HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Linen
Linen
Linen
/ˈlɪnɪn/ is a textile made from the fibers of the flax plant. Linen
Linen
is laborious to manufacture, but the fiber is very absorbent and garments made of linen are valued for their exceptional coolness and freshness in hot weather. Many products are made of linen: aprons, bags, towels (swimming, bath, beach, body and wash towels), napkins, bed linens, tablecloths, runners, chair covers, and men's and women's wear. The word linen is of West Germanic origin and cognate to the Latin name for the flax plant, linum, and the earlier Greek λινόν (linón). This word history has given rise to a number of other terms in English, most notably line, from the use of a linen (flax) thread to determine a straight line.[1] Textiles in a linen weave texture, even when made of cotton, hemp and other non-flax fibers, are also loosely referred to as "linen"
[...More...]

"Linen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ramses II
Ramesses II
Ramesses II
/ˈræməsiːz, ˈræmsiːz, ˈræmziːz/ (variously spelled also Rameses[5] or Ramses;[6] born c. 1303 BC; died July or August 1213 BC; reigned 1279–1213[7] BC), also known as Ramesses the Great, was the third pharaoh of the 19th Dynasty of Egypt. He is often regarded as the greatest, most celebrated, and most powerful pharaoh of the Egyptian Empire.[8] His successors and later Egyptians called him the "Great Ancestor". He is known as Ozymandias in the Greek sources,[9] from a transliteration into Greek of a part of Ramesses' throne name, Usermaatre Setepenre, "The justice of
is powerful—chosen of Rê".[10] Ramesses II
Ramesses II
led several military expeditions into the Levant, reasserting Egyptian control over Canaan. He also led expeditions to the south, into Nubia, commemorated in inscriptions at Beit el-Wali and Gerf Hussein
[...More...]

"Ramses II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tammuz (deity)
Dumuzid[a] later known by the alternate form Tammuz,[b] was the ancient Mesopotamian god of shepherds, who was also the primary consort of the goddess Inanna
Inanna
(later known as Ishtar). In Sumerian mythology, Dumuzid's sister was Geshtinanna, the goddess of vegetation. In the Sumerian King List, Dumuzid
Dumuzid
is listed as an antediluvian king of the city of Bad-tibira
Bad-tibira
and also an early king of the city of Uruk. In the Sumerian poem Inanna
Inanna
Prefers the Farmer, Dumuzid
Dumuzid
competes against the farmer Enkimdu
Enkimdu
for Inanna's hand in marriage. In Inanna's Descent into the Underworld, Dumuzid
Dumuzid
fails to mourn Inanna's death and, when she returns from the Underworld, she allows the galla demons to drag him down to the Underworld as her replacement
[...More...]

"Tammuz (deity)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Staple (textiles)
Staple refers to fibre of discrete length and may be of any composition. A continuous fibre such as natural silk or synthetic is known as filament rather than staple fibre.Contents1 Etymology 2 Staple length 3 Filament 4 Wool 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] Back-formation arising because part of the business of a wool-stapler was to sort and class the wool according to quality. According to Chambers Dictionary the actual word "staple" including staple foods and other products comes from the Low German
Low German
word Stapel meaning a heap of goods to be sold.[1] Staple length[edit]Magnified fibres of silk, wool, and cottonStaple length, a property of staple fibre, is a term referring to the average length of a group of fibres of any composition. Staple length depends on the origin of the fibres
[...More...]

"Staple (textiles)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lining (sewing)
In sewing and tailoring, a lining is an inner layer of fabric, fur, or other material inserted into clothing, hats, luggage, curtains, handbags and similar items. Linings provide a neat inside finish and conceal interfacing, padding, the raw edges of seams, and other construction details. A lining reduces the wearing strain on clothing, extending the useful life of the lined garment. A smooth lining allows a coat or jacket to slip on over other clothing easily, and linings add warmth to cold-weather wear.[1][2] Linings are typically made of solid colors to coordinate with the garment fabric, but patterned and contrasting-colored linings are also used
[...More...]

