subsequent flight of the Zoroastrians
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Chinvat Bridge
The Chinvat Bridge
Bridge
[ʧinva:t] (Avestan Cinvatô Peretûm, "bridge of judgement" or "beam-shaped bridge")[1] or the Bridge
Bridge
of the Requiter[2] in Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism
is the sifting bridge[3] which separates the world of the living from the world of the dead. All souls must cross the bridge upon death. The bridge is guarded by two four-eyed dogs. A related myth is that of Yama, the Hindu ruler of Hell
Hell
who watches the gates of Hell
Hell
with his two four-eyed dogs. The Bridge's appearance varies depending on the observer's asha, or righteousness
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Zoroastrian Cosmology
Zoroastrian cosmology is divided in four periods of 3,000 years. Zoroaster
Zoroaster
was born in the beginning of the fourth period, to be succeeded at the end of each next millennium by a new saviour. When Saoshyant, the third and last saviour would come the last judgment and the creation of a new world.[1] Creation of the universe[edit] Main article: Zoroastrianism According to the Zoroastrian story of creation, Ahura Mazda
Ahura Mazda
existed in light and goodness above, while Angra Mainyu
Angra Mainyu
existed in darkness and ignorance below. They have existed independently of each other for all time, and manifest contrary substances. Ahura Mazda
Ahura Mazda
first created seven abstract heavenly beings called Amesha Spentas, who support him and represent beneficent aspects, along with numerous yazads, lesser beings worthy of worship
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Mazdak
Part of a series on Nizari-Ismāʿīli Batiniyya, Hurufiyya, Kaysanites and Twelver
Twelver
Shī‘ismAlevismBeliefsAllah Quran Haqq–Muhammad–Ali Prophet Muḥammad ibn `Abd Allāh Muhammad-Ali Islamic prophet Zahir Batin Buyruks Tariqat Haqiqa Marifat Wahdat al-wujud Wahdat al-mawjud Baqaa Fana Haal Ihsan Kashf Nafs Keramat Al-Insān al-Kāmil Lataif Four Doors Manzil Nûr Sulook Yaqeen Devriye Poetry Cosmology Philosophy PsychologyPracticesZakat Zeyārat Taqiyya Ashura Hıdırellez Nowruz Saya Mawlid Music Düşkünlük Meydanı Fasting MüsahiplikThe Twelve ImamsAli Hasan Husayn al-Abidin al-Baqir a
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Zoroastrian Calendar
This article treats the reckoning of days, months and years in the calendar used by adherents of the Zoroastrian
Zoroastrian
faith. Zoroastrian religious festivals are discussed elsewhere, but have a fixed relationship to Nawruz, the New Year festival, whose timing is discussed below
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Zoroastrian Festivals
Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism
has numerous festivals and holy days, all of which are bound to the Zoroastrian calendar. The Shahenshahi and Kadmi variants of the calendar do not intercalate leap years and hence the day of the Gregorian calendar year on which these days are celebrated shifts ahead with time. The third variant of the Zoroastrian calendar, known as either Fasli (in India) or Bastani (in Iran), intercalcates according to Gregorian calendar rules and thus remains synchronous with the seasons. For details on the differences, see Zoroastrian calendar.Contents1 Seasonal festivals 2 Name-day feasts 3 Other holy days 4 References 5 External linksSeasonal festivals[edit] Six irregularly-spaced seasonal festivals, called gahanbars (meaning "proper season"), are celebrated during the religious year
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Frashokereti
— Events —Death Resurrection Last JudgementJewishMessianismBook of Daniel KabbalahTaoistLi HongZoroastrianFrashokereti SaoshyantInter-religiousEnd times Apocalypticism2012 phenomenonMillenarianism Last Judgment Resurrection
Resurrection
of the deadGog and Magog Messianic Agev t ePart of a series onZoroastrianism
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101 Names Of God
In Zoroastrianism, 101 names of God ( Pazand
Pazand
Sad-o-yak nam-i-khoda) is a list of names of God (Ahura Mazda). The list is preserved in Persian, Pazand
Pazand
and Gujarati
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Zoroastrianism In India
Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism
in India has significant history within the country. Zoroastrians have lived in India since the Sasanian period.[1] The Zoroastrians also moved to India in successive migrations during the Islamic period. The initial migration following the Muslim conquest of Persia
Persia
has been canonized as a religious persecution by invading Muslims. Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism
meanwhile suffered a decline in Iran
Iran
after the conquests
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Parsi
ZoroastrianismPart of a series onZoroastrianism Atar
Atar
(fire), a primary symbol of ZoroastrianismPrimary topics Ahura Mazda Zarathustra aša (asha) / arta Persia/Iran FaravaharAngels and demonsAmesha Spentas Yazatas Ahuras Daevas Angra MainyuScripture and worshipAvesta Gathas Yasna Vendidad Visperad Yashts Khordeh Avesta Ab-Zohr The Ahuna Vairya
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Zoroastrianism In The United States
This article focuses on Zoroastrianism in the United States. Overview[edit] The oldest fire temple in the United States was one purchased by Arbab Rustam Guiv in New Rochelle. The most notable fire temple in the United States is the Dar-e-Mehr temple located in Pomona, New York. It was purchased in 2001 and subsequently purpose-built with Zoroastriasn tenets and then inaugurated in April 2016.[1] Demographics[edit] In 2006, The United States had the world's third-largest Zoroastrian population at six thousand adherents.[2] Based on mailing addresses rather than congregations, there are two U.S. counties where Zoroastrians constitute the second-largest religion after Christianity
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