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Leon Edel
Joseph Leon Edel
Leon Edel
(9 September 1907 – 5 September 1997) was a North American literary critic and biographer. He was the elder brother of North American philosopher Abraham Edel.[1][2] The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
calls Edel "the foremost 20th-century authority on the life and works of Henry James."[3] His work on James won him both a National Book Award and a Pulitzer Prize.[4]Contents1 Life and career 2 Selected bibliography 3 Reviews 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Edel was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the son of Fannie (Malamud) and Simon Edel.[5] Edel grew up in Yorkton, Saskatchewan. He attended McGill University
McGill University
and the Université de Paris. While at the former he was associated with the Montreal Group of modernist writers, which included F.R. Scott and A.J.M
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Literary Critic
Literary criticism
Literary criticism
(or literary studies) is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often influenced by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of literature's goals and methods. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely from book reviewing, is a matter of some controversy. For example, the Johns Hopkins Guide to Literary Theory and Criticism[1] draws no distinction between literary theory and literary criticism, and almost always uses the terms together to describe the same concept
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Sir George Williams University
Sir George Williams University
University
is a former university that was located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It merged with Loyola College to create Concordia University
University
on August 24, 1974.Contents1 History1.1 Sir George Williams Computer lab occupation2 Sir George Williams Georgians 3 Principals 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Sir George Williams University's Henry F. Hall Building
Henry F. Hall Building
in 1970.In 1851, the first YMCA
YMCA
in North America was established on Ste-Helene street in Old Montreal.[1] Beginning in 1873, the YMCA
YMCA
offered evening classes to allow working people in the English-speaking community to pursue their education while working during the day. Sixty years later, the Montreal
Montreal
YMCA
YMCA
relocated to its current location on Stanley Street in Downtown Montreal
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National Book Foundation
Foundation
Foundation
may refer to:Contents1 Arts and entertainment1.1 Literature 1.2 Music 1.3 Television2 Education 3 Organizations 4 Science and technology 5 Other uses 6 See alsoArts and entertainment[edit] Literature[edit] Foundation
Foundation
series, a series of science fiction books by Isaac Asimov Foundation
Foundation
(Isaac Asimov novel), the first book in the series The Foundation
Foundation
Trilogy (BBC Radio), a radio adaption of the series Foundation
Foundation
– The International Review of Science Fiction, a literary journal Foundation
Foundation
(b-boy book), by Joseph G
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The New Yorker
The New Yorker
The New Yorker
is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. It is published by Condé Nast. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Hendrik Christian Andersen
Hendrik Christian Andersen
Hendrik Christian Andersen
(April 15, 1872 in Bergen
Bergen
– December 19, 1940 in Rome) was a Norwegian-American
Norwegian-American
sculptor, painter and urban planner.Contents1 Background 2 The World City 3 Relationship with Henry James 4 Museo Hendrik Christian Andersen 5 Burial 6 ReferencesBackground[edit] Andersen was born in Bergen, Norway, of parents Anders Andersen from Lærdal and Helene Monsine Monsen from Bergen. He emigrated as an infant with his family to Newport, Rhode Island
Newport, Rhode Island
the following year. As a young man in Newport, Andersen began his work as a sculptor and learned to mingle among the city’s wealthy elite, including serving as an art instructor for Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney.[1] In 1893, Andersen traveled to Europe to study art and eventually settled in Rome
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Constance Fenimore Woolson
Constance Fenimore Woolson
Constance Fenimore Woolson
(March 5, 1840 – January 24, 1894) was an American novelist, poet, and short story writer. She was a grandniece of James Fenimore Cooper, and is best known for fictions about the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
region, the American South, and American expatriates in Europe.Contents1 Life and writings1.1 In America: the story-writer 1.2 In Europe: the novelist2 Selected works2.1 Novels 2.2 Short Stories 2.3 Poetry 2.4 Travel writing and nonfiction3 Critical reception 4 Woolson's friendship with Henry James 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLife and writings[edit] In America: the story-writer[edit] Woolson was born in Claremont, New Hampshire, but her family soon moved to Cleveland, Ohio, after the deaths of three of her sisters from scarlet fever.[2] Woolson was educated at the Cleveland Female Seminary and a boarding school in New York
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Biographer
Biographers are authors who write an account of another person's life, while autobiographers are authors who write their own biography. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
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Literary Biography
When studying literature, biography and its relationship to literature is often a subject of literary criticism, and is treated in several different forms. Two scholarly approaches use biography or biographical approaches to the past as a tool for interpreting literature: literary biography and biographical criticism. Additionally, two genres of fiction rely heavily on the incorporation of biographical elements into their content, biographical fiction and autobiographical fiction.Contents1 Literary biography 2 Biographical criticism 3 Biographical fiction 4 Autobiographical fiction 5 References5.1 Works cited6 Further readingLiterary biography[edit] A literary biography is the biographical exploration of the lives of writers and artists
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Biography In Literature
When studying literature, biography and its relationship to literature is often a subject of literary criticism, and is treated in several different forms. Two scholarly approaches use biography or biographical approaches to the past as a tool for interpreting literature: literary biography and biographical criticism. Additionally, two genres of fiction rely heavily on the incorporation of biographical elements into their content, biographical fiction and autobiographical fiction.Contents1 Literary biography 2 Biographical criticism 3 Biographical fiction 4 Autobiographical fiction 5 References5.1 Works cited6 Further readingLiterary biography[edit] A literary biography is the biographical exploration of the lives of writers and artists
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James Joyce
James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, perhaps most prominently stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners
Dubliners
(1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
(1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in 41 Brighton Square, Rathgar, Dublin, into a middle-class family on the way down
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Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University
Wesleyan University
(/ˈwɛsliən/ WESS-lee-ən) is a private liberal arts college in Middletown, Connecticut, founded in 1831. Wesleyan is a Baccalaureate College that emphasizes undergraduate instruction in the arts and sciences, grants research master's degrees in many academic disciplines, and grants PhD degrees in biology, chemistry, mathematics and computer science, molecular biology and biochemistry, music, and physics.[5] Founded under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal Church
Methodist Episcopal Church
and with the support of prominent residents of Middletown, the now secular university was the first institution of higher education to be named after John Wesley, the founder of Methodism
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New York University
Coordinates: 40°43′48″N 73°59′42″W / 40.73000°N 73.99500°W / 40.73000; -73.99500New York UniversityLatin: Universitas Neo EboracensisMotto Perstare et praestare (Latin)Motto in EnglishTo persevere and to excelType Private[1]Established 1831[1]Endowment $3.991 billion (2017)[2]Budget $11.945 billion (fiscal 2018)[3]Chairman William R. Berkley[4]President Andrew D. HamiltonProvost Katherine E
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Concordia University (Montreal)
Maroon, Gold, Black and White                    Athletics CIS – RSEQNickname StingersAffiliations AUCC, IAU, ACU, ATS, CARL, CIS, QSSF, CUSID, CBIE, CFS, CUP, IAU.Mascot BuzzWebsite Concordia.ca Concordia University
Concordia University
(commonly referred to as Concordia) is a public comprehensive university located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada[6] on unceded Indigenous lands.[7] Founded in 1974 following the merger of Loyola College and Sir George Williams University, Concordia is one of the three universities in Quebec
Quebec
where English is the primary language of instruction
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