"Lining (sewing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Linseed Oil
Linseed oil, also known as flaxseed oil or flax oil, is a colourless to yellowish oil obtained from the dried, ripened seeds of the flax plant (Linum usitatissimum). The oil is obtained by pressing, sometimes followed by solvent extraction. Linseed oil
Linseed oil
is a drying oil, meaning it can polymerize into a solid form. Due to its polymer-forming properties, linseed oil can be used on its own or blended with combinations of other oils, resins or solvents as an impregnator, drying oil finish or varnish in wood finishing, as a pigment binder in oil paints, as a plasticizer and hardener in putty, and in the manufacture of linoleum
[...More...]

"Linseed Oil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Linoleum
Linoleum, also called Lino, is a floor covering made from materials such as solidified linseed oil (linoxyn), pine rosin, ground cork dust, wood flour, and mineral fillers such as calcium carbonate, most commonly on a burlap or canvas backing. Pigments are often added to the materials to create the desired colour finish. The finest linoleum floors, known as "inlaid", are extremely durable, and were made by joining and inlaying solid pieces of linoleum. Cheaper patterned linoleum came in different grades or gauges, and were printed with thinner layers which were more prone to wear and tear. High quality linoleum is flexible and thus can be used in buildings where a more rigid material (such as ceramic tile) would crack.Contents1 History1.1 Loss of trademark protection2 Use 3 Present day 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Early linoleum at Tyntesfield. Linoleum
Linoleum
was invented by Englishman Frederick Walton
[...More...]

"Linoleum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
is a historical region in West Asia
West Asia
situated within the Tigris– Euphrates
Euphrates
river system, in modern days roughly corresponding to most of Iraq, Kuwait, parts of Northern Saudi Arabia, the eastern parts of Syria, Southeastern Turkey, and regions along the Turkish–Syrian and Iran– Iraq
Iraq
borders.[1] The Sumerians and Akkadians
Akkadians
(including Assyrians and Babylonians) dominated Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the beginning of written history (c. 3100 BC) to the fall of Babylon
Babylon
in 539 BC, when it was conquered by the Achaemenid Empire
[...More...]

"Mesopotamia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inanna
Inanna
Inanna
(/ɪˈnɑːnə/; Sumerian: 𒀭𒈹 Dinanna)[4] was the ancient Sumerian goddess of love, beauty, sex, desire, fertility, war, combat, justice, and political power. She was later worshipped by the Akkadians, Babylonians, and Assyrians under the name Ishtar (/ˈɪʃtɑːr/; Dištar).[4] She was known as the "Queen of Heaven" and was the patron goddess of the Eanna
Eanna
temple at the city of Uruk, which was her main cult center. She was associated with the planet Venus
Venus
and her most prominent symbols included the lion and the eight-pointed star
[...More...]

"Inanna" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Samuel Noah Kramer
Samuel Noah Kramer
Samuel Noah Kramer
(September 28, 1897 – November 26, 1990) was one of the world's leading Assyriologists and a world-renowned expert in Sumerian history and Sumerian language.Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 Selected writings 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksBiography[edit] Kramer was born on September 28, 1897 in Zhashkiv
Zhashkiv
near Uman
Uman
in the Kiev Governorate, Russian Empire
Russian Empire
(modern day Ukraine), the son of Benjamin and Yetta Kramer. In 1905 as a result of the anti-Semitic pogroms under Czar
Czar
Nicholas II
Nicholas II
of Russia, his family emigrated to Philadelphia, where his father established a Hebrew school
[...More...]

