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Sun Of May
The Sun of May (Spanish: Sol de Mayo) is a national emblem of Argentina and Uruguay, and appears on the flags of both countries. According to Diego Abad de Santillán, the Sun of May represents Inti, the Incan god of the sun.[1] The Sun of May is also connected to Sol Invictus ("The Unconquered Sun"), a Roman god identified with the Sun (the main solar deity in the ancient Roman religion). This links it to the god Mitra Sol Invictus, a solar god whose worship the Roman emperor Aurelian made official throughout the Roman Empire. The specification "of May" is a reference to the May Revolution which took place in the week from 18 to 25 May 1810, which marked the beginning of the independence from the Spanish Empire for the countries that were then part of the Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata
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Flag Of Argentina
The flag of Argentina is a triband, composed of three equally wide horizontal bands coloured light blue and white. There are multiple interpretations on the reasons for those colors. The flag was created by Manuel Belgrano, in line with the creation of the Cockade of Argentina, and was first raised at the city of Rosario on February 27, 1812, during the Argentine War of Independence. The National Flag Memorial was later built on the site. The First Triumvirate did not approve the use of the flag, but the Asamblea del Año XIII allowed the use of the flag as a war flag. It was the Congress of Tucumán which finally designated it as the national flag, in 1816. A yellow Sun of May was added to the center in 1818, according to Diego Abad de Santillán, the sun represents the Inca god of the sun Inti.[1] The full flag featuring the sun is called the Official Ceremonial Flag (Spanish: Bandera Oficial de Ceremonia)
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Diario Democracia
Diario Democracia is a Spanish Language daily newspaper published from Junin, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. It was founded in October 1931 by Moses Lebensohn.[1][2]

Ámbito Financiero
Ámbito Financiero is an
Argentine newspaper founded on December 9, 1976 by economist Julio A. Ramos. It was initially sold in downtown Buenos Aires, covering mainly the daily prices of the U.S. dollar, gold, stocks, etc., and included other editorials. The newspaper became successful, making it a reliable source of reference to investors and operators of the city. Ámbito Financiero was acquired by Orlando Vignatti in 2008
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Spanish Language

Thus, the Spanish alphabet has the following 27 letters: Since 2010, none of the digraphs (ch, ll, rr, gu, qu) is considered a letter by the Spanish Royal Academy.[242] The letters k and w are used only in words and namesThe letters k and w are used only in words and names coming from foreign languages (kilo, folklore, whisky, kiwi, etc.). With the exclusion of a very small number of regional terms such as México (see Toponymy of Mexico), pronunciation can be entirely determined from spelling. Under the orthographic conventions, a typical Spanish word is stressed on the syllable before the last if it ends with a vowel (not including ⟨y⟩) or with a vowel followed by ⟨n⟩ or an ⟨s⟩; it is stressed on the last syllable otherwise
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