"Samuel Noah Kramer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shirt
A shirt is a cloth garment for the upper body (from the neck to the waist). Originally an undergarment worn exclusively by men, it has become, in American English, a catch-all term for a broad variety of upper-body garments and undergarments. In British English, a shirt is more specifically a garment with a collar, sleeves with cuffs, and a full vertical opening with buttons or snaps (North Americans would call that a "dress shirt", a specific type of "collared shirt"). A shirt can also be worn with a necktie under the shirt collar.Contents1 History 2 Types 3 Parts of shirt3.1 Shoulders and arms3.1.1 Sleeves 3.1.2 Cuffs3.2 Lower hem 3.3 Body 3.4 Neck 3.5 Other features4 Types of fabric 5 Shirts and politics 6 Industrial production 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] The World's Oldest preserved garment, discovered by Flinders Petrie, is a "highly sophisticated" linen shirt from a First Dynasty Egyptian tomb at Tarkan, c
[...More...]

"Shirt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Diane Wolkstein
Diane Wolkstein (November 11, 1942 – January 31, 2013) was a folklorist and author of children's books. She also served as New York City's official storyteller from 1968–1971.[1] As New York's official storyteller, Wolkstein visited two of the city's parks each weekday, staging hundreds of one-woman storytelling events.[1] After successfully talking her way into the position, she realized "there was no margin for error," she said in a 1992 interview. "I mean, it was a park. [The children would] just go somewhere else if they didn't like it."[1] She also had a radio show on WNYC, Stories From Many Lands, from 1968 until 1980, and she helped create the Storytelling Center of New York City.[1] Wolkstein authored two dozen books, primarily collections of folk tales and legends she gathered during research trips
[...More...]

"Diane Wolkstein" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Utu
Utu[a] later worshipped by East Semitic peoples as Shamash,[b] was the ancient Mesopotamian god of the sun, justice, morality, and truth, and the twin brother of the goddess Inanna, the Queen of Heaven. His main temples were in the cities of Sippar
Sippar
and Larsa. He was believed to ride through the heavens in his sun chariot and see all things that happened in the day. He was the enforcer of divine justice and was thought to aid those in distress
[...More...]

"Utu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plutarch
Plutarch
Plutarch
(/ˈpluːtɑːrk/; Greek: Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: [plǔːtarkʰos]; c. CE 46 – CE 120),[1] later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος)[a] was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
and Moralia.[2] He is classified[3] as a Middle Platonist
[...More...]

"Plutarch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isis
Isis
Isis
was a major goddess in ancient Egyptian religion whose worship spread throughout the Greco-Roman world. Isis
Isis
was first mentioned in the Old Kingdom
Old Kingdom
(c. 2686–2181 BCE) as one of the main characters of the Osiris
Osiris
myth, in which she resurrects her slain husband, the divine king Osiris, and produces and protects his heir, Horus. She was believed to help the dead enter the afterlife as she had helped Osiris, and she was considered the divine mother of the pharaoh, who was likened to Horus. Her maternal aid was invoked in healing spells to benefit ordinary people. Originally, she played a limited role in royal rituals and temple rites, although she was more prominent in funerary practices and magical texts. In the first millennium BCE, Osiris
Osiris
and Isis
Isis
became the most widely worshipped of Egyptian deities
[...More...]

"Isis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ulster
Patron Saints: Finnian of Moville[1] Columba a. ^ The Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency[2] for 2011 combined with the preliminary results of Census of Ireland 2011 for Ulster (part of).[3] b. ^ Ulster contains all of the Northern Ireland constituency (3 MEPs) as well as part of the Midlands–North-West constituency (4 MEPs); the counties of Cavan, Monaghan and Donegal contain 17.5% of the population of this constituency.[4]Ulster (/ˈʌlstər/; Irish: Ulaidh pronounced [ˈul̪ˠəi] or Cúige Uladh pronounced [ˈkuːɟə ˈul̪ˠə], Ulster Scots: Ulstèr[5][6][7] or Ulster)[8][9][10] is a former province in the north of the island of Ireland. It was made up of nine counties, six of which are in Northern Ireland (a part of the United Kingdom) and three of which are in the Republic of Ireland. It is the second largest (after Munster) and second most populous (after Leinster) of Ireland's four provinces, with Belfast being its biggest city
[...More...]

"Ulster" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.